Food Safety Innovation Conference 2024 - A Resounding Success

Food Safety Innovation Conference 2024 - back by popular demand. Dynamic industry event secures glowing reviews for the second year in a row.

Following the huge success of last year’s Food Safety Innovation Conference, the event made its triumphant return to the University of Lincoln on Thursday 13th June.

With even more delegates than the year before, a dedicated group of industry sponsors, and a line-up of expert speakers featuring both new and familiar faces, the 2024 Conference didn’t just recreate the success of the inaugural event, but took things one step further.

In fact, co-hosts Klipspringer and FoodClean spent the last year learning from the key takeaways of the 2023 Conference and identifying areas for improvement. The result? A more insightful, inspirational, and enjoyable experience for everyone involved.

© Phil Crow

Opening Remarks

To ensure the event got off to a strong start, delegates were greeted with a selection of hot drinks and pastries. This was followed by a warm welcome from Chair of the event: Alec Kyriakides.

As the former Head of Product Quality, Safety, and Supplier Performance for Sainsbury’s, Alec was the perfect person to introduce the expert speakers, run through the agenda for the day, and provide a comprehensive overview of Food Safety in the Last Year. 

With Alec’s contribution a highlight of the 2023 event, his return was greatly anticipated and he didn’t disappoint – sharing trend analysis and poignant statistics, not to mention a fascinating revelation about the most unusual product recall of the past year.

The Presentations

Attendees were then treated to a series of presentations from four of the leading voices in the food production industry:

First to present was Madeleine Wilson, Director of Own Brand at Waitrose & Partners. Speaking on Climate Change and the Impact on Food Safety, Maddy challenged delegates to think about what their business could be doing to drive sustainability – sharing invaluable insights from her own work at Waitrose & Partners.

Next to speak was Lalaina Randriamanantsoa​, Senior Technical Manager at the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI). After walking delegates through a detailed description of what the GFSI does and how it functions, Lalaina discussed the organisation’s plans for the year ahead. 

Director of Policy for the Food Standards Agency (FSA), Rebecca Sudworth followed Lalaina with a presentation on Innovation in Incident Prevention: Root Cause Analysis and Industry Learnings. 

Rebecca explained how the FSA works and how it is structured. She also covered the most notable trends in terms of Food Safety Incidents.

Finally, Rob Artley, QEHS Director for Arla Foods spoke on Innovation in Food Safety Culture. He highlighted the importance of maintaining a broad perspective on culture and discussed the potential to innovate the growth of Food Safety Culture through the Modern People Agenda. 

The Workshops

Networking has always been a key focus of the Food Safety Innovation Conference. As a result, the event is populated with plenty of networking opportunities. This includes a Morning Break that saw delegates treated to canapés and a return performance from the Klipspringer band. 

This sense of communication and collaboration continued into the first two workshops of the day, with delegates encouraged to share questions and real-life examples throughout the process.

Entitled Innovation in Hygiene, Workshop One was led by Lars Turner, FoodClean Director, along with Katie Satterthwaite and Laura Luque-Carey, Directors of Food Safety Excellence Ltd. The expert trio unpacked advances in hygienic design and allergen changeover cleaning. 

Running alongside this discussion was Workshop Two, led by Mick West, Global Director of Quality Systems for Kerry and Debbie Barnes, Director of Central Technical Operations at Sainsbury’s. This session took participants on a digital journey, with Mick and Debbie sharing real-life examples of how digitalisation could help to enhance food safety and quality management control. 

Delegates then made their way into their choice of Workshops Three and Four.

Led by Dr Stephan Speidel, Scientific Advisor for HyServe GmbH and Gabriel Linder, Managing Director of HyServe GmbH, Workshop Three centred on Analytical Advancements, or more specifically, innovation in environmental hygiene testing.

Finally, Workshop Four was all about Root Cause Analysis. In this session John Figgins, Senior Technical Manager for BRCGS and Hugh Mowat, Technical & Compliance Director at Morrisons, outlined a hands-on approach to establishing a root cause.

The Panel

Once everyone had enjoyed the delicious buffet lunch, delegates returned to the main theatre for an Interactive Panel session.

Chaired by Denis Treacy, the Former Chief Officer for Safety & Quality at Pladis Global, the panel was made up of the following industry experts:

In addition to discussing the key learnings of the day and identifying the best way to tackle future food safety challenges, the panel addressed a wide range of delegate questions. The experts covered topics including climate change, auditing, collaboration across different sites and retailers, culture, and AI technology.

Closing words

Once the panel session had ended and the key questions had been answered, it was time for Alec to close the conference – thanking Klipspringer and FoodClean for arranging the event, the industry speakers for their informative presentations and workshops, along with the delegates for their unwavering energy and enthusiasm. 

The Conference closed with some final words from Murray Carlyon, Managing Director of Klipspringer and Ben Turner, Managing Director of FoodClean. Again, they thanked everyone involved in the event, but they also shared the exciting news that the Food Safety Innovation Conference will be returning for 2025.

Feedback from the 2024 event

A brilliant and truly insightful day. The FSI Conference offered a unique opportunity to collaborate with peers in the industry; through knowledge sharing we can advance food safety standards. Interactive workshops, panel discussions and individual presentations have provided inspiration which will further help on our mission to protect the magic of the Marks and Spencer food business through delivering safety as a service.”  

Bethany Gammon, Compliance Manager at Marks and Spencer 

“Slick and professionally organised from start to finish: amazing location, sharp and content rich presentations, expert-fuelled workshops, plus an unscripted, honest and insightful panel discussion. This is what the Food Industry has been missing for years. There is only one Food Safety Conference. Roll on FSI 2025!”  

Denis Treacy, Chief Executive Officer of Culture Compass

“Great conference! A pleasure to co-lead the digital session with Debbie Barnes to an audience that was definitely up for the Human Intelligence vs Machine Intelligence exercise.” 

Mick West, Global Director of Quality Systems at Kerry

“What an amazing day to learn from incredible professionals from various areas of the Food Industry about topics such as sustainability, climate change, AI, hygiene testing, and – of course – food safety.” 

Sofia Carneiro, Food Quality Manager for WildBran, LDA

“An excellent event, so good to be in the presence of so many like minded professionals with such a wealth of experience across the industry. Also, so nice to catch up with some former colleagues from the previous sites I’ve worked with.” 

John Burkitt, Hygiene Manager for 2 Sisters Food Group

“I had the opportunity to delve into the world of Food Safety with George Fiotakis, exploring how retailers, manufacturers, and suppliers all contribute to ensuring safe food reaches our homes. Discussions on climate change, AI, and innovation also shed light on the exciting future trajectories of the industry. 

Chris Martin, Business Development Manager UK&I Food and Beverage at Ecolab

“A well organised and executed event, enhancing many key topics and practices to benefit the industry. 

Myles Godden, Director of HVDS Ltd.

Ready to secure your spot at the 2025 event?

To receive information and alerts, along with an Early Bird Discount when bookings open, click the button below and register your interest for the FSI Conference 2025. 


World Food Safety Day

World Food Safety Day 2024: Join the Global Campaign

World Food Safety Day 2024

On Friday 7th June, World Food Safety Day will be taking place for the sixth year running. In anticipation of this international event, the theme for this year has been announced:

Food Safety: prepare for the unexpected

This theme has been selected in the hopes that more people will understand the following points:

  • Everyone has an essential role to play in ensuring food safety.
  • Food Safety Incidents are connected through a global food supply chain.
  • Food Safety Incidents can range from a contained event to a major international crisis, with examples including food poisoning, product recalls, or even a natural disaster.
  • The best defence against Food Safety Incidents is to prepare for the unexpected.

Why is it so important to recognise World Food Safety Day 2024?

According to the World Health Organisation:

Every year, one in ten people worldwide fall ill from contaminated food.

The UN agency has also confirmed that:

Over 200 diseases are caused by the consumption of food that has been contaminated by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or chemical substances such as heavy metals.

Statistics like this really drive home the importance of food safety, not just on June 7th, but as an ongoing cause for concern.

With this in mind, we have pulled together a list of resources related to the key issues surrounding food safety, covering everything from allergen segregation and food safety culture to the most common non-conformities and the early audit data of BRCGS.

Food Safety - Articles and Help Guides

If you have plans to conduct on-site training in recognition of World Food Safety Day, the following four articles could be of use. They could also help you to decide on your next steps if the upcoming event has inspired you to question your site’s current processes.

Unpacking Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard

On August 1st 2023, BRCGS released the latest issue of the Global Standard in Food Safety. This article walks you through the key takeaways. It also offers guidance and support in regards to meeting the newly revised requirements.

What is Food Safety Culture and why is it so important to a Food Production Site?

In the journey towards a positive Food Safety Culture, the first step is understanding exactly what this means. In addition to offering an answer to this question, this guide will also outline a clear strategy for achieving one.

How to avoid the top Hygiene Non-Conformities of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard, Version 9

This article offers a closer look at the top hygiene non-conformities (so far) issued against Version 9 of the Global Food Safety Standard. It also provides practical guidance on how best to avoid them.

Allergen Segregation in the Food Production Industry - Everything you need to understand

A key talking point relating to food safety is allergen control, with approximately 1-2% of adults living with a food allergy and 5-8% of children. This article will bring you up-to-date with everything you need to know.

Food Safety - Webinars

Along with our range of articles and help guides, we have also produced a series of webinars that address topics relating to food safety. You can click here to access a complete list of recordings. Alternatively, you can start your journey with the two webinars featured below.

The Power of Positive Energy: Driving Predictable Food Safety Outcomes

Building on the success of the Food Safety Innovation Conference 2023, the following four industry experts came together for a webinar on Predictable Food Safety Outcomes:

  • Alex Carlyon, Klipspringer Director
  • Lars Turner, Sales Director of FoodClean
  • Denis Treacy, Former Chief Officer for Safety and Quality at Pladis Global
  • Reineke van Riemsdijk, Technical Quality Manager and Sustainability Lead at Nestlé Nespresso

During this webinar, the panel addressed topics such as: Zero Defect Food Safety, the Four Energies of Repeatable and Predictable Outcomes, The Power of Positive Objectives, The GOYA Principle, and the secret to Positive Decision Making.

Food Safety Management: The Secret to Reliable Results

For this webinar, Alex Carlyon and Denis Treacy were joined by former GFSI Board Member John Carter. With a focus on Effective Food Safety Management, the panel entered into a lively discussion on Zero Defect Food Safety, the Four Energies of Repeatable and Predictable Outcomes, and the Importance of Functional Equity.

The webinar was then closed off with an informative Q&A session. Topics covered included:

  • Incentivising independence amongst your workforce
  • Securing the support of senior management when driving Food Safety Improvements
  • Turning Food Safety Management ideas into action

The Food Safety Innovation Conference

Here at Klipspringer, Food Safety sits at the heart of everything we do. That is why, working in collaboration with FoodClean, we launched the Food Safety Innovation Conference in 2023. This unique event brings together industry professionals to discuss the advancement of food safety, the importance of true innovation, and the value of challenging the status quo.

Returning for 2024, this year’s conference will cover a wide range of topics, including: Quality Management Systems, Hygienic Design and Cleaning, Root Cause Analysis, and the relationship between Culture and Food Safety.

If you would like any additional support or resources ahead of World Food Safety Day, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below.


    Spill Kits

    Spill Kits: A Guide to Spill Containment at Food Production Sites

    From spill kits to shadow boards, this article addresses everything you need to know about the containment of spills, leaks, and breakages at your food production site.

    As a food production site, it is essential that you have a clear plan in place for the containment and clean-up of spills, leaks, and breakages. If this is not the case, your operation could be at risk of a food safety incident and a serious point of audit non-conformance.

    Alternatively, if your site has an effective plan in place, you will see this reflected in reduced downtime, improved audit performance, and an unwavering culture of food safety.

    Here at Klipspringer, we have been supporting food and beverage factories for over twenty years, so spill response is an area where we’ve garnered a fair amount of expertise. Keen to put this to good use, we have created a guide that covers everything you need to know about spill containment and the different solutions available.

    Glass Breakage, Allergen and Bio Hazard Spill Kits

    Clause 4.9.1.1 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard outlines the expectation that food production sites establish “procedures to manage any spills” in an effort to “prevent chemical contamination”.

    Clause 5.3.4 also stresses the importance of a site establishing procedures “to ensure the effective management of allergenic materials to prevent cross-contamination of products not containing the allergen”. One of the listed procedures is “waste handling and spillage controls”.

    These guidelines highlight the relationship between food safety, audit compliance, and the effective management of spills and breakages. So, with that in mind:

    What is the best way to manage spills and breakages at your food production site?

    Let’s start by looking at the different spills and breakages your operatives are likely to encounter:

    Hazardous Materials

    When it comes to containing small chemical spills, your operatives will benefit from bespoke equipment such as chemical resistant gloves, chemical socks and pads, washable aprons, and a bucket with a precise-pour spout, self-draining base, and a click-on lid.

    Bio Hazards (Bodily Fluids)

    For the containment of a Bio Hazard incident, your team will need disposable covers such as armlets, aprons, and overshoes. Disinfectant spray, cleaning cloths, and alcohol- free wipes will also help to remove any residue, with a large lobby pan removing the bulk of the waste.

    Glass and Hard Plastic

    As you can imagine, an incident involving glass and hard plastic could result in a serious case of foreign body contamination. Fortunately, a brush with soft/medium bristles will easily sweep up any remnants, with a crevice brush tackling those hard-to-reach spaces.

    Allergens (Solids)

    An allergen spill has the potential to halt production, so it’s important that your operatives can act quickly and effectively. One solution is for your team to use a soft/ medium bristle brush to sweep up any loose residue, then a hand spatula or bowl scraper for anything tougher.

    Allergens (Liquids)

    When it comes to an allergenic spill of liquids such as milk and peanut oil, absorption is key, with equipment like spill absorbent pads playing a key roll. You also need to think about where the liquid will go, ideally placed safely inside a production bucket with a lid.

    Allergens (Powders)

    The process for managing spills of powdered allergens isn’t too dissimilar from the process of removing glass and hard plastic – sweeping the area with a hand brush, then following up with a crevice brush. Your team could also use a cleaning cloth to safely remove the residue.

    What is the best way to store the spill kits at my site?

    It’s important to note that your operatives will almost exclusively be searching for a spill kit in a moment of crisis – responding to a serious spill or breakage. Because of this, you need to ensure your equipment is highly visible and easily accessible.

    One of the best ways to achieve this is by storing it on a designated shadow board, positioned in close proximity to your production line and in clear view of everyone on site. Colour coding and printed headers will also help your operatives to distinguish between different kits.

    What do I do when I run out of my spill kit essentials?

    You can extend the lifespan of your equipment by opting for spill kits that can be topped up with refill packs. This will save you from replacing your kit every time an incident occurs – an unnecessary expense in instances where only a cleaning cloth or a length of spill tape has been used.

    If you explore this option, make sure to add a note to any records of your spillage procedure and to highlight it in your training. That way, your operatives will know to start with a refill pack before jumping straight to a total replacement.

    Absorbent Equipment

    When it comes to the containment and disposal of a liquid, there is also the option of using individual pieces of absorbent equipment to deal with any incidents.

    Below is a list of the most popular absorbents, along with a brief explanation of how they are typically used at a food production site.

    A

    Featuring central perforation for easy tearing and economical use, spill control rolls are likely one of the most recognisable products within this range. Offering a strong wicking action for the rapid and effective management of spills, there are dedicated rolls available for the clean-up of chemicals, oils, and maintenance leaks.

    B

    If your site works with drip trays, absorbent cushions could help you to minimise spillage when emptying the contents. You could even place the cushion inside the tray as a quick and easy way to soak up any leaks. Absorbent cushions can also be placed beneath leaking hoses and fittings or applied directly to a spill.

    C

    Another solution to explore is absorbent socks. Available in different lengths and quantities, absorbent socks are ideal for surrounding spills or leak-prone equipment to quickly soak up any liquids on contact – reducing contamination and simplifying the clean-up process for your operatives.

    D

    Spill control pads are suited to the rapid absorption of liquids and are commonly used for the clean-up of factory bench-tops. In addition to strong wicking action for increased durability, your pads should ideally feature central perforations, as this will make for convenient tearing and use.

    E

    If your site has sustainability targets to hit, you should also consider absorbent pads made from recycled cotton fibres. Selecting an eco-friendly option doesn’t have to mean compromising on quality, as the recycled pads within our Maintenance Range absorb 25% more oil than standard polypropylene pads.

    Absorbent Spill Kits

    Typically, a liquid spill will fall into one of three categories, so with this in mind, we have developed a range of Absorbent Spill Kits.

    Designed to handle spills starting at 20 litres and working all the way up to 240 litres, each kit within this range is available in three different forms:

     

    Below are the details of what you can find in each kit:

    20 Litre Break Packs

    • Clear heat-sealed bag to suit the harsh conditions of a factory environment.
    • 2 x absorbent socks to confine spills and safeguard drains.
    • Absorbent pads for the fast absorption of liquids.
    • Disposable bag with a zip-tie to support the safe removal of soiled clean-up materials.
    • 50 textured wipes to wipe down the impacted surface after the clean-up has taken place.

    45 and 50 Litre Shoulder Packs

    • PVC Shoulder Bag for easy transportation across your site.
    • Absorbent socks to confine spills and safeguard drains. Three 8cm x 1.2m for the 45l kit and two 8cm x 3cm for the 50l kit.
    • Absorbent pads for the fast absorption of liquids.
    • Disposable bag with a zip-tie for the safe removal of soiled clean-up materials. One for the 45l kit and two for the 50l kit.
    • 50 textured wipes to wipe down the impacted surface after the clean-up has taken place.

    The 45 litre kits have recently been updated to contain a more relevant selection of equipment, this has resulted in a cost saving of 37%.

    120 and 240 Litre Wheelie Bins

    • Wheelie bin for easy transportation across your site. Small for the 120l kit and medium-sized for the 240l kit.
    • Absorbent socks to confine spills and safeguard drains. Six 8cm x 3m for the 120l kit and eleven 8cm x 3m for the 240l kit.
    • Absorbent pads for the absorption of liquids. Forty-five 39cm x 48cm for the 120l kit and 100 39cm x 48cm for the 240l kit.
    • Disposable bag with a zip-tie to support the safe removal of soiled materials. Three for the 120l kit and four for the 240l kit.
    • 100 textured wipes to wipe down the impacted surface after the clean-up has taken place.

    The 250 litre kits have recently been updated to contain a more relevant selection of equipment, this has resulted in a cost saving of 13%.

    Absorbent Refill Kits

    As with the spill kits at your site, you should also explore the benefits of absorbent kits that have refill packs available. Once again, this will save you the hassle and expense of replacing the entire kit after every incident. With the shoulder packs and wheelie bins designed to withstand a harsh factory environment, they can be used multiple times. However, once your operatives have used materials such as the absorbent socks and pads, or worked their way through the textured wipes, refills will need to be arranged.

    You can explore the equipment within this range by using the buttons below:

    Preventative Action: Spills and Leaks

    Finally, preventative action should play a key role in the effective management of spills at your food production site.

    In addition to having the right equipment on hand to clean-up any incidents, you should also reduce the risk of leaks and spills reaching your factory floor in the first place.

    Spill Pallets

    Spill pallets scale down the surface area your team will need to clean if a spill or leak takes place.

    This process should also be made a lot easier by the fact that the pallets are made from chemical-resistant, UV-stabilised polyethylene (PE) and feature a removable platform with hand inserts. Instead of rushing to contain and clean-up any spills on your factory floor, your operatives will have a reliable safeguard to fall back on.

    Drum Trays

    Another option to explore is Drum Trays – deep trays suited to applications that are prone to leaks. Again, this solution will provide an added layer of defence, collecting any spills before they have chance to spread across your factory floor.

    Easy to clean, durable, and resistant to rust, they can be used for the storage of containers or as a protective base for dispensing applications.


    We hope this article has provided some clarity in regards to the best approach to spill containment at your food production site, highlighting the wide variety of solutions available to you and your team. From grab-and-go chemical spill kits to wheelie bins for the management of a major oil leak, there is an equipment bundle for every application.

    If you are looking to enhance your factory’s current approach to the handling of spills and breakages, the Klipspringer team would be happy to provide support. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation.  

    If you would like further guidance relating to the content shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


      The Proactive Food Safety Conference

      The Proactive Food Safety Conference 2024: Klipspringer Announces Partnership

      What is The Proactive Food Safety Conference 2024?

      Returning for its eighth year, with a peer-reviewed agenda, The Proactive Food Safety Conference is a conference and networking exhibition “created by the food and drink industry for the food and drink industry”.

      Taking place in London, Westminster on Thursday, 6th June, this practitioner-led event will address the topics of:

      • Practical and rigorous allergen control
      • Product safety and integrity across disrupted supply chains
      • Defending against food fraud threats
      • Positive and empowered food safety cultures

      • Key regulatory updates
      • New digital, tech and tools
      • Sustainability and consumer trust
      • Microbiology and food safety
      • Communicative and compliant labelling

      The Proactive Food Safety Conference is an important occasion in the Klipspringer calendar, so we are extremely excited to announce our attendance at this year’s event.

      Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon, along with Wes Carlyon from our Retail and Hospitality Business Development Team will be at the Klipspringer stand throughout the day – on hand to connect with likeminded industry professionals during the event’s multiple networking sessions and breakout discussions. Both Alex and Wes look forward to seeing you there!

      When and where is the Proactive Food Safety Conference, and how much does it cost to attend?

      Date

      Thursday 6th June 2024

      Location

      One Great George Street (Institution of Civil Engineers), Westminster, London, SW1P 3AA

      Time

      • Registration, Informal Networking & GIC Welcome: 8:15
      • Official Close of Conference: 16:55

      Ticket Prices

      One-Day Conference, London (Inhouse Brand Rate): £599 +VAT

      One-Day Conference, London (Agency/Supplier/All Other Rates): £849 + VAT

      Group Discounts (4 for 3): £1,797 VAT

      Speaker notes only: £199

      What can I expect from The Proactive Food Safety Conference 2024?

      With 28 inspirational speakers addressing nine industry-specific topics, The Proactive Food Safety Conference is set to be an unmissable occassion. The official Event Guide has now been released, so we have included three expected highlights below:

      • Following the implementation of Natasha’s Law and public support for Owen’s Law, industry voices from the Compass Group, Bernard Matthews, Mars Wrigley, and Greene King will discuss what’s next for allergen management.
      • Gideon Ashworth, Technical Director from Bart Ingredients will tackle the topic of Food Fraud Threats in relation to the pandemic, Brexit, inflation, and the cost-of-living crisis.
      • Expert speakers from Just Eat, Deliveroo, Higgidy, Müller, and more will outline the practical measures your business could be taking to strengthen internal food safety culture.

      To learn more about The Proactive Food Safety Conference, simply use the following buttons.

      Alternatively, if you have a question for the Klipspringer team ahead of the conference, you can share your details using the contact form below.

      If you would like further guidance ahead of the event, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below.


        Detail Cleaning

        Detail Cleaning: Everything You Need to Know

        In this article we address everything you need to know about Detail Cleaning Equipment and the difference it could make to your food production site.

        With targets to hit, costs to cut, and deadlines to meet, finding the time to explore new and innovative solutions can be challenging. That is why so many food production sites stick to what they know when it comes to Detail Cleaning equipment.

        Unfortunately, this can lead to ineffective cleans, frustrated operatives, lengthy hygiene windows, and potential non-conformities. In contrast, the right Detail Cleaning equipment could breathe new life into your Hygiene Team, transforming once difficult and dangerous jobs into quick and easy tasks.

        With this in mind, we have put together an article that covers everything you need to know about Detail Cleans. From basic questions such as: What is Detail Cleaning? and What is the official guidance relating to Detail Cleans? to direct guidance on industry pain points like removing stubborn residues and cleaning inside vats, this guide has it all.

        There is even the option to share your specific challenges with a panel of industry experts who will take a look at your pain point and put together a bespoke solution.

        Throughout this article, we will be covering the topics listed below. Although there is valuable content in each section, you also have the option of using the following buttons to skip to the issue most relevant to your operation.

        What is Detail Cleaning?

        Detail Cleaning typically involves the removal of stubborn residues, the intricate navigation of machine parts, or the difficult task of reaching into awkward areas at near impossible angles. If a site has the right equipment and processes in place, Detail Cleans will be a regular occurrence, with Hygiene Teams carrying out an efficient and effective job every time. However, if Detail Cleaning is a real pain point for a site, it could go overlooked. Hygiene Teams may be forced to skip important jobs, achieve sub-par results thanks to broken or damaged utensils, and strain or hurt themselves whenever a Detail Clean occurs.

        Why is Detail Cleaning so important at a Food Production Site?

        Auditors will often head straight for the hard-to-reach areas of your site, aware that these are the places that are most likely to be missed by your Hygiene Team. Although compliance is hugely important, it’s also vital to remember why auditors adopt such a thorough approach. Ultimately, they are trying to help your site prevent a food safety incident, not to mention a serious or even fatal consequence for the consumers of your product. This becomes all the more important if your site has high risk zones or handles allergens and Free From products. If this is the case, standards will be higher and Detail Cleans should be prioritised.

        What is the official guidance relating to Detail Cleaning?

        Early audit data from BRCGS revealed that, as it stands, Clause 4.11.1 is proving to be the top minor non-conformity for audited sites. It states:

        “The premises and equipment shall be maintained in a clean and hygienic condition.” [EXTRACT].

        In a recent BRCGS webinar, Foram Mehta, the organisation’s Technical Manager, suggested that along with staff shortages and increased production demands, a key reason for this early trend could be the fact that hard-to-reach areas are going overlooked.

        During a second webinar, Foram, along with Klipspringer’s Director Alex Carlyon, encouraged Hygiene Teams to thoroughly investigate those awkward or out-of-site areas – highlighting the importance of searching under machines and checking the voids behind anything that is mounted on the wall. They also stressed how much of a difference it can make if sites equip their Hygiene Team with the right cleaning utensils.

        So, what is the best way to approach a difficult Detail Clean?

        With over two decades of experience in supporting food production sites, we have an in depth understanding of just how varied and complex a task Detail Cleaning really is. With this in mind, we have shared a list of the common pain points below.

        In the interest of helping your site to identify the right equipment and revolutionise your approach to Detail Cleaning, we have also provided solutions for each area of concern.


        Detail Cleaning: Stubborn residues

        One of the most common pain points relating to Detail Cleaning is the removal of stubborn residues, especially if a site is unable to use water or cleaning chemicals to ease the process. When it comes to finding the right utensil for this task, a long-length handle may not be necessary (unless, of course, the residue is in a hard-to-reach area). Instead, a shorter handle will allow for increased leverage and pressure. Equipment with an ergonomic design will also make life easier for your operatives, with features like finger/thumb contouring acting as a strong defence against conditions like Repetitive Strain Injury.

        As mentioned above, it is also possible that stubborn residues will form in the hard-to-reach areas of your site, making the task of removing them all the more difficult. In this instance, you should consider a brush with a ‘scraper nose’ at its tip, as this design feature can be used to lift up dirt and debris, without scratching the surface underneath.

        Another option is to choose a brush with a mixture of bristle types. Typically, a brush of this style will have softer bristles at the back for sweeping up light debris, then extra-stiff bristles at the front to loosen the more stubborn materials.

        Detail Cleaning: Inside vats and tanks

        If a Hygiene Team is forced to clean inside vessels such as vats and tanks with standard brushes, it will be near impossible for them to drive standards of effectiveness and efficiency. What’s more if they are having to reach far down into the vessels at awkward angles, they could be at risk of serious strain or injury.

        As a result, this particular task may go overlooked, with Hygiene Teams carrying it over until a Deep Clean takes place. In the meantime, your operatives could be making do with an ineffective clean, simply unable to work around the mechanisms or obstructions inside each vessel.

        Luckily, the right equipment can prevent this from happening. For example, Tank Brushes and Tube Brushes both have a symmetrical profile to ensure the effective cleaning of cylindrical vessels, with the tank brush also suited to the curved or right-angled connections between your factory walls and floors. The tank and tube brushes we supply here at Klipspringer are compatible with any of our handles, so this should also solve the issue of operatives having to reach down into the containers.

        Depending on the size of the vessel being cleaned, another option to consider is a Side Bristle Deck Scrub. The design of this multi-directional brush places two lengths of PBT filaments at different angles. This means it can thoroughly clean a container, without your operatives having to do lots of awkward manoeuvring. As a combination of a flat broom and tank brush, it could transform your site’s approach to cleaning large vessels.

        High reach pipes and ledges

        It can be extremely difficult to clean an area from far below and without a clear line of vision. It is also hard to apply pressure from a distance, so this is yet another area where your Hygiene Team could be at risk of hurting themselves. They will also be at risk of conducting an ineffective clean, with significant amounts of dirt and debris left behind.

        The best way to approach this challenge is to equip your operatives with handles that are the right length for the job. You could even opt for Telescopic Handles, as this will allow your team to adjust their utensil to the perfect length every time.

        You should also think carefully about the utensils that will be attached to the end of your handles. After all, your operatives will struggle to dislodge dirt with a standard brush head that has been designed with flat and smooth surfaces in mind.

        One option to explore is a flexible pipe brush, as this particular utensil can be bent to reflect the contours of the surface being cleaned. Imagine your Hygiene Team needs to clean behind a pipe that runs across the ceiling of your site, this tool will allow them to navigate any obstacles – reaching up and around the pipe to cover every possible area. This brush head could also be used inside a complex piece of machinery, as the flexibility will allow it to be moulded to suit the specific application.

        Behind/Between your machinery

        Next, you should consider the gaps behind and between your machinery. Often these spaces will be incredibly narrow and impossible to reach with a regular brush. As a consequence, there is a risk of them going overlooked by your Hygiene Team.

        How much of an issue is this? Well, these harbourage points are the perfect place for bacteria, dirt, and even pests to hide, with all three a serious risk to food safety. There is also a high possibility of auditors checking these spaces – viewing them as a good indication of just how thoroughly your site has been cleaned.

        In order to make it easier for your Hygiene Team to tackle this challenge, they will need access to narrow brushes with long-length handles. The ‘scraper nose’ and bristle mixes mentioned above could also prove invaluable when it comes to lifting stubborn residue.

        Another factor to consider is how well your chosen brush holds shape under a variety of conditions, as depending on the design, the bristles of your brushware may splay if they are exposed to water. However, the bristles of a bannister brush, for example, maintain a straight profile in both dry and damp conditions, affording them easy access through narrow spaces.

        A final point to prioritise is a diameter guard. Essentially a built-in health and safety device, this feature will allow your operatives to probe deeply between and behind machines, without risk of accident or injury.

        Detail Cleaning: Underneath your machinery

        During the BRCGS webinar with Foram and Alex, the underside of machines (e.g. food production belts) was highlighted as a space that is frequently overlooked by Hygiene Teams, but regularly checked by auditors.

        The Side Bristle Deck Scrub referenced in our earlier section on vats and tanks is a good pick for this application, with the multi-angled bristles perfect for dislodging dirt quickly and with minimal effort from your operatives.

        Another important step is to equip your Hygiene Team with LED torches and protective knee-pads that will allow them to inspect under each machine – investigating any small or dark crevices. You should also highlight the importance of internal audits, making them a key part of your site’s culture, as this process is likely to reveal any areas that are in need of further attention.

        Detail Cleaning: Tight/Narrow spaces

        Last but not least are the tight and narrow spaces around your factory. This is a task where long and thin utensils such as Bottle Brushes will come in handy, capable of tackling spaces with internal diameters ranging from 7-8mm to 60mm. There is also the option of working with a detachable version that can be attached to a long, flexible handle. This length and flexibility will allow your operatives to manoeuvre any obstacles as they reach far into the tightest of spaces. All of the thin and narrow utensils mentioned throughout this article will also be suited to the cleaning of tight/narrow areas, it is simply a case of choosing the right shape and size for each task.

        Detail Cleaning: Specific Applications

        Although we have addressed a lot of the common Detail Cleaning applications above, we recognise that every site is different, with each Hygiene Team facing a unique set of challenges.

        To account for this, we wanted to give you the chance to share your pain points with a panel of experts. Using the form below, you can share your Detail Cleaning challenges, along with any supporting images of the areas you are struggling to clean.

        You can either share your contact details or remain anonymous.

          UPLOAD YOUR IMAGE(S)

          Please upload your image(s) - preferably in JPEG (.jpg) or PNG (.png) format. Maximum file size 20mb.

          How do you ensure your team are carrying out effective cleans?

          A common concern surrounding the introduction of new equipment is employee engagement. In some instances, this will require in depth training and ongoing support. However, in the case of Detail Cleaning equipment, the support of your operatives is almost guaranteed. After all, the right equipment will resolve pain points that your team may have been struggling with for months or even years. It will make life easier for your operatives, helping them to achieve a more effective clean in less time and with less risk to their personal safety.

          As a result, your main focus should be on ensuring your team know about the new equipment, highlighting its arrival with Visual Management, updated Cleaning Instruction Cards, and perhaps a quick demonstration of how the utensils work.

          You should also consider bringing your equipment out into the open with highly visual storage solutions like shadow boards. All too often, we hear of sites investing in new equipment only to lock it away or store it in a location that is inconvenient for their operatives. By clearly displaying your Detail Cleaning equipment, you can ensure it is front and centre of your operatives’ minds. You will also be able to identify any broken or damaged equipment before a food safety incident occurs and re-order utensils using the QR function.

          Shadow boards

          Shadow board Inspiration Guide

          Want to learn more about shadow boards? From engineering tool boards and storage for your spill kits to PPE bases and change part stations, there are over 70 shadow board designs to explore in our Inspiration Guide.

          An Introduction to Klipspringer’s Range of Detail Cleaning Equipment

          In the interest of supporting your site’s colour-coding and segregation plans, the equipment within our Detail Cleaning range is available in a selection of different colours.

          Long-handled Slimline Brush

          • Flexible and durable handle
          • Scraper nose and extra-stiff bristles at the front to remove stubborn residues

          Hand Scrubs

          • Available in different sizes
          • Raised handle and pointed nose (available)
          • Hanging eye (available)

          Hand Scrapers/Spatulas

          • Stainless steel or food contact approved polypropylene
          • Hanging eye for storage

          Churn Brushes

          • Rubber edge to avoid damage (available)
          • Extended bristles around leading edge (available)

          Utility Brushes

          • Long handle for hard to reach areas (available)
          • Short handle for maximum pressure (available)

          Tank Brushes

          • Symmetrical profile for cleaning of cylindrical vessels, plus curved and right-angled connections

          Bannister Brushes

          • Up to nine colours
          • Two filament strengths
          • Maintains straight profile in dry and damp conditions

          Tube Brushes

          • 70, 80, 90, 105, and 120mm sizes available
          • Compatible with all Klipspringer handles

          Machine/Cutter Brushes

          • Built-in Diameter Guard (available)
          • Choose between two sizes

          Side Bristle Deck Scrub

          • Mix of two filament lengths
          • Multi-directional (ideal for curved intersections and awkward angles)

          Dishwash Brushes

          • Scraper nose (available)
          • Round nose for working down into smaller vessels (available)

          Flexible Pipe Brushes

          • Food contact approved
          • Bend to contours of surface being cleaned
          • Reach pipes and ledges

          Detail Brush

          • Ergonomic handle
          • Scraper nose to remove stubborn residues
          • Short handle for leverage
          • Extra-stiff bristles

          Bottle Brushes

          • Cleans internal dimensions from 7-8mm to 60mm
          • Ergonomic, polygrip handle
          • Available in seven colours
          • No exposed sharp ‘wire’

          So that brings us to the end of our guide to Detail Cleaning, we hope that it has suitably addressed the key areas of interest. However, we want to treat this article as an ongoing project that evolves to meet your specific requirements. So, if you have any ideas in terms of the content we could add or any points where you would like us to go into more detail, we would really appreciate your feedback.

          We would also like to hear from you if you want to know more about our range of Detail Cleaning Equipment or you are currently evaluating the cleaning processes at your factory. We have been partnering with food production sites for over twenty years, so this is an area where we can provide support. You can contact us on 01473461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

          If you would like further guidance relating to the problems or solutions mentioned in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


            Shadow Board Project

            How do I Ensure My Shadow Board Project is Successful?

            In this article, we will present five ways that you can secure success when introducing shadow boards to your food production site.

            Since popularising this storage solution in 2011, we have supported countless sites with their shadow board projects. Because of this, we are extremely familiar with what it takes for a shadow board project to enhance an operation – extending the lifespan of equipment, making life easier for hygiene and production teams, reducing food safety risks, and cutting down on wasted time.

            We are also aware of the common queries and concerns surrounding shadow boards, with one of the most frequently asked questions: How do I ensure my shadow board project is successful? This is an important point to address and one that we will be covering in the following article.

            We have split this guide into five key action points and there are valuable takeaways in each section. However, if you are short on time, you can use the links below to jump to the topic most relevant to your project.

            Prioritise the Training of Your Operatives

            Often, sites that struggle with unenthusiastic operatives and missing or damaged equipment will view shadow boards as an unnecessary complication. After all, it can be hard to imagine a reluctant workforce engaging with any new addition.

            However, if they are rolled out alongside a comprehensive training program, shadow boards have the potential to win over even the most stubborn of operatives. The trick is to highlight the key benefits that will be enjoyed by everyone who engages with them:

            • Instead of searching for the right equipment or making do with utensils that have been damaged by improper storage, your operatives will be able to find what they need immediately.
            • A highly visual storage solution will allow your operatives to keep a close eye on the quality and suitability of each item. Any replacements can then be ordered in plenty of time.
            • Manufactured using fully certified, anti-scuff, water repellent materials, shadow boards will be easy for your Hygiene Team to keep clean.

            Alternatively, if your team is already made up of motivated and dedicated operatives, any training requirements will be minimal. Shadow boards are a user-friendly storage solution that clearly indicates where each piece of equipment needs to be placed. They can also be set up in around five minutes and have been designed with ease-of-cleaning in mind.

            Evaluate Your Colour-Coding Policy

            Before committing to the installation of new shadow boards, its important that you take a moment to assess your site’s current approach to colour-coding. After all, shadow boards could help to reinforce this policy if you have them printed in the colours of your factory zones and the equipment that will be hung on them. This will only be a positive thing if your colour-coding policy makes sense. However, if your policy is overcomplicated and in need of updating, you will want to do this before ordering your boards.

            Drawing on his 20 years of industry experience, Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon has created a guide to simplifying the colour-coding policy at your site. Our team can also help you with this task, supporting you as you tackle common challenges such as allergen segregation, production zoning, and audit compliance.

            Consider the Care and Maintenance of Your Shadow Boards

            Whenever you are introducing new equipment or storage solutions to your site, it’s important to consult with your Hygiene Team. After all, they will be responsible for keeping your boards in good condition and getting the equipment ready for your production line.

            If your Hygiene Team is involved in the early stages of the shadow board project, they will likely appreciate the selection of shadow boards that are water repellent, food-safe, and resistant to scuffs and scratches.

            The avoidance of hidden crevices is also key, so pay close attention to the hook system and mounting method of your boards. As far as your Hygiene Team is concerned, magnetic mounting should be ideal, as they will be able to lift the boards off the walls whenever they need to clean behind them – eliminating the tricky task of cleaning behind fixed boards or working around fiddly fastenings.

            Once you have selected your boards, the next step is to update the Cleaning Instruction Cards at your site. A top tip is to include lots of photos and to keep the instructions as simple as possible. When writing the CICs, you need to make sure your Hygiene Team know exactly what cleaning equipment to use for the boards, how often they need to clean them, and what condition the boards should be in ahead of production. Making this clear will help to extend the lifespan of your shadow board storage.

            Ensure the Proper Care of Equipment

            One of the main benefits of rolling out a shadow board project is that it will often bring hidden equipment out into a highly visual space – making it easier for you and your team to keep an eye on the condition of each utensil and cut down on the number of tools that go missing. Shadow boards will also safeguard your equipment from damage during storage, reducing the risk of them being knocked or scratched by passing operatives or containers. To ensure your site is reaping all of these benefits, it’s important that you encourage the proper care of equipment at every turn.

            As mentioned above, proper training is a great way to do this and you could even take this a step further by appointing shadow board heroes in each department – aka operatives who are responsible for encouraging their team to put equipment back in the right place and report any damaged equipment the moment it is spotted.

            Another idea is to add a heading to your shadow board that will reinforce a culture of care. For example, ‘Please clean equipment before returning to board’, ‘Food Contact Use Only’, and ‘All utensils must be returned to board clean and intact’.

            Establish a Clear Plan for the Future

            As with any new addition to your site, it’s essential to think about the future – embracing every opportunity to extend the lifespan of your shadow boards and make the most of them for years to come. With this in mind, you should consider the mounting method of your boards. This is particularly important if you regularly move around the production lines at your site. Here, freestanding shadow boards will be useful, especially ones with wheels, as it will be extremely easy for your operatives to move them as your site evolves. Shadow boards with magnetic mounting will also allow for this, simply lifted on and off the walls as required.

            Another idea is to include QR codes on your shadow boards. This will allow your operatives to re-order equipment at the click of a button. Instead of running the risk of the wrong utensils being selected or your team failing to get the right equipment in place before an important audit or customer visit, the QR codes will take your operatives directly to the relevant product page.

            Last but not least, the likelihood of your shadow boards standing the test of time increases dramatically if you opt for boards that have been designed with the harsh environment of a food factory in mind. For example, the shadow boards we supply are created using a direct print process, heat-sealed using anti-scuff laminate. Considerations like this will help to keep your boards free from scuffs, scratches, and peeling shadows.

            So there you have it, five opportunities to ensure your upcoming shadow board project is a success. From careful planning to inspiring your operatives, there are a number of points to consider, and the Klipspringer team is available to offer support every step of the way. Below are a selection of resources for you to make use of:

            You can also contact us directly on 01473461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

            If you would like further guidance relating to your shadow board project, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


              SegriCover

              Five Points to Consider When Selecting a SegriCover

              In this article we guide you through the process of introducing SegriCovers to your factory, helping you to decide if they are the right solution for your site.

              Designed with food factories in mind, a SegriCover is a bespoke, heavy-duty solution for equipment protection. It can help to:

                • Maximise hygiene
                • Minimise downtime
                • Promote sustainability
                • Reduce consumable costs
                • Boost productivity

              However, with some sites still relying on single-use plastic covers for the protection of their equipment, you may be wondering if a SegriCover is a necessity or just an added extra.

              This is something we hope to address in the following article, covering five questions to ask yourself if you are considering a SegriCover project. There are valuable takeaways in each section, but you can also use the links below to skip to the subject most relevant to your site.

              What equipment will be protected by my SegriCover?

              Before anything else, you need to identify the equipment at your site that is suited to a SegriCover. Most commonly this will be high value equipment in an area that is regularly cleaned by your hygiene team using water and cleaning chemicals, as opposed to dry clean utensils.

              An increasing number of sites are also requesting SegriCovers for their tote bins, wanting to protect the contents of each bin as it moves from one process to the next.

              Here at Klipspringer, we can supply SegriCovers for a wide range of applications, but we have listed six of the most popular examples below:

              How much will my SegriCovers cost/save my site in the long run?

              When answering this question, it’s a good idea to start with another: How expensive is the piece of equipment you are covering? With machinery, control panels, and conveyor belts some of the most common examples of equipment that needs to be covered during a clean, you can already guess at the potential costs of water damage and exposure to cleaning chemicals. Here, you should also factor in the cost of factory downtime due to damaged or faulty equipment.

              On the subject of downtime, another point to consider is the time it takes for your Hygiene Team to clean around machines that are uncovered or only protected by a single-use piece of plastic. In contrast, a durable cover that is easy to pull on and off should help your Hygiene Operatives to speed up their processes.

              Now, let’s address the upfront expense of a SegriCover. Due to the fact that each design is bespoke, it isn’t possible to provide a set cost. However, if you would like a general idea of how much this project could cost your site, you can use the SegriCover Online Calculator linked below.

              We would also recommend speaking to one of our team members directly, as they will be able to guide you through the process of securing the most affordable yet effective cover for your operation – identifying any areas where you could be making a saving. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com

              Do I have any specific requirements for my SegriCovers?

              As mentioned above, SegriCover designs are bespoke – made to measure based on the specific shape and size of the equipment being protected. You can also make special requests. For example, you can introduce one or more opening panels to your SegriCover – held in place with your choice of Velcro, zips, magnets, and eyelets. Another option is to add a window to the front panel, a design feature that comes in handy if your operatives still need to view a control panel when the equipment is covered. As with the size of the cover itself, you can also determine the size of the window, along with the position at which it sits.

              When commissioning your SegriCovers, it’s important to provide as many photographs as possible of the equipment in question, including photos from every angle. This will make it easier for the designers working on this project to match the cover to your request and identify any areas where the specifications might be in need of updating.

              What is the expected lifespan of my SegriCovers?

              If you have previously relied on single-use plastic covers to protect the equipment at your site, the durability of a SegriCover will provide quite a contrast.

              Made from waterproof and moisture-repellent PVC, SegriCovers can be exposed to water sprays, cleaning chemicals, and the expected wear and tear of a food production site. Here at Klipspringer, the weld on our SegriCovers comes with a lifetime guarantee, so this is another area where you can be sure of durability. Highlighting the heavy-duty nature of the covers to your site’s Leadership Team, along with the operatives who will be using them, should help you to secure a successful roll out, especially if you emphasise the potential savings of cutting out single-use plastic, along with the sustainability benefits.

              What are my plans for securing the engagement of my operatives?

              Another way to secure a successful roll out is to view your SegriCovers as an opportunity to make life easier for your team. One option is to introduce bespoke messaging and images for maximum visual impact.

              Say a pain point for your operatives is working out the difference between allergen and non-allergen tote bins, or perhaps they are concerned about the contents of each tote bin being contaminated as they move across your site. Here, a bright, colour-coded, custom printed SegriCover will provide an answer to all of these problems.

              It’s also important that your operatives are aware of the correct approach to using, storing, and cleaning the SegriCovers at your site. Not only will this help to further extend the lifespan of the covers, but it will also drive accountability, encouraging your team to embrace a collective responsibility for the new additions. Why not support the roll out with training sessions, detailed Cleaning Instruction Cards, Visual Management solutions, and a reminder of how they could be helping your team to secure audit compliance?

              So there you have it, five points to consider when bringing a SegriCover project to your site. We hope this article has highlighted the value of planning ahead, securing the support of your operatives, and sending over those all important photos when sharing your specifications.

              The Klipspringer team is on hand to support you through the process. You can contact us on 01473461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. Another option is to use the button below to learn more about magnetic mounting.

              If you would like further guidance relating to your SegriCover project, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                Sustainable

                Klipspringer's Commitment to a Sustainable Future

                In this article, we offer an honest account of our commitment to working in a sustainable manner that helps to conserve the natural resources of our planet.

                As a company, we developed the Future First Initiative in 2020 and have been operating under this ethos ever since.

                The best way to understand Klipspringer’s journey towards sustainability is through the 3-Pillar Approach outlined below:

                Customers

                We care about the sustainability commitments of our customers – offering support and solutions every step of the way.

                Products & Services

                We are determined to minimise the environmental impact of our products. Sustainability is key to our product development plans.

                Company

                We want to educate and empower the Klipspringer team, driving sustainability initiatives and nurturing a culture of responsibility.

                As you can see, we want our sustainability efforts to stretch right across the business, effecting positive change in every aspect of our operation.

                To ensure we are being transparent and encouraging our customers to hold us accountable, we decided to provide an overview of our efforts so far, along with a few examples of our action points for the year ahead.

                Bike2Work Scheme

                Here at Klipspringer, we are proud to be a part of the government-approved Bike2Work Scheme – an initiative that not only promotes the health and happiness of our employees, but also helps to reduce our collective carbon footprint. By making it easier for the Klipspringer team to access high quality bicycles and cycling equipment, our goal is to encourage everyone to reduce their car usage and the associated emissions. To support this scheme, our current offices have a dedicated area for bike storage and this will also be true of our new premises – with an even bigger bike rack on the cards.

                Driving Positive Change

                And for the staff members who live further away or are unable to cycle into work?

                We are also running an Electric Car Scheme that presents Klipspringer employees with an affordable opportunity to drive an electric vehicle.

                As a government-approved, salary sacrifice scheme, we believe this initiative will play an incredibly important role in our move towards a more sustainable future, with ‘commuting’ included as part of a company’s carbon footprint in regards to Scope 3 emissions.

                In the interest of providing a third option, Klipspringer has also launched a Car Share Scheme that encourages employees to make the journey in together – saving on fuel, reducing air pollution, and lowering the number of cars on the road.

                Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

                We have ensured ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle’ is a key part of our company culture, with this mindset applied to both our product range and our daily life at Klipspringer HQ.

                From recycling bins in our cafeteria to the introduction of a more energy efficient printer, we are determined to support and empower our employees at every turn.

                And in terms of our products, here are just some of the actions we have taken so far:

                • Prioritised the development of equipment that is in a Circular Economy
                • Launched a range of cleaning equipment that is made from recycled materials
                • Increased the range of electronic instruments in our popular trade-in scheme, which has been in place for over a decade
                • Supported customers with the switch to Digital Systems
                • Developed equipment that helps to reduce product waste
                • Consciously nurtured a supply chain that is based in Europe

                Partnerships & Certification 

                Conscious of the dangers of ‘green washing’, we understand that there needs to be real weight behind our eco-conscious claims.

                With this in mind, we have been a member of the Supplier Ethical Data Exchange (Sedex) since 2017, a market-leading sustainability platform that promotes responsible and ethical supply chain practices. This membership requires full compliance with the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI).

                It is also worth noting that through the trade-in scheme mentioned above, we recycle two models of industry scales in accordance with the WEEE Directive. Finally, we have made a commitment to monitor and reduce our Scope 1 emissions (direct greenhouse gases) and Scope 2 emissions (indirect greenhouse gases).

                Future Planning

                The Klipspringer team is incredibly excited to be making the move to a new premises in 2024. As well as giving us more space for our growing workforce and expanding product range, this move will also grant us the opportunity to speed up our journey towards a more sustainable future.

                Here are just some of the changes we will be making as we transition to our new headquarters:

                • Design an energy efficient premises e.g. improved insulation and LED lighting
                • Move away from gas towards an electric energy supply
                • Introduce a new, more energy efficient manufacturing process
                • Expand our range of sustainable/circular economy products
                • Monitor our Scope 3 emissions and identify the best solutions for reducing them
                • Minimise waste and continue to offer solutions that reduce food waste
                • Drive staff awareness in regards to conserving energy

                We hope this overview has provided you with a better understanding of Klipspringer’s ongoing commitment to sustainability. We encourage you to engage with the aspects of our operation that support your own environmental goals and to hold us accountable as we address the areas that require further enhancement.

                To learn more about our existing efforts or plans for a more sustainable future, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                If you would like further guidance relating to the information shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                  wet wipes

                  Will the UK's Ban on Wet Wipes Containing Plastic impact the Food Industry?

                  The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has confirmed plans for a UK-wide ban on wet wipes containing plastic. So, what does this mean for food production sites?

                  On Monday 22nd April 2024, in celebration of Earth Day, the Government shared its updated plans for the UK-wide ban of wet wipes containing plastic. Supported by 95% of the surveyed public, this ban aims to crack down on plastic pollution, moving the UK towards a circular economy for plastic products.

                  In its official Summary of Response, the Government emphasised the purpose of the ban is to “reduce the volume of plastic litter as well as the microplastics entering our waterways”*.

                  As wet wipes contain plastics that eventually break down into microplastics, the ban will safeguard against this, bolstered by research that suggests microplastics could be having an adverse effect on both our aquatic eco-systems and human health.

                  With calls for this legislation to come into force as soon as possible, it’s important to ask: how will the UK-wide ban on wet wipes containing plastic impact food production sites?

                  Exemptions for industrial (food production) and medical purposes

                  In the case of food production sites, it is essential that wet wipes possess properties such as “tensile strength [and] the ability to hold and apply certain disinfectants”.

                  Early research into the ban raised concerns that some plastic-free wet wipes would be less likely to offer these properties than the plastic alternatives.

                  In recognition of the fact that in some instances plastic-free wet wipes are unsuitable or unavailable, the ban is set to include one major point of exemption. This will allow “the supply and sale of wet wipes containing plastic for industrial and medical purposes”.

                  As a result, food production sites will still be permitted to buy wet wipes containing plastic either from verified suppliers or directly from manufacturers. Although it may not be relevant to your site, an additional guideline states that: once purchased, the wipes cannot be sold onto consumers. Here, pharmacies are the only exemption.

                  As a specialist supplier to the food industry, Klipspringer is in a position to ensure you have the most appropriate wipes for your application as a food manufacturer. You can view our full range of wet wipes below.

                  You can also reach out to our team today to discuss the best wipes for your application. Contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                  * Excerpts taken from the Government’s official Summary of Response, last updated 22nd April 2024

                  If you would like further information relating to compliance in this area, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below.


                    Hygiena

                    An Honest Comparison of the Most Popular Hygiene Monitoring Solutions

                    This guide presents an honest comparison of the A3 system and its three main competitors - helping you to make the best decision for your site.

                    Here at Klipspringer, we are proud to supply the A3 system and strongly believe in the benefits it brings to food production sites. However, our goal is never to persuade or pressure the businesses we work with. Instead, we aim to present relevant information in an honest and fair way – giving you the opportunity to explore the different options and find the solution that is right for you and your operation. With this in mind, we wanted to take a closer look a the A3 system’s three main competitors: the 3M Clean-Trace System, the Neogen AccuPoint® Advanced Next Generation, and the Hygiena EnSURE Touch®.

                    In this article, we will highlight the benefits and limitations of all three methodologies, along with the A3 system itself. We will also provide a detailed explanation of the biggest difference between the four solutions – taking a closer look at what they detect and why this is so important.


                    Plus, before reading any further, you can also follow the link below to watch a webinar on Hygiene Monitoring in High Care Environments. Hosted by Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon, our in-house A3 specialist Radek Tameczka, and scientific advisor Dr. Stephan Speidel, this webinar explores the limitations of conventional hygiene monitoring methods and provides real-world examples of A3 verification at High Care production sites.

                    What are the most popular Hygiene Monitoring Solutions?

                    Since its launch in 2017, the Lumitester A3 Smart System has been measured against three main competitors.

                    Below, we have listed the key differences between each system:

                    3M Clean-Trace System

                    Neogen AccuPoint® 

                    Hygiena EnSure Touch

                    Lumitester A3 Smart System

                    Benefits

                    Resources and helpline

                    .

                    Use the Surface Positive Control System to check the system is working

                    .

                    Cloud Computing to administrate hygiene monitoring

                    .

                    .

                    Easy-to-use

                    .

                    Free training program

                    .

                    The system generates  randomised plans for the testing of sites

                    .

                    The system supports the wireless transfer of data via WiFi connection

                    Easy-to-use

                    .

                    Online remote training

                    .

                    Compatible with tests for ATP, enzymes, allergens, protein & sugar

                    .

                    Syncs with analysis software to share results across sites

                    Easy-to-use

                    .

                    Ongoing training

                    .

                    Uses the Lumitester App to upload results to the cloud

                    .

                    Quick calibration time (2-3 days) with loan units available

                    .

                    Extendable Swab Holder

                    .

                    Enzyme active for 2 hours, with standard ATP test 

                    .

                    Detects ATP, AMP and ADP

                    Limitations

                    Only detects ATP

                    .

                    Only suited to a strong WiFi connection.

                    .

                    Batteries are expensive to replace

                    .

                    Can be difficult to implement due to complex, 3rd party software

                    Only detects ATP

                    .

                    Long turnaround for service and calibration

                    .

                    Batteries are expensive to replace

                    .

                    Limited support available

                    .

                    .

                    Only detects ATP

                    .

                    Rechargeable batteries will fail if used incorrectly 

                    .

                    Need to navigate menu before testing

                    .

                    Limited support available

                    .

                    .

                    Operatives who are used to ATP testing may be resistant

                    .

                    Connects via USB & Bluetooth not Wifi

                    Chemicals in Sample

                    Chlorhexidinedigluconate Humectant

                    No hazardous substances 

                    Benzethonium Chloride

                    Dry swabs available - no chemicals


                    Ease-of-use

                    One thing that all four systems have in common is the fact that they are incredibly straightforward when it comes to the testing process. Designed with the user experience in mind, they all involve a simple swab test, with the swab then placed inside a self-contained unit.

                    With an intuitive smartphone design, the Hygiena EnSURE® Touch is easy to navigate, small in size, but with maximum durability. The system also provides multiple testing options, compatible with test devices for ATP, enzymes, allergens, proteins, and sugar.

                    As an update to the standard Neogen AccuPoint®, the Neogen AccuPoint® Advanced Next Generation also has a touch screen design for easy navigation, as does the 3M Clean-Trace System and the Lumitester A3 Smart System. Although all four systems allow for one-handed operation to support multi-tasking, the 3M Clean-Trace model has been ergonomically designed to feature an extended base section. For some sites this may be a downside as the system is slightly larger. However, some operatives may find this unit easier to carry.

                    Chemicals in Samples

                    Another point to consider is the chemicals used in the different systems, paying particular attention to any chemical residue that could be left on a surface after you have swabbed it for testing. As you can imagine, a lot of sites feel it is counter productive for a system that tests the cleanliness of a surface to introduce a new chemical solution.

                    With this in mind, the Neogen AccuPoint® Advanced Next Generation has proved a popular choice for sites, due to the fact that it doesn’t transfer any potentially hazardous substances during the swabbing process. The A3 system also stands up to this criticism, as its range of compatible swabs includes dry swabs that don’t produce a chemical residue. Instead, if the swab is being used on a particularly dry surface, it can just be swirled in tap water for a couple of seconds. In contrast, the 3M Clean-Trace System relies on Chlorhexidinedigluc onate Humectant and the Hygiena EnSURE® Touch relies on Benzethonium Chloride.

                    Training and Support

                    When you are introducing a new system to your site, it’s important to factor in the training and resources that accompany your equipment. With some suppliers charging extra for even a standard level of support, you need to understand exactly what is included in the package you are considering. When it comes to the Hygiene Monitoring Systems mentioned in this article, all four options are geared up to help your operation. However, they do involve varying levels of support.

                    The 3M Clean-Trace System provides a selection of helpful resources for you to work through and share with your operatives. There is also a helpline that you can reach out to if you experience any teething issues or would like to learn more about the system.

                    The Neogen AccuPoint® and the Hygiena EnSURE® Touch both provide free, remote training programs, with the EnSURE® Touch featuring built-in screen-sharing capabilities. This should make it easier for you to secure the engagement of your site staff. Neogen also provides 24/7 global support and gives you the option of paying for on-site training.

                    As for the A3 system, our in-house Technical Support Team works closely with a team of microbiologists to provide ongoing support, resources, and training. Headed up by our in-house A3 expert Radek Tameczka, they will guide you through the Validation Process, helping you to establish Test Points and Referential Benchmarks. This process will be used to create a Validation Document that you can share with your auditors to highlight the effectiveness of the A3 system and explain your choice of test points and benchmarks. Our Technical Support Team will also help you to update and enhance the cleaning procedures at your site so you can be sure of a pass result. Throughout this process, you will be able to contact Radek directly at radek.tameczka@klipspringer.com or on 01473 461800

                    Managing, Tracking, and Analysing Your Data

                    Another consideration is the software that works alongside your Hygiene Monitoring system. After all, you could save a huge amount of time, money, and effort with the help of intelligent software that processes your data for you.

                    The Neogen AccuPoint® Advanced Next Generation is compatible with the new Neogen® Analytics Insights cloud-based software, with Neogen® offering training to sites that are new to this system.

                    The Hygiena EnSURE® Touch connects to SureTrend® using Wifi and a secure SSL encryption to store your data. You can then carry out detailed data analysis. What’s more, if your operation isn’t suited to testing every location every day, you can use the software to generate random test plans.

                    The 3M System also has its own data analysis technology that has been redesigned to consolidate information and be as user-friendly as possible.

                    Finally, the A3 System works in conjunction with the Lumitester App. This software automatically turns your inspection pass rates into graphs, allows you to set test points and benchmark values, displays time-series data for each test, and tracks overall inspection scores.

                    ATP vs ATP + AMP +ADP

                    All of the factors mentioned above are important and should be taken into consideration as you establish the best approach to Hygiene Monitoring for your site. However, the matter of detection capability is where the biggest difference between the four methodologies can be found.

                    As you will have noticed in the table at the beginning of this article, the A3 system is the only Hygiene Monitoring Solution that is capable of detecting ATP, ADP, and AMP. In contrast, the other systems are only able to detect ATP.

                    So why does this matter?

                    As a molecule found in all living cells, ATP is often tested for when sites want to establish the overall hygiene levels of a surface and efficiency of a clean. The problem is, ATP is an unstable molecule that degrades to ADP and AMP during processes such as cleaning, heating, blanching, and fermentation. It also degrades naturally even when none of these processes have taken place. As a result, the standard ATP tests mentioned throughout this article are unable to detect all organic residue. Instead, they detect ATP, but are incapable of detecting ADP and AMP. Consequently, they will commonly pass contaminated surfaces that would fail even a visual check.

                    The video below provides an example of this in action, with the A3 system used alongside the 3M Clean-Trace System, the Hygiena EnSURE Touch®, and the Neogen AccuPoint® System. At the time of testing the Neogen AccuPoint® Advanced Next Generation System hadn’t been released. However, as a ATP-only assay, the newer system is also incapable of detecting ADP and AMP.

                    In addition to testing a surface that had been exposed to Mustard, the four systems also tested surfaces that had been exposed to the following food products.

                    Hygiena EnSure Touch

                    Lumitester A3 Smart System

                    3M Clean-Trace System

                    Neogen AccuPoint®

                    Mustard

                    0 RLU

                    Passed

                    4813 RLU

                    Failed

                    26 RLU

                    Passed

                    22 RLU

                    Passed

                    Peanut Butter

                    0 RLU

                    Passed

                    968 RLU

                    Failed

                    26 RLU

                    Passed

                    30 RLU

                    Passed

                    Hazelnut

                    7 RLU

                    Passed

                    13511 RLU

                    Failed

                    29 RLU

                    Passed

                    43 RLU

                    Passed

                    Soy beans

                    7 RLU

                    Passed

                    9917 RLU

                    Failed

                    27 RLU

                    Passed

                    43 RLU

                    Passed

                    Shrimp

                    34413 RLU

                    Passed

                    87294 RLU

                    Failed

                    80018 RLU

                    Passed

                    6153 RLU

                    Passed

                    Scallops

                    1127 RLU

                    Failed

                    737543 RLU

                    Failed

                    1127 RLU

                    Failed

                    14 RLU

                    Passed

                    Sardines

                    0 RLU

                    Passed

                    999999 RLU

                    Failed

                    44 RLU

                    Passed

                    27 RLU

                    Passed

                    Yoghurt

                    2820 RLU

                    Failed

                    38078 RLU

                    Failed

                    21394 RLU

                    Failed

                    718 RLU

                    Failed

                    Cheese

                    0 RLU

                    Passed

                    24282 RLU

                    Failed

                    23 RLU

                    Passed

                    11 RLU

                    Passed

                    Chocolate

                    375 RLU 

                    Failed

                    8979 RLU

                    Failed

                    153 RLU

                    Caution

                    109 RLU

                    Passed

                    Ice cream

                    682 RLU

                    Failed

                    41882 RLU

                    Failed

                    1526 RLU

                    Failed

                    6 RLU

                    Passed

                    Bread

                    0 RLU

                    Passed

                    1128 RLU

                    Failed

                    20 RLU

                    Passed

                    46 RLU

                    Passed

                    As you can see, the A3 system is the only system capable of accurately detecting the organic residue and generating a fail result. In contrast, because the levels of ATP are so low, the other three systems regularly passed surfaces that were in need of further cleaning.


                    So that brings us to the end of our honest comparison of the A3 system and its three main competitors. We hope that you can now see the key areas to consider when finding the right approach to Hygiene Monitoring for your site.

                    As you move forward with your decision, the Klipspringer team would be happy to provide support. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                    If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                      Allergen Tests

                      Allergen Tests: An Honest Comparison of Four Lateral Flow Immunoassays

                      This guide provides an honest comparison of four of the leading Rapid Allergen Lateral Flow Test Kits - helping you to make the right decision for your food production site.

                      From cost and efficiency to detection accuracy and storage conditions, there are so many factors to consider when it comes to evaluating your choice of Allergen Tests. With so many Rapid Lateral Flow Kits available on the market, we wanted to take a closer look at four of the most popular options – assessing the benefits and limitations of each methodology.

                      But first, we want to be upfront and draw your attention to the fact that our own range of Rapid Allergen Lateral Flow Tests are included in this article. Whenever we expand our product range, we carry out extensive research and set ourselves the goal of resolving common pain points – supplying our customers with benefits they haven’t seen before.

                      When you combine this attitude with our commitment to honesty and integrity, we hope that you can see why we have no interest in diverting you away from the other options on the market or restricting your access to information. With a matter as important as allergen control, we believe the focus should always be on safeguarding your operation and protecting the consumer. 

                      In this article we will be answering the questions listed below. There is helpful content in each section, but you can also use the following links to skip to the subject most relevant to your site.

                      How simple are the different tests?

                      This is an important point to consider, as the more straightforward a testing process is, the easier your roll out will be. Instead of struggling to train up your operatives and maintain standards, you will only have a simple process to explain. A simple test also allows you to drive efficiency, save on the long term costs of wasted time, and reduce the risk of human error.

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      This two-step test is the simplest and quickest process out of the four methodologies featured in this article:

                      1. Swab the specified surface area, then return the swab to the bottle it came in and shake.
                      2. Place a test stick horizontally. Flip open the lid of the bottle containing the swab. Using the bottle’s built-in droplet dispenser, squeeze four drops of the test solution onto the test stick and wait for your result.

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks

                      1. Transfer 0.5ml of the Extraction Buffer Solution into the Extraction Tube.
                      2. If you are testing a surface using a swab, you will need to moisten the tip of the swab with the Buffer Solution before swabbing a 10 x 10cm area. Put the swab into the extraction tube, snapping off the end. Alternatively, if you are testing rinse water, you will need to use a pipette to add 0.5ml of the sample to the extraction tube. In both instances, you will then add 4.5ml of the Extraction Buffer Solution and shake for 20 seconds.
                      3. Allow the test sample to settle for 2 minutes.
                      4. Using a pipette, add 10 drops of the test sample to a testing well, then place the end of an Allergen Test Stick into the sample. Wait for your result.

                      3M™ Allergen Protein Rapid Tests

                      1. Add 800 microlitres of Extraction Buffer Solution to a microcentrifuge tube.
                      2. If you are testing rinse water, add 200 microlitres of your sample and shake for 15 seconds. For surface swabs, you will need to pre-moisten the swab with the Buffer Solution if you are testing a dry area. Once you have swabbed the surface area, add the swab to the sample tube, swirling it around the edge before breaking off the swab tip and closing the cap. Shake for 15 seconds.
                      3. Place a test stick horizontally. Use a pipette to transfer the sample from the microcentrifuge tube to the device and wait for your result.

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      The test procedures for the different kits within this range may vary depending on the allergen being tested for. In the interest of providing an example, the following process is used for a Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Test for Peanuts.

                      1. Remove the test kit from the refrigerator and wait for it to reach room temperate (20-30 minutes)
                      2. Add the Extraction Buffer Solution to the sample tube.
                      3. If you are testing rinse water, add 0.25ml of your rinse sample to the tube and shake for one minute. For surface swabs, you will need to pre-moisten the swab if you are testing a dry area. Once you have swabbed the surface, add the swab to the sample tube and shake for 1 minute.
                      4. Take off the lid of the sample tube, then pour the sample into the lid until it is full. Take care not to include any froth.
                      5. Dip the head of the Neogen® Reveal® 3-D device into the lid. Hold the device in place until the sample reaches the test window. As soon as this happens, lay the device flat and wait for it to generate a result.

                      What equipment is included in the Allergen Testing Kits?

                      The amount of equipment included in each Allergen Test Kit is a good indicator of how complex or simple the testing process is.

                      You should also pay close attention to the mention of additional equipment, as this is something that you will need to factor into the overall cost of your allergen testing.

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      As a two-step test, only two components are needed in this kit. A pack of ten includes:

                      • 10 test sticks
                      • 10 swab kits

                      Aside from a standard pipette for the testing of rinse water samples, the process doesn’t involve any additional consumables. Most notably, the process does not require an Extraction Buffer Solution.

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      The contents of each kit will vary slightly depending on the allergen that is being tested for. Using the example of a Reveal® 3-D allergen test for Peanut, a pack of ten includes:

                      • 10 Reveal® 3-D devices
                      • 10 Sachets of extraction buffer
                      • 10 sample tubes and caps
                      • 10 swab kits
                      • One bottle of swab wetting solution

                      In terms of additional equipment, you may also require a 250 litre and 1,000 litre pipette.

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks

                      If ordered in packs of ten, the kits within this range include:

                      • 10 immunochromatographic sticks
                      • 10 sample collection tubes
                      • 10 sample extraction buffer tubes
                      • 10 spoons
                      • 10 pipettes for testing liquid samples
                      • 10 small pipettes
                      • 10 swabs for testing surfaces

                      The process doesn’t involve any additional consumables.

                      3M™ Allergen Protein Rapid Tests

                      If ordered in packs of 25, the kits within this range include:

                      • 25 lateral flow devices
                      • Allergen Specific Extraction Buffer
                      • Dilution Tubes

                      Aside from a pipette, the process doesn’t involve any additional consumables.

                      How long does it take for the results to be generated?

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      The allergen tests within this range take 10 minutes to generate a result. The process also eliminates time consuming steps such as waiting for the tests to reach room temperature and preparing samples with the use of an Extraction Buffer Solution. Consequently, these tests offer the fastest overall testing time of any of the methods featured in this comparison.

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      When it comes to actually generating a result, the Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests take just 5 minutes. However, this is before you factor in the sample preparation time, with this process requiring you to bring your tests to room temperature for around 20 to 30 minutes before use. As mentioned previously in this article, you also need to carry out additional steps such as preparing your swabs with a wetting solution and mixing your sample with an Extraction Buffer Solution for one minute.

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks

                      AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks take 10 minutes to generate a result. Again, it is important to factor in the time it takes to prepare the samples being tested, as following this process, you will need to mix your sample with an Extraction Buffer Solution, shake for twenty seconds, then allow to sit for an additional two minutes.

                      3M™ Allergen Protein Rapid Tests

                      Finally, the 3M™ tests take around 11 minutes to generate a result. Also reliant on an Extraction Buffer Solution, they involve a lengthy preparation process, tasking you with preparing the swab, mixing your sample with an extraction solution, before transferring the finished solution to the Lateral Flow Device.

                      What is the Detection Accuracy of the Allergen Tests?

                      Another important point to consider is the detection accuracy of your Allergen Tests. The more accurate your tests are, the easier it will be for your site to achieve reliable and repeatable results.

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      All the allergen tests within this range offer a detection accuracy of at least 0.5ppm.

                      However, the Gluten and Casein Allergen Tests offers a heightened accuracy of 0.4ppm.

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      This range offers varying degrees of accuracy depending on the allergen being tested for. Examples include:

                      • Gluten: 5ppm
                      • Soy Protein: 2.5ppm & Total Soy: 5ppm
                      • Egg Protein: 2.4ppm & Total Egg: 5ppm

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks

                      This range offers varying degrees of accuracy depending on the allergen being tested for. Examples include:

                      • Casein: 2.5ppm
                      • Peanut: 1ppm
                      • Crustacean: 10ppm
                      • Egg: 1.25ppm

                      3M™ Allergen Protein Rapid Tests

                      This range offers varying degrees of accuracy depending on the allergen being tested for. Examples include:

                      • Peanut: 1ppm
                      • Gluten: 5ppm
                      • Soy: 2ppm
                      • Egg white: 0.5ppm

                      Under what conditions should the Allergen Tests be stored and how long will they last?

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      Solving a common problem surrounding Lateral Flow Immunoassays, our range of Allergen Tests do not need to be refrigerated. Not only does this offer more options in terms of storage, but it also eliminates the time consuming task of waiting for the tests to reach room temperature before use.

                      Instead, they can be stored within the temperature range of 2-30°C. Under these conditions, the tests should last approximately 12 months from the date of despatch.

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      The tests within this range need to be refrigerated – kept at a temperature of 2-8℃.

                      3M™ Allergen Rapid Tests

                      The tests within this range need to be refrigerated – kept at a temperature of 2-8℃. Under these conditions, the tests should have a shelf life of 24 months.

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks do not need to be refrigerated. Instead, they can be stored within the temperature range of 2-25°C. Under these conditions, the tests should last a maximum of 9 months from the date of manufacture.

                      How much do the Allergen Tests cost?

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      The allergen test kits within this range are available in packs of ten tests. If you order 1-9 packs, they will cost £109 per pack.

                      However, if you order over ten packs, they will cost £95.38 per pack.

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      The allergen test kits within this range are available in packs of ten and the cost varies depending on the supplier you work with.

                      In the interest of providing an example, a leading supplier prices a pack of ten at around £130 (including VAT).

                      Hygiena AlerTox® Allergen Test Sticks

                      The allergen test kits within this range are available in packs of five, ten, and twenty-five. The cost varies depending on the supplier you work with.

                      In the interest of providing an example, a leading supplier prices the kits at around £80 for a pack of five – £280 for a pack of 25 (including VAT).

                      3M™ Allergen Protein Rapid Tests

                      The allergen test kits within this range are available in packs of 25 and the cost varies depending on the supplier you work with.

                      In the interest of providing an example, a leading supplier prices the kits at around £350 (including VAT).

                      In Conclusion

                      Now that we have covered the key areas of comparison for four of the most popular rapid allergen test kits, we hope that you have come away with the information you need to secure the best solution for your site.

                      The table below provides an overview of the information shared in this article.

                      Honesty and integrity are core values here at Klipspringer and we never want to stand in the way of you accessing the information you need. With that in mind, you can click on the following links if you would like to be taken directly to the website of each supplier:

                      Klipspringer's Range of Allergen Tests

                      Neogen® Reveal® 3-D Allergen Tests

                      Hygiena AlerTox®  Sticks

                      3M™ Allergen Protein Rapid Tests

                      Simplicity

                      Simple, two-step process

                      Additional step for sample extraction

                      Additional step for sample extraction

                      Additional step for sample extraction

                      Additional Equipment

                      Pipette for rinse water

                      250 litre and 1,000 litre pipette

                      n/a

                      Pipette

                      Cost

                      <10 packs = £109 per pack >10 packs = 95.38 per pack

                      Leading supplier prices a pack of ten at approx £130

                      Leading supplier prices a pack of five at approx £80 and a pack of twenty-five at approx £280

                      Leading supplier prices a pack of twenty-five at approx £350

                      Storage Conditions

                       2-30°C (don't need to be refridgerated)

                       2-8°C (needs to be refridgerated)

                       2-25°C (don't need to be refridgerated)

                       2-8°C (needs to be refridgerated)

                      Lifespan of Swabs

                      Approx 12 months from date of despatch

                      n/a

                      Maximum of 9 months from date of manufacture

                      Approx 24 months

                      Speed of Results

                      10 minutes

                      5 minutes (requires 20-30 mins to reach room temp, plus time needed for preparation of sample)

                      10 minutes      (plus time needed for preparation of sample)

                      11 minutes (requires 20-30 mins to reach room temp, plus time needed for preparation of sample)

                      View our full range of Allergen Testing Kits

                      If there are any areas where you would like further guidance, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. Simply contact our team on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the form below.  

                      You can also use the form below to register your interest for a range of allergen tests that are capable of testing product samples, along with a range of ELISA tests. Although we do not currently supply these products, we have plans to expand our testing range to reflect the specific needs of our customers. With this in mind, we would welcome your feedback.

                      If you would like further guidance relating to the products referenced in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                        Test Pieces

                        How to Choose, Use and Care for Your Metal Detector Test Pieces

                        From finding the right Test Pieces for your site to extending their lifespan, this guide covers everything you need to know about this essential tool for validating your metal detectors.

                        Metal Detectors can help food production sites to prevent product tampering, reduce the risk of foreign body contamination, improve food safety, safeguard brand reputation, and protect customers. By avoiding spoiled product or even recalls, sites can also drive efficiency and reduce costs. However, none of this would be possible if the Metal Detectors in question are faulty – unable to detect metal contaminants and leaving your operatives with a false sense of security. This is where Metal Detectable Test Pieces prove invaluable.

                        By running certified test pieces through your metal detector, you can ascertain if the machine is functioning properly. If it is, the test piece should trigger your detector, rejecting the product pack containing the test piece before it moves any further through your production line.

                        With the consequences of foreign body contamination so severe, it is no surprise that most sites test their metal detectors at the start and end of each run, and will carry out further tests whenever production switches over to a new product. It is also recommended to use test pieces at three points – the front, middle, and end of the batch that is moving through your detector.

                        But, which test pieces are suited to your operation and how do you extend their lifespan?

                        We will be answering these questions and more in the following guide, covering everything you need to know about Metal Detectable Test Pieces and their role at your site.

                        BRCGS Requirements - Clause 4.10.3.4

                        "Metal detector testing procedures shall, at a minimum include:

                        • Use of test pieces incorporating a sphere of metal of a known diameter selected on the basis of risk. The test pieces shall be marked with the size and type of the test material contained.
                        • Tests will be carried out using separate test pieces containing ferrous metal, stainless steel, and typically non-ferrous metal, unless the product is within a foil container where a ferrous-only test may be applicable."

                         

                        [EXTRACT ONLY]

                        First, let’s take a closer look at the guidance included in Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. Here, the Standard emphasises the importance of checking your metal detectors – using test pieces that have been selected following a thorough risk assessment. Your auditor will expect to see a clear correlation between the risks at your site and the test pieces you have decided to use. Otherwise, your testing will be deemed insufficient. We will be covering the process of finding the right test piece later in this article.

                        The second stipulation is that sites use a combination of ferrous, non-ferrous, and stainless steel test pieces. Here, it’s important to note that sites testing products within foil containers, for example, could be a possible exception, as in this case a ferrous-only test piece will be required. If we use the example of foil containers, this is because aluminium is a non-ferrous metal that would trigger a standard detector. In contrast, a ferrous-specific detector will pass over the aluminium, only triggered by ferrous metals such as cast iron, steel, and steel alloys.

                        What type of contaminant do I need?

                        The material of your test piece will be determined by the type of metal your detector is capable of identifying. As outlined in Clause 4.10.3.4 of the BRCGS Standard, this will be dependant on whether or not your product/packaging contains any metal.

                        If it doesn’t, you will require a metal detector that is capable of detecting ferrous and non-ferrous metals, along with stainless steel. However, if your product/packaging does include a metal, e.g. a ready meal in an aluminium container, you will need a metal-specific detector and test pieces to reflect this.

                        Below, we have explored three of the most popular contaminants. However, here at Klipspringer, we also supply: 304 Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Phosphor Bronze, Soda Lime Glass, Crystal glass, Ceramic, Teflon, and Nylon.

                        Ferrous

                        Ferrous-specific metal detectors detect both ferrous metals and magnetic stainless steel. Examples of ferrous metals include:

                        • Cast Iron
                        • Steel
                        • Steel alloys

                        If your site is using a ferrous-specific metal detector, it’s important that you are using test pieces from this range, as your detector is not going to be triggered by a non-ferrous option.

                        Non-Ferrous

                        Examples of non-ferrous metals include:

                        • Copper
                        • Brass
                        • Aluminium
                        • Lead

                        As previously mentioned, aluminium is a popular choice for product packaging, so non-ferrous test pieces are typically reserved for sites that don’t have any approved metals moving through their production line.

                        Stainless Steel

                        It is likely that stainless steel will have been flagged as a possible metal contaminant in your HACCP plan. This is because it is often used as a material for production equipment such as:

                        • Scrapers & Spatulas
                        • Knives

                        Due to its non-magnetic properties, a stainless steel test piece is difficult to detect. This is why auditors like to see it included in your testing.

                        What are the available sizes?

                        The size of your test piece will be determined by the sensitivity of your metal detector, with this determined by the ‘background signal’ generated by your product. Dry products such as pasta and biscuits produce an extremely low background signal when they pass through a detector, whereas wet products such as dairy and ready meals generate a much higher signal.

                        As you can imagine a product with a strong background signal will require a less sensitive detector, otherwise the metal detector would be triggered constantly. In contrast, a product with a weak background signal will be able to pass through a more sensitive detector without setting it off.

                        The size of your test piece will need to sit at the lowest limit of your metal detector’s sensitivity, as this will allow you to validate the detector’s ability to pick up on a foreign body of that size.

                        In our range of Ferrous, Non-Ferrous, and Stainless Steel test pieces, the following sizes are held in stock for same day despatch:

                        0.5mm, 1mm, 1.2mm, 1.5mm, 1.8mm, 2mm, 2.5mm, 3mm, 3.5mm, 4mm, 4.5mm, 5mm, 5.5mm, 6mm, 6.5mm, 7mm, 7.5mm, 8mm, 9mm, 10mm, 11mm, 12mm, 13mm, 14mm,    15mm, 20mm.

                        The Ferrous Test Pieces are also available for same day despatch in sizes 1.6mm and 8.5mm, the Non-Ferrous Test Pieces in sizes 2.8mm and 6.35mm, and the Stainless Steel Test Pieces in 8.5mm.

                        These sizes are also possible for the other contaminants, but are not held in stock for same day despatch.

                        As for our extended range of contaminants (304 Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Phosphor Bronze, Soda Lime Glass, Crystal glass, Ceramic, Teflon, and Nylon), we can supply them in any size. The only difference is that they are not available for same day despatch.

                        Are there any bespoke shapes & sizes available?

                        Although test wands are the most popular test piece, they are by no means the only option available. Other examples include:

                        • Test Sleeves: typically used in conjunction with product trays
                        • Test Paddles and T-Bars: typically used for bottles and jars
                        • Test Discs: typically used for packaged products or products moving in bulk
                        • Test Cards: typically used for bagged products or products moving in bulk
                        • Test Wands: typically used for products on a conveyor belt
                        • Test Torpedos: typically used for products that undergo a free fall
                        • Test Cubes: typically used for products moving in bulk

                        When it comes to metal detection within the food industry, it’s not always as simple as running a standard test piece through your machine. There are a wide variety of factors that could influence the detectability of metals, such as the orientation and shape of the foreign body. That is why you need to make sure your test pieces are reflective of the unique risks to your operation.

                        Extending the lifespan of your Test Pieces

                        One of the most common queries we receive relating to Metal Detectable Test Pieces is: how to extend their lifespan? From conveyor belts filled with items moving in bulk to products that undergo a significant free fall, it is common for test pieces to be exposed to regular wear and tear.

                        It is no surprise then that so many sites prioritise durability. After all, a chipped or damaged test piece could become a serious point of non-conformity.

                        What are the most durable Test Pieces?

                        Although all test pieces offer a certain amount of resilience, selecting the correct shape and size for your specific application is an easy way to improve the chances of them standing the test of time.

                        You should also pay close attention to the housing of your test piece, in particular the material it has been made from. For example, we supply a range of ferrous, non-ferrous, and stainless steel test pieces that have been made from shatter resistant PTFE – offering additional protection from chips and scratches.

                        How do I store my Test Pieces?

                        Even if you select the perfect test pieces for your site – opting for a design that offers optimum durability – you will still need to consider the way in which they are being stored. All too often equipment is damaged due to improper storage conditions, so it’s important to get this right. One solution is a customised Critical Control Point Station with a set storage area for your test pieces. This will ensure your test pieces are easily accessible, but will also lower the risk of them going missing or being exposed to unnecessary damage.

                        Keeping your test pieces in plain site will also make it easier for you to identify any signs of degradation, giving you the opportunity to put preventative measures in place and encourage accountability amongst your operatives. Click here to learn more about our wide range of storage solutions.

                        What are the key training points for my team?

                        Any site that uses a metal detector needs to pay close attention to its culture. Far too often operatives view metal detection as the ultimate safeguard and an excuse for a lack of vigilance elsewhere.

                        To avoid this, you need to highlight the importance of ‘prevention before detection’, an ethos that will encourage your site staff to reduce the risk of foreign body contamination at every point of the production process.

                        You can also secure the engagement of your operatives by emphasising the fact that thorough testing will save time and effort in the long run. After all, running a test sample through a detector is a lot less involved than dealing with contaminated products or a recall. Your site staff will also need to take proper care of the test pieces. The storage solution mentioned above will help with this. You should also consider Visual Management solutions to remind your team of the correct way to use the test pieces i.e. where they should be placed, how they should be positioned, and how they should be cleaned after use.

                        So that brings us to the end of our guide to using and caring for the Metal Detectable Test Pieces at your factory. As you work through your list of priorities and weigh up the different options available, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help.

                        From providing the necessary certification to helping you to evaluate the sensitivity of your detectors, we can provide support at every level. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                        If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                          Allergen Testing

                          Allergen Testing and the A3 System

                          Data published in 2016 by iFAAM (Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Management) revealed that 60% of recalls or withdrawals within the food industry were the result of allergen notifications. Not only does this figure highlight the importance of allergen management, but it also suggests that many sites are struggling to succeed in this area.

                          In an effort to tackle this problem, a growing number of factories are reevaluating their approach to allergen control – eager to enhance their operation and stay abreast of the latest technology.

                          As a system that can NOT be used for the direct detection of allergens, you may be surprised to learn that the A3 methodology is being incorporated into allergen management programs across the world – helping sites to reduce costs, fill the gaps of their current system, make life easier for their operatives, and secure more accurate results.

                          The reason for this is fairly simple: Proper Cleaning = Reduced Risk of Allergen Cross-Contact

                          In this article, we will take a closer look at the science behind this tried-and-tested approach.


                          Plus, before reading any further, you can also follow the link below to watch a webinar on Hygiene Monitoring in High Care Environments. Hosted by Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon, our in-house A3 specialist Radek Tameczka, and scientific advisor Dr. Stephan Speidel, this webinar explores the limitations of conventional hygiene monitoring methods and provides real-world examples of A3 verification at High Care production sites.

                          How do you ensure the cleans at your site are effective?

                          This involves a two step process:

                          Cleaning Validation

                          At this point, you assess the effectiveness of your site’s Sanitation Standard Operating Procedure (SSOP). Essentially, you prove the cleaning methods performed at your factory are effective in removing allergens and reducing the risk of cross contamination.

                          Depending on the applications and risk levels at your site, this process will typically be carried out by Lateral Flow Immunoassays or ELISA tests, as these methodologies target specific allergens.

                          Cleaning Verification

                          Once the validation process has taken place, you will need to find a suitable method for verifying your cleaning program. This will typically occur on a daily basis, so it is important to find a quick, easy-to-use, and low-cost approach that doesn’t compromise on accuracy.

                          Again, a lot will rely on the applications and risk levels of a site, but the most popular options for daily verification are visual inspection, ATP tests, protein-specific swabs, and the A3 system.

                          What are the different testing methods?

                          Allergen-Specific Testing

                          A survey carried out by Food Safety Magazine revealed that 18% of food production sites rely entirely on allergen-specific tests. With examples including ELISA, PCT, and Mass Spectrometry, these methods are highly sensitive and specific. However, they are also unsuited to a busy production space. Instead, they often require specialist equipment, on-site laboratories, and highly trained personnel. ELISA testing, for example, involves complex calculations using standard curves, and Mass Spectrometry involves the analysis of large quantities of data.

                          These limitations have led many sites to incorporate rapid testing methods into their allergen control program. This doesn’t always involve stepping away from the highly specific tests mentioned above, with sites often turning to rapid testing as a means of reducing the frequency of use for the more complex methodologies.

                          Although sites have the option of using a mix of both complex and rapid testing options, the survey also revealed that 13% of sites rely on a combination of rapid tests, 36% rely on ATP testing, and 17% rely on protein-specific tests. This means that 66% of participating sites rely solely on rapid testing methods such as protein swabs, Lateral Flow Immunoassays, and ATP tests.

                          Protein-Specific Testing

                          When someone is allergic to a certain food, they will experience an allergic reaction if their immune system recognises the relevant proteins.

                          This helps to explain why such a large percentage of sites use protein-specific tests for their allergen management. However, this approach also comes with limitations, as protein-specific tests are qualitative and can only generate non-specific, non-numerical results. Sites will also see a reduced efficiency when protein swabs are tasked with detecting a substance that has low levels of residual protein contamination.

                          Click the button below for an in depth look at the benefits and limitations of protein-specific tests.

                          Lateral Flow Immunoassays

                          Lateral Flow Immunoassays are another popular choice for allergen testing. Designed with the detection of specific substances in mind, this approach is similar to the more complex methodologies mentioned above. However, it generates rapid results and doesn’t require any expensive or complex equipment.

                          The fact that Lateral Flow Tests detect specific substances is incredibly useful; however, this can also be a drawback for sites that are unable to find a LFI that targets the allergen they handle. This is also a common issue with ELISA testing.

                          Another limitation of LFIs is that due to their specificity, they are unable to assess several allergens simultaneously. In fact, if there is more than one allergen to assess, sites will have to cover the cost of multiple LFIs for all the different allergens at play.

                          If you would like to further explore the role of Lateral Flow Tests, it is worth noting that we have launched a new range of Rapid Allergen Test Kits for: Egg (Ovalbumin), Casein, Gluten, Soya, Peanut, Crustacean, and Buckwheat.

                          The kits within this range offer the following benefits:

                          • Minimum accuracy rate of 0.5ppm
                          • Simple, two-step process (eliminates Extraction Buffer Solution)
                          • Assay time of 10 minutes
                          • Stored at 2-30°C (no need for fridge)
                          • Lifespan of 12 months

                          ATP Tests

                          Despite being unable to directly detect specific allergens, the survey revealed that ATP testing was the most popular methodology for food production sites. This is due to an understanding that if the concentration of surface-bound ATP is reduced below a defined value, a surface can be declared clean and free of allergens.

                          This is a common misconception.

                          Appendix 10 of the FDA’s guidance for Cleaning and Sanitation For the Control of Allergens actually advises against a total reliance on ATP testing for cleaning verification in relation to allergens. The reason given is that ATP is not present in all foods and is not a specific indicator for allergens.

                          Consequently, sites that are relying solely on ATP testing could be working with surfaces and equipment that are still contaminated with organic residue, and most worryingly, allergens.

                          The A3 System

                          In response to the limitations of ATP testing, Kikkoman Biochemifa launched a new hygiene monitoring technology in 2017: the A3 system. As with ATP tests, this system does not directly test for allergens. However, unlike conventional ATP tests, it is able to detect all organic residue. This means that it can help to monitor the risks of allergen contamination.

                          As the A3 system is a more recent technology, you can find an explanation of how the system works and how it can support your allergen control program below.

                          What is the A3 system and how does it work?

                          The A3 system consists of the A3 Lumitester Smart unit and Lucipac Swabs. The unit itself is used in a similar way to conventional ATP tests. Lightweight, app based, handheld, and autocalibrated, all you need to do is run your choice of swab across the relevant test point, insert it into the meter, and wait around ten seconds for a result. Before this, you will have worked with our Technical Support Team to establish your bespoke pass/fail limits, and it is these limits that allow the unit to determine if the surface has passed or if it is contaminated and in need of further cleaning.

                          It’s the Lucipac Swabs that really set the A3 system apart from conventional ATP tests. This is because they introduce recycling enzymes that allow for conversion between all three adenosine molecules: ATP, ADP, and AMP. As a result, the readings you receive relate to the total organic residue on a surface. This will be the case even after the degradation of ATP has taken place.

                          Depending on your application, there are three types of swabs to choose from:  Surface Swabs, Water Swabs, or Pre-moistened Surface Swabs.

                          How could the A3 system support allergen management at your site?

                          Reliable Results

                          The A3 system generates accurate and reliable results under a wide range of conditions – even after the organic residue it is testing for has been exposed to processes such as cleaning, heating, blanching, and fermentation. This is not the case for all rapid testing options.

                          The graph below offers a comparison of the A3 system and protein swabs when detecting raw fish and meat residue on a stainless steel surface.

                          The orange markers reflect the four points at which the testing was carried out. The first test was taken before the surface was washed, the second after a fifteen second rinse with cold water, the third after a fifteen second rinse with 50°C water, and the fourth after the surface was cleaned with detergent and a sponge.

                          The benchmark value of 200 RLU was put in place for the A3 system, and it was only after the final test that the reading fell below this value and the surface was confirmed to be clean. In contrast, the protein swab was only sensitive enough to detect residue before the first wash and detected only a trace of meat after the second.

                          Here we can see that the results of protein-specific tests are compromised if the denaturation of proteins occurs through processes such as thermal processing or exposure to chemical agents. In contrast, the A3 system continued to generate accurate readings throughout.

                          Heightened Sensitivity - Part One

                          The following diagram offers a comparison of the A3 system, protein swabs, ATP tests, and Lateral Flow Immunoassays when detecting peanut residue.

                          To generate these results, 10g portions of peanuts were mixed with 90ml of sterile distilled water and homogenised to form 10-fold dilutions, before 10-fold serial dilutions were carried out.

                          With 100 RLU as the established action level, the calculated concentration equivalents are displayed below. The concentration of total protein was also evaluated by the ELISA and Bradford assays to produce the theoretical dilution factors that are plotted with the blue and red Xs.

                          The results of this experiment revealed that:

                          • The ATP tests could detect samples between a 10¹-fold and 10²-fold dilution
                          • The protein swab test could detect samples up to a 10²-fold dilution
                          • The Lateral Flow Immunoassays could detect samples up to a 10⁵-fold dilution
                          • The A3 system could detect samples between a 10⁵-fold and 10⁶-fold dilution

                          As you can see, only the Lateral Flow Immunoassays and the A3 system were sensitive enough to detect the 10ppm (parts per million) levels of peanut protein calculated by the ELISA and Bradford assays, with the A3 system proving to be the most sensitive of the four methodologies.

                          Heightened Sensitivity - Part Two

                          The graphs below show the different levels of Luminescence Intensity (RLU) registered by both the A3 system and conventional ATP tests when testing the same surfaces. As you will see, the surfaces were tested for a number of different allergens:

                          In all eight instances, the readings generated by the A3 system were more than double the readings generated by the ATP tests. If we use the example of raw shrimp, we can see that the conventional ATP test generated an RLU value of well below 100,000, whereas the A3 system generated a reading of around 450,000 RLU.

                          Building on this data, it is clear that depending on the pass/fail limits of a site, there is every chance that the ATP tests would be incorrectly passing surfaces or equipment that are in need of further cleaning.

                          The video below offers a comparison of the A3 system and three of the leading ATP models when testing a surface contaminated with Mustard – one of the 14 major allergens.

                          Similar tests were also carried out on surfaces contaminated with peanut butter, hazelnut, soy beans, shrimp, scallops, sardines, yoghurt, cheese, chocolate, ice cream, and bread.

                          As you will see, despite the surfaces being contaminated to the point that they would fail a visual inspection, only the A3 system generated a fail result with every test. In contrast, the ATP systems were unable to detect ADP and AMP, so regularly passed surfaces that were in need of further cleaning.

                          Hygiena EnSure Touch

                          Lumitester A3 Smart System

                          3M Clean-Trace System

                          Neogen AccuPoint®

                          Mustard

                          0 RLU

                          Passed

                          4813 RLU

                          Failed

                          26 RLU

                          Passed

                          22 RLU

                          Passed

                          Peanut Butter

                          0 RLU

                          Passed

                          968 RLU

                          Failed

                          26 RLU

                          Passed

                          30 RLU

                          Passed

                          Hazelnut

                          7 RLU

                          Passed

                          13511 RLU

                          Failed

                          29 RLU

                          Passed

                          43 RLU

                          Passed

                          Soy beans

                          7 RLU

                          Passed

                          9917 RLU

                          Failed

                          27 RLU

                          Passed

                          43 RLU

                          Passed

                          Shrimp

                          34413 RLU

                          Passed

                          87294 RLU

                          Failed

                          80018 RLU

                          Passed

                          6153 RLU

                          Passed

                          Scallops

                          1127 RLU

                          Failed

                          737543 RLU

                          Failed

                          1127 RLU

                          Failed

                          14 RLU

                          Passed

                          Sardines

                          0 RLU

                          Passed

                          999999 RLU

                          Failed

                          44 RLU

                          Passed

                          27 RLU

                          Passed

                          Yoghurt

                          2820 RLU

                          Failed

                          38078 RLU

                          Failed

                          21394 RLU

                          Failed

                          718 RLU

                          Failed

                          Cheese

                          0 RLU

                          Passed

                          24282 RLU

                          Failed

                          23 RLU

                          Passed

                          11 RLU

                          Passed

                          Chocolate

                          375 RLU 

                          Failed

                          8979 RLU

                          Failed

                          153 RLU

                          Caution

                          109 RLU

                          Passed

                          Ice cream

                          682 RLU

                          Failed

                          41882 RLU

                          Failed

                          1526 RLU

                          Failed

                          6 RLU

                          Passed

                          Bread

                          0 RLU

                          Passed

                          1128 RLU

                          Failed

                          20 RLU

                          Passed

                          46 RLU

                          Passed

                          Strengthen your Allergen Control Program

                          As previously mentioned, although the A3 system does NOT directly test for allergens, its ability to detect all organic residue does mean that it can support the other testing carried out at your site.

                          Whilst conventional ATP tests could pass a surface only for your allergen-specific tests to fail it, the A3 system will help you to accurately predict the results of your next round of testing. This is particularly useful if your site relies on tests that take a long time to generate results and are often carried out off site.

                          This graph depicts the correlation between results generated by the A3 system and an ELISA test for milk protein. The readings were taken throughout the cleaning process.

                          • Square: before washing
                          • Triangle: after first wash
                          • Circle: after final wash

                          The ELISA test produced a reading of 10-40 μg before the first wash and 0.1 μgo or less after the final wash. Mirroring this trajectory, the A3 test indicated 10³ to 2 x 10⁵ RLU before washing and less than 100 RLU after the final wash.

                          Case Study: McCain Foods

                          One of the key motivating factors behind McCain Foods undergoing an A3 trial was the fact that its Scarborough site was in the process of revalidating its entire cleaning regime in support of effective allergen management. Due to growing demand from consumers, the company had been steadily developing a series of gluten-free products and wanted to ensure its approach to Hygiene Monitoring was accurate and reliable.

                          During the validation process, McCain Foods decided to carry out testing before cleaning. These tests included rapid-tests, allergen-specific tests and ELISA tests. Post-clean, visual checks were also carried out. If the surface passed, conventional ATP tests were used, then if the surface passed, an allergen-specific test was used, and finally, if the surface passed, a sample was sent away for ELISA testing.

                          During this process, an interim technical person identified a series of confusing results generated by the conventional ATP tests. These conventional tests indicated that a blanched potato didn’t contain any ATP. They also passed surfaces that were failing visual checks. In contrast, the A3 system was able to accurately detect organic residue – failing surfaces that the ATP tests had been passing.

                          Over a six-to-eight-month period, McCain Foods found that if a surface passed an A3 test it would go on to pass a gluten swab and then an ELISA test. During this period, the company didn’t see a single allergen fail following an A3 swab pass. This gave McCains the confidence to reduce the amount of allergen swabbing and ELISA testing carried out, saving money and speeding up the process of releasing their product line. 

                          We hope that you now have a greater understanding of the relationship between allergen testing and the A3 system. As we have made clear throughout this article, the system itself does not test for specific allergens; however, it could play a major role in your allergen control program.

                          If you would like further guidance in this area or would be interested in learning more about the A3 system mentioned in this article, you can contact us on 01473461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                          If you would like to learn more about the A3 system, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                            In-Process Validation Loggers: Finding the Right System

                            In this article, we explore the five key areas to consider when selecting In-Process Validation Loggers for your food factory.

                            Designed to withstand the harsh environment of a food or beverage production site, In-Process Validation Loggers are capable of a wide range of functions, including:

                            • Accurate temperature profiling
                            • HACCP validation
                            • Rapid calculation of both F0 and PU values
                            • Mapping the efficiency of your equipment

                            Although In-Process Validation Loggers as a whole are capable of the above, there are vital differences between the models on the market, with different loggers suited to different applications.

                            With this in mind, it’s important to avoid a one-size-fits-all approach. Instead, you need to consider the distinctions between each instrument, starting with the five key areas listed below.

                            What parameters do you want to measure?

                            First, consider the parameters your In-Process Validation Logger needs to measure. The most popular choice tends to be temperature, with many sites wanting to monitor products that are moving through hot environments such as ovens, steamers, and smoke chambers. The lowest point of your temperature range will also be important if you are planning to monitor products that are moving through cool environments such as fridges and freezers. Remember to work closely with your equipment provider during the selection process, as some In-Process Validation Loggers have alternate temperature ranges to explore.

                            Of course, temperature isn’t the only parameter to measure. Sites also use In-Process Validation Loggers to monitor factors including humidity, pressure, and conductivity. Again, it’s important that you pay close attention to the parameters available, as they will need to line up with the applications at your site.

                            How many channels do you require?

                            Next, you need to think about how many channels your In-Process Validation Logger needs to provide. With some loggers offering just the one channel and some loggers reaching all the way up to twenty, there is an option for every application.

                            Sites will typically require a smaller number of channels if they are monitoring a specific product as it undergoes a specific process. For instance, a compact logger with just the one channel should fit perfectly inside a bottle, bag, or can – feeding back essential information without disrupting the production line or requiring any additional space.

                            Alternatively, if you wanted to map the efficiency of your equipment by carrying out a temperature uniformity survey, you would benefit from a logger with a higher number of channels to identify any cold or hot spots.

                            How much space do you have to work with?

                            As mentioned above, different In-Process Validation Loggers require different amounts of space.

                            For example, a Multi-Channel Logger typically sits inside a durable thermal barrier with thermocouples that are available in a wide range of needle dimensions and cable lengths.

                            What’s more, sites will often place Multi-Channel loggers inside accompanying food trays, as this makes it easier to set up the system and prevents it from moving around during use. A logger of this style requires a certain amount of space, so it’s important that you ensure your ovens, fryers, and belts have enough room for the equipment before making your selection.

                            If there is limited space at your site, there are still options available. In fact, you should be able to find a logger that is the ideal size for your application, with most loggers available in a number of different probe lengths. Although the larger probes tend to be more durable, a smaller probe will still have been designed with the harsh conditions of a food factory in mind. Here, you should look out for features such as stainless steel casing and IP68 protection.

                            If you are at all unsure about which logger will be suited to your site. simply contact our team on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com for any bespoke requirements. 

                            What applications do you need to monitor?

                            Another key consideration is the applications that take place at your site. From smoke chambers and rotating ovens to deep fat fryers and freezers, In-Process Validation Loggers are capable of monitoring a wide range of factory environments.

                            However, due to factors such as the temperature range, water resistance levels, and durability of each logger, you will need to confirm the model you have in mind is a suitable choice.

                            To give you an idea of the sheer number of applications that can be monitored using In-Process Validation loggers, we have listed some examples below, alongside the three popular models that are suited to each environment.

                            LEBI-11, LEBI-12, and Multi-Channel Loggers

                            • Water/Steam Autoclaves
                            • Pasteurisers
                            • Sterilisation Processes
                            • Smoke Chambers
                            • Freezers
                            • Steam Ovens

                            Multi-Channel Loggers

                            • Continuous Baking Ovens
                            • Batch Static and Rotating Ovens
                            • Continuous Linear and Spiral Cookers
                            • Freezers
                            • Continuous Deep Fat Fryers

                            What are your software requirements?

                            Finally, you need to make sure the In-Process Validation Loggers you are considering are compatible with software you are confident in introducing to your site. Here, you should prioritise ease-of-use, security, cost, and whether or not the software complies with the relevant standards. Another bonus is if the logger you are considering is compatible with more than one software option, as this will allow you to adapt the package to meet the specific needs of your site. Whether you require support with your HACCP monitoring or would like multiple users to have access to your account, a choice of software will only make it easier for you to find what you need.

                            What are the different options available?

                            Now that we’ve taken a look at the five key questions you need to ask yourself when evaluating what’s best for your site, let’s explore three popular examples of In-Process Validation Loggers. You can apply your list of priorities to the models below.

                            LEBI-11 Loggers

                            LEBI-12 Loggers

                            Multi-Channel Loggers

                            • Suited to smaller spaces
                            • Temperature range of -30°C to 150°C
                            • Available in different temperature ranges
                            • Pressure: 1mbar to 10.000 mbar
                            • Rapid calculation of both F0 and PU values
                            • IP68 Protection
                            • Solid and versatile
                            • Temperature range of -90°C to 150°C
                            • Available in different temperature ranges
                            • Pressure: 1mbar to 4.000 mbar
                            • Rapid calculation of both F0 and PU values
                            • IP68 Protection
                            • 6, 10, or 20 channels available
                            • Bespoke thermal barriers and thermocouples for all applications
                            • Data analysis available
                            • Software available for food safety analysis
                            • Manufactured, serviced, and calibrated in the UK

                            So that brings us to the end of our guide to selecting the right In-Process Validation Loggers for your food production site. Hopefully you have come away with a more in depth understanding of how the loggers work and how they could find their place in your operation.

                            If you require any further guidance relating to In-Process Validation Loggers, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation

                            If you would like further guidance relating to In-Process Validation Loggers, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                              ATP Monitoring

                              Is ATP Monitoring Effective in High Care Environments?

                              With an increasing number of sites expressing their frustration towards conventional ATP tests, we wanted to take a closer look at a new and improved methodology: the A3 system. To ensure the information provided is as relevant as possible, we decided to focus on Hygiene Monitoring in High Care Environments, as this is an area where ATP testing is especially limited.

                              This topic was the inspiration behind a recent Klipspringer webinar.

                              During this webinar, Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon was joined by our in-house A3 Specialist Radek Tameczka and Cleaning Verification Specialist Dr Stephan Speidel. The panel covered the four key areas listed below, and also answered a series of pertinent questions.

                              You can watch a full recording of the webinar below

                              Alternatively, you can scroll down to read our key takeaways, using the navigation buttons to skip straight to the section most relevant to your needs… 

                              Cleaning Verification in High Care Environments

                              Audit compliance is one of the key reasons for effective cleaning verification. With this in mind, Alex shared one of the most relevant clauses from Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard.As you can see, Clause 8.5.2 isn’t specific about the approach to hygiene monitoring that needs to be in place. Instead, it is left up to the site to determine the risk level and to establish a suitable strategy. 

                              Source: BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard Version 9​

                              When providing a brief definition of High Care Environments, Alex turned again to Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. ​According to the Standard, products that require handling within a High Care Environment should meet the following criteria:

                              Source: BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard Version 9​

                              The key takeaway from this definition is that the products in question have undergone a process before entry into the area, but are still vulnerable to the growth and survival of pathogens. The next section of this Webinar will help to explain why these factors can seriously undermine the accuracy of conventional ATP testing. In fact, it is High Care Environments that typically see the least reliable performance of ATP monitoring. 

                              Exploring A3 Hygiene Validation

                              ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a molecule found in all living cells. This is why so many sites turn to conventional ATP testing when they are trying to detect organic residue on a surface.

                              However, ATP is an unstable molecule that degrades to ADP and AMP during common processes such as cooking, fermentation, blanching, and cleaning. At this point, conventional ATP tests will often generate a pass result, detecting only low levels of ATP. This is a serious concern, as there will still be organic residue present in the form of ADP and AMP.

                              To address the limitations of conventional ATP testing, the A3 system introduces recycled enzymes to detect all three forms of the adenosine molecule: ATP + ADP + AMP. This is especially important for High Care Environments that often handle products where ATP levels have been greatly reduced through processes such as cooking.

                              Below are a series of graphs that compare readings generated by the A3 system to three of the most popular ATP testing methods. As you can see, the RLU values differ dramatically. Depending on the pass/fail limits of each site, it is likely that the ATP results would be considered pass results, with only the A3 system accurately detecting the real amount of organic residue.

                              Radek Tameczka, our in-house A3 expert, carried out a series of additional tests in preparation for this webinar:

                              Below you can see the results of these tests and the clear difference between the readings generated by the A3 system and conventional ATP testing:

                              Product

                              The A3 System

                              Conventional ATP Test

                              Cooked Ham

                              305,811 RLU

                              21 RLU

                              Peanuts (Allergen)

                              6,641 RLU

                              48 RLU

                              Soy Sauce (Allergen)

                              1,755 RLU

                              61 RLU

                              Considerations when implementing the A3 System

                              Typically, sites will focus on six key factors when considering the switch to the A3 system:

                              • Referential benchmarks​​
                              • Increased sensitivity
                              • Ease-of-use and training 

                              • Recording results
                              • Audit documentation
                              • Cost of implementation 

                              First, let’s address the subject of Referential Benchmarks. The benchmark RLU value depends on:

                              • The condition of the surface being tested
                              • The type of ingredients/materials coming into contact with the surface
                              • The risk management level of the area

                              For the most effective benchmark values, we recommend validating all testing points, as this is the best way to ensure any benchmarks relate to your site’s specific cleaning methods and acceptance criteria. This something our Technical Support Team can help you with. 

                              In the meantime, below is an example of Referential Benchmarks for Hygiene Monitoring practice:​​

                              Test Point

                              Pass Rate

                              Fail Rate

                              Stainless steel surface with direct food contact (HIGH risk)

                              100

                              200

                              Conveyor belt

                              250

                              500

                              Transportation container, temporary packaging and IBC (HIGH risk)

                              500

                              1000

                              Processing equipment

                              500

                              1000

                              As you work through this process, you can establish a plan for any areas where the heightened sensitivity of the A3 system is failing surfaces that previously passed ATP tests. Although the prospect of an initial round of failed tests can be intimidating, a more accurate system will help to eliminate confusion, time wastage, food safety risks, and false positives. ​

                              Next, let’s discuss ease-of-use and training. At least in terms of appearance and the way you take your samples, the A3 system is very similar to ATP tests. First, you use either a surface swab, premoistened swab, or water swab to take a sample, then you open the lid of the device, insert the swab, close the lid and wait around ten seconds for a reading.

                              This simplicity should make it easy for your operatives to understand the system without the need for extensive training. However, if you do require any training resources, this is another area where Klipspringer can offer support. We can also handle repairs and calibrations, with a quick turnaround and loan units that can be delivered to your site within 24 hours.​​

                              Now, let’s discuss what happens to the results of the A3 system.The system works with easy-to-use software that allows you to store, evaluate and share data between users. Any readings can be updated in real time for positive release. This will prove invaluable when it comes to audit documentation, as an auditor will be able to see evidence of all your testing, with overall inspection scores available as easy-to-read graphs. ​​

                              Finally, let’s address any concerns surrounding cost. Although it involves a more advanced technology, the A3 system actually sits around the price point of conventional ATP tests. Due to its heightened sensitivity, the system could also help your site to reduce the frequency of external testing or expensive in-house allergen-specific tests. The savings you could make in this area should be considered when assessing the cost to your site.

                              Real-world insights: McCain Foods

                              McCain Foods decided to undergo an A3 trial for two key reasons:

                              1. Its Scarborough site was undertaking a major allergen validation exercise. The company is increasingly moving towards a series of gluten-free products, so an effective approach to Hygiene Monitoring was deemed more important than ever.

                              2. An interim technical person working at the Scarborough site identified a series of confusing results from conventional ATP tests – they indicated that a blanched potato didn’t contain any ATP and passed surfaces that were failing visual checks.

                              Nigel Church, the site’s Hygiene Manager, identified four key outcomes of the A3 trial:

                              1. The A3 methodology explained confusing results. Instead of the system passing a blanched potato or a surface that was visibly unclean, it was able to detect the presence of ADP and AMP. This allowed McCain Foods to update its cleaning regime to support the elimination of all organic residue, not just ATP.

                              2. Another benefit included a reduced requirement for allergen swabbing, with this leading to an overall reduction in cost. Although neither the ATP nor the more sensitive A3 system tests directly for allergens, the accurate detection of organic residue has the potential to reduce a site’s need for allergen testing, as if there is no more organic residue on a surface, it follows that there is nothing left to contaminate an allergen-free product.

                              Over the six-to-eight-month trial period, McCain Foods discovered that if a surface passed an A3 test it would go on to pass a gluten swab and then an ELISA test. In fact, during this period, McCain Foods didn’t have a single allergen fail following an A3 swab pass. This gave the trial sites the confidence to reduce the amount of allergen swabbing and ELISA testing carried out. 

                              3. The introduction of the A3 system also meant McCain Foods no longer had to deal with False Positive readings. Prior to the A3 trial, the unreliable ATP system would often generate extremely high readings even if a surface had been thoroughly cleaned. The results of these failed tests wouldn’t just be slightly high, they would involve RLU value that couldn’t possibly be correct.In contrast, the A3 system offered increased reliability across a wide range of testing environments.

                              4. Finally, McCain Foods was impressed by how easy it is to use the A3 system. Most of the other units they explored had some sort of menu process that you had to go through just to get a reading. As you saw during the demonstration, the A3 system only requires you to lift the lid and push the swab in before it generates a reading in around ten seconds.

                              Q&A

                              What are the benefits for Low Risk Environments? 

                              Although this webinar has focused on High Care Environments due to a growing sense of frustration in this area of the industry, the A3 system would offer the same benefits to a Low Risk Environment.  

                              How does a site establish its pass/fail criteria? Also, due to the system being more sensitive, most of our tests will be a fail at first. This will result in re-cleans which will waste water, time, and money. Is the system worth this?

                              This is a really common question and is usually one of the first to come up when a site considers the A3 system.

                              During the roll out of the A3 system, and especially during the Validation Process, our in-house Technical Team will provide ongoing support. Our goal is to make it so that once you have identified the areas where organic residue has been going undetected by the ATP tests, you can adjust your process and be confident in a pass result moving forward.

                              The heightened sensitivity of the A3 system should actually save you water, time, effort, and money in the long run, as it allows you to get a clear picture of what’s happening at your site. Instead of guesswork and confusing results, you will know in ten seconds whether a surface is clean and ready to use.

                              Do you know any sites that have validated the A3 system against normal environmental swabbing and managed a reduction in their schedule because of it?

                              During the Validation Process, we ask sites to include as many tests as possible. This makes it easier to determine what role the A3 system can play at your site – identifying tests that it could reduce the need for, replace entirely, or offer support with.

                              If your site is required to carry out certain tests, the A3 system should not be used to replace them, as of course you need to work in accordance to your customer expectations or auditing body.

                              However, what we have seen time and time again, is that if a surface passes an A3 test, it is extremely likely to pass any following tests.

                              Does the A3 system tell you the different ratios of ATP, ADP, and AMP?

                              The A3 system doesn’t provide separate readings or ratios for the amount of ATP, ADP, and AMP present on a surface. This is because the unique, patented enzyme in the swabs actually converts ADP and AMP back to ATP before it generates a reading. The success of the technology is due to the fact that it is the only system to detect all three adenosine molecules at once. Risk levels are determined by the possibility of new bacteria growth and you need to detect all three adenosine molecules to find this out.

                              What is the expected calibration frequency and is it possible to get a loan unit of the A3 system while our site’s unit is being calibrated?

                              We recommend recalibration on an annual basis. We haven’t noticed any drifts in terms of readings, so we have confidence in this time scale. It is also the recommendation provided by the manufacturer.

                              We are able to complete the recalibration at the Klipspringer Laboratory, so the process should be extremely straight forward. This normally takes 2-3 working days. During this time, we will be able to supply you with a loan unit.

                              It is also worth noting that the A3 system features an electronic control that lets you know whether or not the instrument is working correctly. The recommendation of an annual calibration comes from ISO requirements. However, in countries that operate outside of these requirements, we have seen sites using A3 systems that haven’t been calibrated for over ten years, but are still working perfectly. This makes it extremely likely that your system will pass. If you are at all unsure, there is also the option of activating the ‘self-check’ function of your unit and using an LED control swab to verify the instrument on-site.

                              How would the A3 system work in an environment that uses microbiomes? 

                              The A3 system is not able to distinguish between different types of bacteria. However, it can tell you how much organic residue is present on a surface. Consequently, if you are dealing with a single strain of bacteria, you could always correlate the RLU reading generated by the A3 system to the Colony Forming Unit (CFU). However, if your microbiome is a mixture of bacteria, you will be able to say how much or how little is present, as opposed to finding out how well the microbiome is performing.

                              How does the system support validation?

                              Our in-house Technical Support Team will guide you through the Validation Process, helping you to establish Referential Benchmarks. At the end of the Validation Process, we produce a document that confirms the process has taken place and explains the pass/fail limits. Both the process and the document should make it easy for your auditor to understand the thought process behind your Validation and the decisions you have made following it.

                              If your site is switching from the ATP system to the A3 system, we typically include the results of the ATP on the Validation Document. This allows auditors to clearly understand why the A3 system is the more accurate and reliable choice, along with why the established benchmarks are in place. They will be able to see that with the benchmarks, the surface would easily pass an ATP test, but due to your site’s commitment to accurate and thorough validation, you have ensured your surfaces also pass the more sensitive A3 system.

                              Does the A3 system have AOAC approval?

                              Yes, the A3 system, along with the surface swabs, premoistened swabs, and water swabs have AOAC approval.

                              If there is a customer requirement to carry out environmental swabbing, could the A3 system qualify?

                              The A3 system tests for organic contamination, this includes degraded bacteria and food residue. In contrast, environmental swabbing detects living bacteria. Consequently, the correlation between the two forms of testing are fairly low.

                              However, food residue is a breeding ground for a new generation of bacteria. This means that the ability to accurately detect this residue can inform and support your environmental testing. If a surface passes an A3 test and is not contaminated with a high level of organic residue, it follows that it is likely to pass any environmental swab tests.

                              The two systems compliment each other because environmental swabbing usually takes time to generate results, whereas the A3 system produces a reading in around ten seconds. So, the A3 system could be used, as you wait for the results of your environmental swabbing, to predict the results of these tests.

                              Are there any resources available relating to the typical results generated by the A3 system?

                              There are a number of Blogs, Case Studies, and Webinars relating to the A3 system in the Klipspringer Content Hub. A lot of these resources take a closer look at the typical results generated by the A3 system, offering in depth comparisons of the system to different Hygiene Monitoring methodologies.

                              Our in-house Technical Support Team will also be on hand to help with your enquiries, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Or, you can contact Radek directly at radek.tameczka@klipspringer.com.

                              It is also worth noting that as our Technical Team works with you on establishing the Referential Benchmarks for your site, we will often draw on real-life data generated by the A3 system.

                              How long has the A3 system been in use?

                              The A3 system has been around since 2017. We expect to see an increased number of sites switching to this methodology, especially as auditing bodies and standards become more aware of the limitations of conventional ATP tests.

                              So that brings us to the end of our webinar on ATP Monitoring and the more effective A3 system.

                              If you have any further questions, you can reach out to Radek at radek.tameczka@klipspringer.com or contact the Klipspringer team on 01473 461800 and sales@klipspringer.com


                              Allergen Tests

                              Cutting Boards: Everything You Need to Know

                              This guide presents five key considerations when finding the right cutting boards for your food production site.

                              The right cutting boards could make all the difference to your food production site, helping you and your team to:

                              • Ensure consistency: if your cutting boards feature clear guidelines, this should help your site to achieve accurate and consistent results.
                              • Reduce rejects: consistent results will lead to the reduction of rejects due to incorrect sizing.
                              • Improve efficiency: correctly equipping your operatives could reduce processing and/or rework time. This could lead to an increase in output.
                              • Streamline quality control procedures: if your cutting boards feature clear guidelines, this will simplify the process of checking factors like size, diameter, length, and slice width.
                              • Make instructions visual: colour-coded and engraved cutting boards will help you to communicate with your staff, especially those who don’t have English as their first language.
                              • Reduce equipment ‘shrinkage’: engraving your cutting boards with serial numbers or department names could work as an excellent deterrent for missing and/or stolen boards.

                              In the interest of helping you to secure the benefits listed above, we have created a guide to finding the right boards for your site – highlighting five considerations that should inform your decision.

                              1. Size and Thickness

                              First, you need to consider the size and thickness of your cutting boards. As you can imagine, a thicker board tends to be more durable. However, it will also be slightly heavier, making it the ideal choice for applications that don’t require the cutting boards to be moved around too frequently. A thicker board is also ideal for products and ingredients that are tougher to cut – offering increased stability and strength. In contrast, a thinner board is suited to the slicing of lightweight ingredients.

                              In terms of size, it’s essential that your cutting boards are big enough to support your application. Otherwise, there is an increased risk of your products and ingredients falling off the board and being contaminated by the surface underneath.

                              If you are unsure about the size and thickness that is best suited to your site, this is something to discuss with your equipment provider.

                              Here at Klipspringer, we supply cutting boards in the following sizes:

                              • 305 x 229 x 12mm
                              • 457 x 305 x 12mm
                              • 457 x 305 x 20mm
                              • 610 x 440 x 12mm
                              • 610 x 440 x 20mm

                              As you can see, there are two thicknesses available: 12mm and 20mm

                              We also provide bespoke sizes for our customers. To learn more about the options available, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com.

                              2. Colour

                              Cutting Boards are one of the most common examples of equipment that benefits from colour-coding. In fact, colour-coded chopping boards can be found in most homes, so they will certainly have their place in a state-of-the-art food production facility.

                              An established colour-coding policy reduces the risk of contamination and human error. It will also help your site to overcome language barriers and move towards audit compliance.

                              Below is an example of arguably the most popular approach to colour-coding:

                              • Red: raw meat
                              • Yellow: poultry
                              • Blue: fish and shellfish
                              • Green: fruit and vegetables
                              • White: dairy products and baked goods

                              HAACP guidelines also recommend brown for cooked meats and purple for allergenic foods.

                              At Klipspringer, we stock boards in white, blue, red, yellow and green in every size.

                              3. Guides

                              Next, you need to consider the sizing guides or requirements that will be included on your board. Of course, there is nothing stopping you from opting for a plain design, but the introduction of guidelines will help to speed up your operation, drive consistency, and make life easier for your operatives.

                              Ranging from straight forward centimeter increments for product preparation to large squares for dicing requirements, your boards can be customised with a wide range of guides.

                              Depending on your supplier, you could even set up custom guides to ensure you meet the product specifications of your customer. Using the board to the left as an example, this could help your operatives to check factors such as the length of a bean, the width of a carrot, and the circumference of a tomato. As a result, your site should see a reduction in customer complaints and unnecessary product wastage.

                              4. Printed vs Engraved Boards

                              Another consideration is whether or not you want the guidelines on your cutting boards to be printed or engraved. Typically, sites favour engraved designs, as printed chopping boards tend to fade – broken down by animal fats and cleaning chemicals. As you can imagine, this could present a foreign body risk. It could also involve the costly replacement of your equipment every time the markings show signs of wear. In contrast, engraving provides clear, bold guides that will not degrade over time. Custom engraving will also help you to avoid the foreign sizing templates that are often found on standard printed chopping boards.

                              5. Certification

                              As with any of the equipment for your food production site, you need to ensure your cutting boards have the correct certification. Otherwise, your operation could be at risk of a serious non-conformity or even a failed audit.

                              Perhaps the most important requirement to check is whether or not your cutting boards have been manufactured from food contact approved materials.

                              It is also worth noting that the choice of material will impact more than just compliance, with substances such as HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) suited to food grade applications, but also more resistant to the scratches and indents that often accompany knife usage.

                              If you have any concerns, it’s best to speak to your equipment provider.

                              So that brings us to the end of our guide to finding the right cutting boards for your factory. As you work through your list of priorities and weigh up the different options available, the Klipspringer team would be happy to provide support. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                              If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                Sustainable

                                Five Solutions for a Sustainable Food Production Site

                                This guide presents five opportunities for you to nurture a culture of sustainability at your food or beverage production site.

                                With conversations surrounding the environment often turning to the impact of food production, there has never been a better time to pre-empt any challenges to your operation. The best way to do this is by adopting a proactive approach to evaluating and enhancing your site’s relationship with sustainability.

                                Here at Klipspringer, we have an ongoing commitment to our FutureFirst Initiative – a three pillar approach that reflects our understanding of environmental issues. In addition to the enhancement of our own operation, the FutureFirst Initiative also involves supporting the sustainability commitments of our customers – ensuring we have the products and services to help them secure success.

                                With this in mind, we have created a guide that runs through five solutions that could help your site to meet its sustainability targets – impressing auditors and customers, strengthening the reputation of your brand, and having a positive impact on the environment.

                                1. Equipment in a Circular Economy

                                In a circular economy, items are kept in use for as long as possible. Instead of being sent away to landfill as soon as an initial function has taken place, equipment will be repaired and reused multiple times. Although this is a sustainable choice that could significantly reduce your site’s impact on the world’s resources, it is also easy to implement, with no major changes to the processes at your factory.

                                With shoes taking an average of 30-40 years to decompose in landfill, protective footwear is a great place to start if you are looking to introduce equipment like this to your site.

                                Designed to improve hygiene, eliminate odour, and reduce cost, Klipspringer’s range of washable footwear is a prime example of equipment that can be repurposed after use. From judo mats and building insulation to the floors in your home, Protect Shoes can fulfil a number of purposes once they are no longer needed at your site.

                                It is also worth remembering that the suppliers of equipment in a circular economy will often take care of the recycling process for you, and this is true of Klipspringer, with our depot ready to recycle your used Protect shoes whenever they are returned.

                                One final consideration is the evidence of your environmental efforts. This is especially important if your site has sustainability targets, you are preparing for an upcoming audit, or you are working with a image-conscious customer. If your supplier has experience in helping sites to become more sustainable, this should be easy to arrange. For example, Klipspringer sends out a digital certificate once your Protect Shoes have been returned.

                                2. Equipment made from recycled materials

                                The next step is to consider equipment that has been made from recycled materials. This is another opportunity for you to minimise your site’s impact on the world’s resources – giving a new purpose to materials that would otherwise go to waste.

                                Often, recycled materials have been removed from an environment where they had the potential to damage the eco-system. For example, Klipspringer’s EVERSEA® Cleaning Equipment has been made using marine waste that would otherwise be harming animals such as whales, dolphins, and sea turtles.

                                Eversea Socket Mop

                                • Suited to any surface
                                • Unique blend of 25% SEAQUAL INITIATIVE plastic and 75% recycled plastic
                                • Compatible with Klipspringer’s complete range of threaded handles

                                Eversea Mop Bucket & Sieve

                                • 15 litre capacity
                                • Unique blend of 50% SEAQUAL INITIATIVE polypropylene and 50% recycled polypropylene
                                • Industry first
                                • Ergonomic handle

                                Eversea Flat Mop

                                • 40cm wide
                                • Unique blend of 20% SEAQUAL INITIATIVE yarn and 80% recycled plastic
                                • Compatible with Klipspringer’s recycled flat mop frame

                                Aluminum Handle

                                • Compatible with Klipspringer’s recycled Socket and Flat Mops

                                Eversea Dustpan & Brush

                                • 40cm x 47cm
                                • Unique blend of 50% SEAQUAL INITIATIVE polypropylene and 50% recycled polypropylene
                                • Bonded rubber strip for a close fit to the surface

                                Eversea Microfibre Cloth

                                • Microfibre design ‘picks up’ dirt and debris
                                • Unique blend of 30% SEAQUAL INITIATIVE yarn and 70% recycled cotton
                                • Provides a cleaner finish in less time

                                Environmentally Friendly Surface Disinfectant Wet Wipes

                                • Do not include chemicals that are harmful to the environment
                                • Dermatologically tested: suitable for hands and surfaces
                                • Kill viruses and bacteria
                                • Remove grease and grime
                                • Option to restock with a refill pack that allows you to keep the bucket – even more sustainable

                                3. Sustainable trade-in schemes

                                If you are working to a tight budget and you are concerned that your sustainability efforts will be at the expense of your site’s finances, it is important to note that many environmental initiatives are accompanied by financial incentives. For example, Klipspringer is currently running a Scales Trade-In Scheme that allows you to upgrade your scales and balances, all whilst saving money and taking a step closer to your sustainability targets.

                                KS1 Scales

                                £50 Trade-In Voucher

                                Gladiator Washdown Scales

                                £100 Trade-In Voucher

                                There are two models included in the trade-in scheme: the KS1 scales and the Gladiator Washdown scales. If you have either of these models at your site, this could be a great opportunity for you to hand over responsibility for the disposal of your old scales. Instead of a complicated process or an unsustainable outcome, we will take care of the process, operating in compliance with The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE Directive).

                                4. Switching from paper to digital systems

                                If your site relies heavily on paper checklists and records, you could also consider switching to a cloud-based quality management system. This will not only help you to become a more sustainable organisation – dramatically cutting your paper usage – but it also has the potential to save your site time and money, increase visibility, improve the accuracy of your data, and help your team to prepare for audits. If you find it difficult to push through sustainability measures at your site, a solution that offers a variety of benefits is often the best way to secure the support of different departments and senior management.

                                5. Reducing waste throughout your process

                                Finally, if your site is considering the introduction of new equipment, you should be on the look out for opportunities to reduce waste. Often, this will be in the form of instrumentation that provides more accurate results than the equipment it is replacing. For instance, highly accurate thermometers, pH meters, or pocket meters are all examples of equipment that will help operatives to monitor your product – reducing the risk of a compromised batch that has to be abandoned.

                                With cooking oil one of the biggest areas of waste for commercial kitchens, Food Oil Monitors could also prove beneficial to sites that are aiming to reduce waste. Many sites rely on guesswork, leaving it up to individual operatives to decide when the oil needs to be replaced, with this decision often based on subjective factors like colour.

                                The Food Oil Monitor takes the guesswork out of these quality checks. Instead, it extends the lifespan of the oil – allowing sites to cut oil use by up to 52%, without compromising on the quality of the finished product.

                                So that brings us to the end of our guide to moving your site in a more sustainable direction. As you evaluate – and potentially enhance – your equipment, processes, and approach to waste management, the Klipspringer team would be happy to provide support. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                                If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                  Protein Swabs

                                  Protein Swabs vs A3 Testing: Everything you need to know

                                  A quick and simple way to detect organic residue and a wide range of allergens, protein swabs are a popular choice across the food and beverage production industry. In fact, Food Safety Magazine carried out a survey towards the end of 2018 which revealed that 17% of sites rely on protein-specific tests for their allergen management.

                                  Despite their popularity, many sites have expressed frustration at the limitations of protein swabs. One of the key complaints is that protein-specific tests are qualitative – generating non-specific and non-numerical results. There is also the question of the reduced efficiency that occurs when they are tasked with detecting a substance that has low levels of residual protein contamination.

                                  With this in mind, we have put together an honest comparison of protein swabs and a newer methodology: the A3 system. This article explores the benefits and limitations of both approaches, helping you to decide on the best solution for your site and applications.

                                  If you currently use protein swabs at your site, but have limited to no experience with the A3 system, the following video will guide you through the essentials:

                                  For more information on the A3 system, you can also follow the link below to watch a webinar on Hygiene Monitoring in High Care Environments. Hosted by Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon, our in-house A3 specialist Radek Tameczka, and scientific advisor Dr. Stephan Speidel, this webinar explores the limitations of conventional hygiene monitoring methods and provides real-world examples of A3 verification at High Care production sites.

                                  The detection of raw fish or meat

                                  If your site handles the production of raw fish or meat, this is one area of the industry where it is especially important to understand the different detection sensitivities of protein swabs and the A3 system. Failing to do so could result in cross-contamination and could pose a serious risk to the safety of your product.

                                  Below are the results of comparative tests carried out by Wataru Saito and Mikio Bakke for the Kikkoman Biochemifa Company. These tests relate to the sanitation monitoring of stainless steel when exposed to raw fish and meat.

                                  The orange markers reflect the four points at which testing was carried out. The first test took place before the surface was washed, the second after it was rinsed with cold water for fifteen seconds, the third after a fifteen second rinse with water at 50°C, and the fourth after the surface was cleaned with detergent and a sponge.

                                  As you can see, the benchmark value of 200 RLU was put in place for the A3 system and it was only reached after the final test when the surface had been thoroughly washed with detergent.

                                  In contrast, the protein swab detected salmon and chicken residue before the first wash and detected a trace of chicken after the second – turning purple to reflect these findings. Aside from this, the protein swab incorrectly passed the stainless steel surface, failing to detect the raw fish and meat. 

                                  These findings suggest that if the denaturation of proteins occurs through processes such as thermal processing or exposure to chemical agents, the results of protein-specific tests will be compromised. The accuracy of the A3 system; however, is unimpacted by such changes.

                                  The detection of nuts

                                  Further research from the Kikkoman Biochemifa Company includes a comparison of the following methodologies for the detection of peanut residue:

                                  • Protein Swabs
                                  • The A3 System
                                  • Conventional ATP Tests
                                  • Lateral Flow Detection Methods (LFD)

                                  During this study, 10g portions of peanuts were mixed with 90ml of sterile distilled water and homogenised to generate 10-fold dilutions, before 10-fold serial dilutions were carried out.

                                  100 RLU was established as an action level, with the calculated concentration equivalent displayed in the figure below. The concentration of total protein was also evaluated by the ELISA and Bradford assays to produce the theoretical dilution factors that are plotted with the blue and red Xs.

                                  As you can see, the protein swab test could only detect samples up to a 10²-fold dilution, making it only slightly more effective than the conventional ATP tests.

                                  In contrast, the A3 test proved to be much more effective. In fact, the system was sensitive enough to detect the 10ppm (parts per million) levels of peanut protein calculated by the ELISA and Bradford assays – proving to be the most sensitive of the three methodologies.

                                  The detection of milk

                                  If your site handles milk or dairy products, it would also be worth evaluating the findings of a Case Study carried out at the Saitama Kikkoman Company Processing Plant.

                                  In this study, the effectiveness of an A3 system was compared to that of conventional ATP tests and protein swabs.

                                  Products using raw milk were selected and nine sampling points were tested:

                                  • A silicon spatula
                                  • Wire mesh at raw material inlet
                                  • The insertion slot for raw materials
                                  • Nearby surface to the insertion slot
                                  • Inner wall of mixing tank

                                  • Impeller of mixing tank
                                  • Hopper
                                  • Nozzle
                                  • Stainless steel saucer of filling machine

                                  These sampling points were tested at three stages: before cleaning, after a rinse with 75°C water, then after a wash with 90°C water and an alkaline cleaner, followed by a rinse with 75°C water.

                                  The ATP test could only detect samples up to a 10²-fold dilution, generating a reading of just 13 RLU. Similarly, the protein swab could only detect residue up to a 10²-fold dilution. In contrast, the A3 system was still providing a reading for the 10⁵-fold dilution, generating a RLU value of 86.

                                  An ELISA test for milk protein was run alongside these tests. It revealed the extent to which milk protein decreased throughout the cleaning process: 10-40 μg before the first wash and 0.1 μgo or less after the final wash. 

                                  • Square: before washing
                                  • Triangle: after first wash
                                  • Circle: after final wash

                                  The above chart illustrates a clear correlation between the results produced by the A3 system and the ELISA test for milk protein. This correlation only existed for the less sensitive protein swabs and ATP tests up to a 10²-fold dilution. In contrast, the A3 system supported the findings of the ELISA testing throughout the entire cleaning process – acting as the perfect example of how the A3 methodology could work in tandem with your site’s allergen control system.

                                  The detection of allergens

                                  Someone who suffers with a food allergy will experience an allergic reaction when their immune system recognises proteins in certain foods. This is why protein-specific tests are often linked to allergen management.

                                  The A3 system detects all three forms of the adenosine molecule: ATP, ADP, and AMP. It does not; however, detect allergenic proteins, which means allergens cannot be identified or assayed directly. In fact, it’s important to stress that the A3 system cannot replace allergen testing and should never be relied upon for this function.

                                  With this in mind, it would be easy to assume that protein swabs should play a much more central role in your site’s allergen control program than the A3 system.

                                  However, this is challenged when you factor in the heightened sensitivity of the A3 system and its unique ability to determine the level of organic residue on a surface. After all, if a surface is free from organic residue, it follows that there will be no allergen residue left to cross contaminate your product.

                                  Consequently, the A3 system can work in conjunction with your allergen testing, with the potential to reduce the frequency of your tests and the ability to provide a much more accurate picture than the less sensitive and often incorrect protein swabs.

                                  To support this point, Saito and Bakke also carried out a thorough comparison of the rapid hygiene tests used for the detection of allergenic foods. This process involved taking 40 products that are regulated as allergens across the USA, Canada, EU or Asia, then homogenising and serially diluting them with water.

                                  Using the data collected during this testing, we can determine which methodology had the superior detection limits for which product. There are three categories to consider: products where the A3 system displayed a heightened sensitivity, products where the sensitivity of the A3 system and protein swabs was comparable, and products where the protein swabs displayed a heightened sensitivity.

                                  A3

                                  A3 & Protein Swabs

                                  Protein Swabs

                                  Canned tuna, mackerel (raw), salmon (raw), shrimp, crab, yogurt, cream cheese, chicken (raw), pork (raw), beef (raw), abalone, squid, salmon roe, peanuts, soybean, bread, beer, almond, hazelnut, cashew, mustard, sesami, matsutake mushroom, coconut milk, celery, tomato, orange, kiwi fruit, banana, peach, apple, yam, walnut, and buckwheat

                                  Milk, ice cream, whole egg and wheat flour (boiled)

                                  Gelatin

                                  These tests revealed that the A3 system offered heightened sensitivity for 35 products, there weren’t any areas where conventional ATP test proved superior, there were four products where the A3 system and the protein swabs were equally effective, and there was one area where the protein swabs acted as the more effective methodology. The fact that protein swabs were more sensitive to gelatin is unsurprising, as gelatin is an extracted animal protein.


                                  On the subject of allergen control, it is also worth noting that we have launched a new range of Rapid Allergen Test Kits for: Egg (Ovalbumin), Casein, Gluten, Soya, Peanut, Crustacean, and Buckwheat.

                                  These Lateral Flow Tests offer the following benefits:

                                  • Minimum accuracy rate of 0.5ppm
                                  • Simple, two-step process (eliminates Extraction Buffer Solution)
                                  • Assay time of 10 minutes
                                  • Stored at 2-30°C (no need for fridge)
                                  • Lifespan of 12 months

                                  Key Points to Consider

                                  Building on the case studies and testing referenced throughout this article, below are the key points that you should consider when deciding if protein swabs or the A3 system are the best fit for your site.

                                  Protein Swabs

                                  • Detects protein and a wide range of allergens
                                  • Instrument free and convenient to use
                                  • More effective for the detection of the extracted animal protein: gelatin
                                  • Results in 10 minutes
                                  • Qualitative results
                                  • Reduced efficiency when dealing with low levels of protein contamination
                                  • Less effective than the A3 system for verifying the presence/amount of remaining food debris

                                  The A3 System

                                  • Detects organic residue and supports your allergen control program
                                  • Can be used to assess the effectiveness of cleaning on site
                                  • Results in 10 seconds
                                  • Processes like heating and cleaning result in the denaturing of protein and ATP, but results will still be in measurable parameters for AMP and ADP
                                  • Quantitative results
                                  • More effective than protein swabs for verifying the presence/amount of remaining food debris
                                  • Unable to directly detect allergenic proteins

                                  That brings us to the end of our honest comparison of protein swabs and the A3 system. We hope that it has helped to illustrate the fact that although the A3 system is unable to detect specific allergenic proteins, it is more effective than protein swabs when verifying the amount food debris left on a surface – able to function even after thermal processing and exposure to chemical agents. The system can also be used to measure sanitation efficiency at your site and support your allergen control program.

                                  If you would like further guidance in this area or would be interested in learning more about the A3 system mentioned in this article, you can contact us on 01473461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                                  If you would like to learn more about the A3 system, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                    Internal Audits: Securing Success for Your Food Production Site

                                    With BRCGS expecting a minimum of four Internal Audits per year, the importance of understanding this process cannot be overstated.

                                    At its core, an Internal Audit is about verifying the processes at your site – making sure your operation meets the relevant standards and is doing what it should to protect the consumer.

                                    Internal Audits are also inextricably linked to improvement. After all, they offer you and your operatives the chance to resolve non-conformities before they are identified by an external inspector, a retailer, or as a product safety issue.

                                    Training at your site will also heavily rely on the outcome of your Internal Audits, with the process helping your team to gain a more in depth understanding of their duties and to prepare for external inspections.

                                    With so many benefits to offer, Internal Audits need to be treated with the respect they deserve, so with that in mind, we have put together a guide to conducting a successful internal inspection, identifying four ways for you to make the most of this process.

                                    This article is directed towards sites that are audited against Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. For further guidance on the best approach to conducting a successful Internal Audit, see the BRCGS Webinar: Ask the Experts – Episode 4: Internal Audits

                                    Structuring your Internal Audits

                                    Those familiar with Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard will know there isn’t a set way to structure an Internal Audit. Instead, your approach should be decided by a series of risk assessments. Perhaps your site has recently launched a gluten-free line? Maybe your operation keeps being pulled up for the same non-conformity? Whatever the case, this is your chance to structure your audit in a way that targets these areas. As mentioned above, BRCGS expects a minimum of four audits a year, but there is nothing stopping you from carrying out additional audits in the areas where you identify an increased amount of risk.

                                    Although the Standard expects your Internal Audits to cover all of its requirements, there is no expectation that you audit everything in one go. With this in mind, you may decide to split up the process into more manageable chunks. For example, you could audit against your HACCP plan, Food Safety and Hygiene, then Allergen Management and so on until all aspects of your operation have been covered.

                                    Addressing the Culture at your site

                                    One of the best ways to secure a successful Internal Audit is to first consider the culture at your site. Far too often Internal Audits are viewed as extra work, a tick box exercise, or a negative experience that highlights the failings of each department.

                                    Instead, Internal Audits should be understood as a positive experience for everyone involved. They should exist as a learning exercise that grants the various departments at your site the opportunity to address any non-conformities before they are identified by an external inspector.

                                    You should also be pushing this mindset one step further, encouraging your operatives to view Internal Audits as a tool for continuous improvement. Rather than audits being something to pass or fail, they should be part of your site’s ongoing efforts to to raise standards and deliver on quality.

                                    To achieve this goal, we would recommend working through the following action points:

                                    Remember to include any internal auditing responsibilities in the job descriptions of your operatives and highlight this aspect of the role during interview. Internal Auditing shouldn’t be an extra task squeezed into a busy schedule, it should be regarded as a key responsibility.

                                    Another important step is to give both your Internal Auditors and your site staff plenty of notice when an Internal Audit is coming up. This strategy will obviously differ if your site is preparing for an unannounced audit, but if not, you should prioritise open communication and ensure everyone is available to participate.

                                    Finally, it’s important that you reward success, rather than highlight failure. Although it is highly likely that your Internal Audit will bring up areas of non-conformity, your operatives should be supported in this instance rather than punished. By carrying out a thorough root cause analysis, you can identify new equipment, instrumentation, or training that will not only resolve this non-conformity, but will also make life easier for the affected team.

                                    If your operatives know to expect positive action instead of negative consequences, they will be much more likely to engage with the process.

                                    Appointing your Internal Auditors

                                    It’s important to have the right number of Internal Auditors at your site, otherwise you will be at risk of falling behind schedule. You should also consider training up Deputy Internal Auditors who can step in if your Auditing Lead has an extended period of time off work.

                                    When appointing your Internal Auditors, you need to make sure the people you select have experience in the areas they are auditing. Although it would be beneficial, this experience doesn’t have to be extensive. Sometimes even a twenty minute sit down with a department lead can make all the difference. Qualifications are also worth considering. For example, if your auditor will be auditing HACCP Compliance, they will ideally have a HACCP qualification.

                                    The final point to consider is: will your training take place on-site or off-site? If you have a highly experienced auditor on-site, you may decide to carry out internal training, benefiting from trial audits and easy communication with your auditors. However, it’s important to remember that this training will be thoroughly audited to ensure it follows the rules of an auditing training course.

                                    Carrying our your Internal Audits

                                    Perhaps the most important point to stress is that your Internal Audits should never be a tick box exercise that you only carry out in the hopes of passing your official audit. The best way to safeguard against this is to make sure any auditing documents have plenty of space for feedback. This is incredibly important, as if an external auditor picks up on an Internal Audit that looks rushed, they are likely to reinvestigate. However, if your Internal Auditors include at least a couple of sentences for each point, this will demonstrate an understanding what is being assessed.

                                    Going into detail will also help the wider team to understand exactly how far off they are from a non-conformity. Say your team is compliant in all but one essential area, they will need to know which area this is in order to make the necessary changes. Alternatively, if your team is failing to secure compliance against a number of points, they will need to pay particular attention to this area of non-conformance.

                                    You should also consider making the switch to a Cloud-Based Quality Management System, as this will eliminate the inaccuracies and hassle of your team filling out endless piles of paperwork. A Cloud-Based System will also give you the option of easily sharing your reports. This will come in handy when taking corrective measures following an Internal Audit and will also be of use if part of your external audit is carried out remotely. A digital approach is also conducive to the storage of photographic evidence. This is something External Auditors love to see, so it’s important that your Internal Auditors are also taking lots of pictures as they tour your site.


                                    You now have four areas to consider when it comes to conducting a successful Internal Audit. Hopefully this article has helped you to identify the ways in which you are already succeeding, along with the ways in which you could further enhance your approach.

                                    Perhaps the main takeaway from this guide is that across all four areas mentioned above, preparation is key. Instead of rushing through and possibly resenting the process, Internal Audits should be one of the most useful tools at your disposal.

                                    If you require any further guidance in this area or would like to learn more about Cloud-Based Quality Management Systems, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation

                                    If you would like further guidance relating to your audit compliance and TRAKKD, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                      Repetitive Strain Injury: Protecting the Operatives at Your Site

                                      Repetitive Strain Injury is a danger faced by many of the operatives working within the food industry. In this article, we explore the role of ergonomic equipment in helping to safeguard against it.

                                      The 2019 Labour Force Survey revealed that in the UK alone, there are over 200,000 cases of work-related upper limb disorders every year, with these disorders directly related to Repetitive Strain Injury. The survey also called on findings from The Health and Safety Executive, estimating that 2.6 million working days were lost in 2017/18 due to such injuries, with an average of 14 days lost for each case.

                                      As an industry that relies heavily upon operatives who can carry out physical, demanding, and repetitive jobs, it’s important that we understand the dangers of Repetitive Strain Injury, along with the most effective ways to safeguard against it. Failing to do so could result in the following:

                                      • Your operatives will be at risk of serious and even lifechanging injuries
                                      • Your site will find it difficult to retain employees
                                      • Your site will have to cover the cost of employee absence and a loss of working days
                                      • Your site could be in breach of health and safety standards – at risk of a fine, corrective measures, or even closure

                                      With this in mind, we have addressed five areas where Repetitive Strain Injury could be a problem for your operatives, exploring ergonomic equipment solutions for each aspect of your operation.

                                      1. Shovelling and Scooping

                                      The shovelling and scooping of potentially heavy ingredients involves a repetitive action that has the potential to strain the arms, hands, back, shoulders, and even knees of your operatives. When it comes to shovels, one of the best ways to avoid this is to opt for an ergonomically designed handle that reduces the need for undue bending and encourages better posture than traditional shovel designs. The handles of the scoops at your site should also be ergonomic, ideally with built-in finger grooves that help with grip and ensure your operatives are holding their equipment at the right angle.

                                      2. Wheeling and Steering

                                      Next, you need to consider the process of ingredients and products being wheeled across your site. Here, ergonomically designed food handling containers will be essential. After all, your operatives will likely be moving heavy amounts on a regular basis.

                                      A good example of an ergonomically designed food handling container is a EuroBin with a raised handle. Working in tandem with the diamond wheel pattern at the base of the Eurobins, this feature allows for extra manoeuvrability and ease of steering. You should also look into dollies for your Interstacking Bins and Trays. Not only will this make your operation more efficient, allowing your operatives to move greater amounts in one go, it will also reduce the risks of RSI, with your operatives wheeling materials smoothly across the factory floor instead of being forced to lift and carry them.

                                      3. Lifting and Carrying

                                      You would be hard pressed to find a site that doesn’t rely on buckets across its hygiene and production teams. From the transport of ingredients to the cleaning of your factory floors, buckets are an essential piece of equipment. However, any item that requires frequent carrying also has the potential to increase the risk of Repetitive Strain Injury. This will all depend on the design of the bucket and whether or not it was made with repeated use in mind.

                                      Ideally, the buckets at your site will have ergonomic handles that make them comfortable to carry. Your operatives will also be grateful for a pouring spout, as this feature will make it easier to empty out the contents of the bucket without having to tip it as far.

                                      You should also look out for buckets with a ‘balanced’ design that stops it from banging against the legs or knees of your operatives when it is being carried. Although this is a separate concern to Repetitive Strain Injury, it is possible that your operatives will resort to carrying buckets at an awkward angle if the alternative is extreme discomfort.

                                      4. Cleaning, Scrubbing, and Scraping

                                      Even with the best equipment available, applications such as cleaning, scrubbing, and scraping will always require a certain amount of physical effort from your operatives. However, with access to high quality utensils, your team will find it easier to carry out their duties and will be less likely to injure themselves or feel the effects of repetitive strain.

                                      Once again, ergonomic handles are a must, making it easier for your operatives to grip the equipment correctly – encouraging the body’s natural positioning to diminish stress and eliminate discomfort.

                                      You should also endeavour to reduce the amount of physical effort your operatives have to exert. Say your team is regularly charged with cleaning stubborn substances off the factory floor. At some sites they would be expected to kneel down with a handheld scraper; however, there is also the option of using a metal scraper that has been designed with the cleaning of floors in mind – attached to a long handle that eliminates the need for bending. There are even floor scrapers that are shaped to support the easy cleaning of corners, saving your operatives the strain of twisting to an awkward angle.

                                      5. Sweeping, Mopping, Squeegeeing and High Reach Cleaning

                                      High reach equipment, flexible brushheads and telescopic handles will all come in handy when it comes to cleaning the walls and ceilings of your factory. Unlike standard equipment, they will help your operatives to clean hard-to-reach areas without straining themselves, especially across the shoulders, arms, and back. Another clever design option comes in the form of nylon reinforced polypropylene handles, which are also suited to the cleaning of your factory floors. Despite being able to withstand the daily demands of factory life, these handles are lightweight enough to reduce fatigue, as your operatives won’t have to carry as much weight.

                                      6. Writing

                                      Writing is one of the most common causes of Repetitive Strain Injury, so it’s vital that you encourage the operatives at your site to consider the positioning of their fingers when holding a pen. They should also be taking a moment to stretch out their hands if they ever experience stiffness or a sharp pain.

                                      Another important step is to ensure the pens at your site offer a firm writing experience – easy to use without your team having to press down at an awkward angle. You should also consider opting for pens with a textured surface that supports grip, with some pens even contoured for the thumb and finger.


                                      Ultimately, the best defence against Repetitive Strain Injury is preventative. Instead of waiting for your operatives to complain about sub-par equipment and the impact it is having on their health, you need to pre-empt any issues with ergonomic designs. Training and effective management will also play an important role, encouraging your operatives to use their utensils correctly and to adhere to your site’s health and safety measures at every turn. 

                                      As you move forward with this project, the Klipspringer team would be happy to provide support. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                                      If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                        EuroBins

                                        EuroBins: Everything You Need to Know About Customisation

                                        Are the food handling containers at your site suited to your application? In this article, we examine the customisation options available for stainless steel EuroBins.

                                        Also known as Tote Bins, EuroBins are used across the food production industry for the storage, transfer, and lifting of products. Thanks to their strength, durability, and hygienic design, standard EuroBins are a popular choice of equipment.

                                        However, with a growing number of sites displaying an interest in customisation, we wanted to take a closer look at the options for adapting your EuroBins – introducing features that reflect the specific needs of your operation and making life easier for the operatives working at your site.

                                        What are the Different Capacity Options?

                                        The first point to consider is the capacity of your Eurobins. You need to think about how much you need your tote bins to carry, the type of ingredients or products that need to be transported, and how much space you have on site to store your collection of bins. Here at Klipspringer, we provide EuroBins with the following capacity options:

                                        • 120ltr
                                        • 200ltr
                                        • 300ltr
                                        • 400ltr
                                        • 450ltr

                                        It is also worth noting that although the list above covers the standard sizes of EuroBins, we are not limited to this selection.

                                        If your site has a specific requirement, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com to learn more about the other options available.

                                        What are the Different Wheel Colours?

                                        EuroBin wheels are available in a selection of colours, with examples including white, blue, and green. This could help your operatives to distinguish between EuroBins with different purposes, even assigning them to specific zones of your site.

                                        Tuffx Identification Tags could also be used for this purpose, as they are available in eight different colours. Designed with the harsh environment of a factory mind, they can be attached to your EuroBins as an additional means of identification.

                                        Customisation Option One: Perforation

                                        Perforated containers could prove invaluable when it comes to protecting the freshness of the products and ingredients at your site. Instead of moisture and heat being trapped inside the EuroBins, the perforated sides allow for the uninterrupted circulation of air.

                                        This is incredibly important when it comes to the transport or storage of freshly baked items such as bread, cakes, and biscuits. EuroBins with perforated sides could also be of use for sites that handle fresh fruit and vegetables with the potential to wilt or spoil.

                                        Offering a further level of personalisation, different sized perforations are available. This means that you can select the option that is best suited to your site and applications. To learn more about the size range, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com

                                        Customisation Option Two: Wastage Bins

                                        Designed for use alongside common factory equipment such as check weighing systems and metal detectors, Wastage EuroBins, also known as Reject EuroBins, will help your operatives to collect, store, and control the waste at your site. Whilst an open tote bin or container could result in damaged or contaminated products being reintroduced to the production line, a closed bin with such a narrow entry point eliminates any room for confusion. Wastage bins can even be locked for added security. Then, as soon as the rejects need to be disposed of or the EuroBin needs to be cleaned, the lid can be removed with ease.

                                        Customisation Option Three: Chuted Bills

                                        If the operatives at your site spend a lot of time moving ingredients in and out of containers, you could save them a significant amount of time and effort with the introduction of EuroBins that have chuted bills.

                                        Designed for the specific purpose of pouring liquids, this customised tote bin will reduce the risk of a costly and potentially dangerous spill. Another benefit of this EuroBin design is that it is compatible with the most common tote bin lifts, so instead of your operatives struggling to tip, empty, and clean the EuroBins, this process can be automised.

                                        Customisation Option Four: Mesh Inserts

                                        Another option to explore is EuroBins with a mesh insert. This design feature is the ideal choice if your site handles products or ingredients that need to be drained, as any liquid or moisture will simply run through the mesh, leaving just the product or ingredient to sit in the basket.

                                        Another benefit of this style of EuroBin is that it is easy to keep clean, as the mesh insert can be removed by your hygiene team, rid of any debris, then returned ahead of production. Both the outer EuroBin and the inner mesh basket have durable stainless steel handles that will make this process easier.

                                        Customisation Option Five: Electropolishing

                                        Stainless steel surfaces that have been electropolished possess an electrical charge that prevents bacterial growth. Consequently, electropolished EuroBins are even more hygienic than the standard stainless steel design. If your EuroBins are likely to be exposed to corrosive chemicals, this is another reason to consider this customisation option, as the electropolishing process improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel equipment. Finally, thanks to it’s ultra-smooth surface, and reduced roughness, an electropolished EuroBin will be even easier for your Hygiene Team to keep clean.

                                        Customisation Option Six: Raised Handles

                                        Ergonomically designed equipment is an essential for any site that hopes to secure long term savings, maintain an efficient operation, and safeguard its operatives. With this in mind, you have the option of customising the EuroBins at your factory to include raised handles. Working in tandem with the diamond wheel pattern at the base of the Eurobins, the raised handle allows for extra manoeuvrability and ease of steering. Ergonomic designs work to support the natural posture of the body, with the raised handle preventing your operatives from stooping or pushing the EuroBin at an awkward angle.

                                        Customisation Option Seven: Drainage Valves

                                        If any of the applications carried out at your site involve liquids or ingredients and products with a high moisture content, selecting a EuroBin design that features a drainage valve at the base could significantly speed up the process of these materials being transferred or emptied out by your operatives.

                                        Drainage valves could also make life easier for your Hygiene Team, as during a deep clean, they will be able to hose down the EuroBins and force any water or chemical cleaning agents out of the valve instead of leaning into the EuroBin to remove them.

                                        Customisation Option Eight: Lid Trollies

                                        Made from grade 304 stainless steel and featuring a welded stainless steel handle, EuroBin lids are a popular accompaniment to our 200ltr EuroBins. Helping sites to further protect their products and ingredients, these lids are pyramid shape to ensure any liquids and debris flow away from the contents of the bins without risking contamination. Because of this pyramid shape, the size of the lids, and the importance of hygienic storage, you need to consider where you are going to keep your lids when they are not in use. Many sites turn to lid trollies for this purpose, safely storing multiple lids in one easily accessible location.


                                        You now have a list of the different customisation options available for Eurobins, along with the information you need to ensure your finished EuroBins are put to good use at your site.

                                        If you require any further guidance, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation

                                        If you would like further guidance relating to EuroBins, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                          milk and dairy

                                          Milk and Dairy Products: What is the best approach to Hygiene Monitoring?

                                          This article explores the importance of effective Hygiene Monitoring at sites that produce milk and dairy products. It also provides an in depth comparison of conventional ATP testing against the A3 system - an improved ATP methodology.

                                          An effective and accurate approach to hygiene monitoring is essential in every area of the food production industry. It is no surprise then that concerns surrounding conventional methodologies have become a major talking point, with a growing number of sites questioning the unreliable and confusing results generated by their ATP testing.

                                          Although this is an industry-wide problem, sites that handle milk and dairy products are particularly affected, with ATP levels dramatically impacted by their processes. In the interest of securing more accurate results, many factories within this sector are making the switch to a more sensitive and reliable approach: the A3 system.

                                          To help you decide on the next steps for your own site, we have created a guide that answers the key questions surrounding Hygiene Monitoring in relation to the production of milk and dairy products. In this article we will cover the areas listed below. There is helpful content in each section, but you can also use the links to skip to the subject most relevant to your site.

                                          You can also follow the link below to watch a webinar on Hygiene Monitoring in High Care Environments. Hosted by Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon, our in-house A3 specialist Radek Tameczka, and scientific advisor Dr. Stephan Speidel, this webinar explores the limitations of conventional hygiene monitoring methods and provides real-world examples of A3 verification at High Care production sites.

                                          A comparison of the two most popular methods of Hygiene Monitoring

                                          Conventional ATP tests

                                          ATP tests are commonly used to detect organic residue on a surface or piece of equipment, with this organic residue acting as an ideal breeding ground for bacteria. The logic behind these tests is that ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a molecule found in all living cells. Consequently, if a surface fails an ATP test, this indicates the presence of organic residue. However, it is a common misconception that if a surface passes an A3 test it is free from organic residue and is no longer a food safety risk.

                                          Instead, the limitations of a conventional ATP test render it insufficient as soon as processes like cleaning, heating, and fermentation have taken place. This is because ATP is an unstable molecule that degrades during these processes to become AMP and ADP. As the name suggests, AMP and ADP aren’t the target molecules for ATP-only assessments, so a conventional test will be unable to detect them. Instead, a system capable of detecting all three adenosine molecules is required. This is why the Kikkoman Biochemifa Company launched the A3 system in 2017.

                                          The A3 System

                                          Although it is an advancement on conventional ATP tests, the A3 system is just as easy to use. The first step is to swab the relevant test point with your choice of Surface Swabs, Water Swabs, or Pre-moistened Surface Swabs.

                                          The swab should then be placed inside the system’s lightweight, app based, handheld, auto calibrated device – with this device generating your reading in around ten seconds.

                                          This will be a familiar process to anyone who has used a conventional ATP test before; however, the key difference is that the A3 swabs introduce recycling enzymes that allow for conversion between all three adenosine molecules. This makes it possible for the A3 system to generate a reading that reflects the total organic residue covering a surface, as opposed to just the levels of ATP.

                                          How different are the results produced by conventional ATP tests and A3 technology?

                                          Now that we have established the key differences between conventional ATP tests and the more sensitive A3 system, it’s important to explore the extent to which results can differ between the two methodologies. The Kikkoman Biochemifa Company carried out extensive testing to determine this – using the A3 system and conventional ATP tests to detect a wide range of organic residue.

                                          Figure One provides a direct comparison of the A3 system and the traditional ATP approach when testing six popular dairy products. As you can see, in all six instances, the readings generated by the A3 system were more than double the readings generated by the ATP tests. This suggests that depending on the pass/fail limits of a site, there is every chance that the ATP tests would be passing surfaces in say an ice-cream factory or a cheddar cheese production site, with only the A3 system capable of detecting the organic residue that still needs to be removed.

                                          Figure Two presents this information in a table that also includes the ratio of A3 to ATP for each of the tests. There are significant differences for each product, but there are also stand-out items such as yogurt and Camembert cheese. This further illustrates the argument that the ability to detect all three adenosine molecules is valuable in any regard, but an enhanced system becomes absolutely crucial when a product has undergone processes like fermentation.

                                          Figure Three supports these findings, with the Kikkoman Biochemifa Company offering a direct comparison of the LuciPac A3 system and two key competitors: the Hygiena and the 3M. Again, the difference in readings is instantly apparent. It is also clear that the processes a product has undergone can intensify these differences. For example, when looking at the results for portion milk, which has not been fermented, the A3 reading is 1,000 RLU, the 3M is just over 100 RLU, and the Hygiena is just over 10 RLU. Even these discrepancies are extreme, but when you look at the results for fermented cheese, this goes one step further. The A3 system detects a reading of nearly 10,000 RLU, the 3M generates a reading of just over 10 RLU, and the Hygiena doesn’t register.

                                          Figure Four is another helpful resource, especially for production sites that either produce or handle chocolate. Here, the testing introduces an additional dairy product to the discussion, with the A3 system producing a reading of just under 5,000 RLU for a surface that has been exposed to chocolate. In contrast, the ATP tests generated a reading that sits well below 500 RLU. Once again, these results suggest ATP tests could be passing surfaces that are in need of further cleaning.

                                          Finally, Figure Five (right) presents the results of a sensitivity study of rapid hygiene monitoring for the detection of allergenic foods. For this round of testing, food products that are considered allergens across the USA, Canada, EU, or Asia were homogenised and serially diluted with water. The samples were then applied to A3 test swabs (plotted in red), ATP test swabs (plotted in black) and protein test swabs (plotted in purple).

                                          When compared to ATP tests, the A3 system displayed a heightened sensitivity in all areas, and when compared to the protein swabs, its detection limits were superior in most cases. In fact, the results of the protein swabs were only comparable for: milk, ice cream, whole egg, and wheat. As an extracted animal protein, gelatin was the only area where a protein swab test proved superior.

                                          Why is A3 technology especially suited to sites that handle milk and dairy products?

                                          A3 technology and allergen testing

                                          With milk included in the top 14 food allergens, your site’s ability to accurately detect the presence of organic residue is absolutely crucial. Although the A3 system does not test for specific allergens and should not be relied upon for this, it provides a far more sensitive method for the detection of organic residue than conventional ATP tests. This enhanced approach to Hygiene Monitoring has the potential to reduce your allergen swabbing requirements. After all, if a surface is free from organic residue, it follows that there isn’t any residue left to contaminate. This is something the Klipspringer team can help you to validate.

                                          On the subject of allergen control, it is also worth noting that we have launched a new range of Rapid Allergen Test Kits for: Egg (Ovalbumin), Casein, Gluten, Soya, Peanut, Crustacean, and Buckwheat.

                                          These Lateral Flow Tests offer the following benefits:

                                          • Minimum accuracy rate of 0.5ppm
                                          • Simple, two-step process (eliminates Extraction Buffer Solution)
                                          • Assay time of 10 minutes
                                          • Stored at 2-30°C (no need for fridge)
                                          • Lifespan of 12 months

                                          A3 technology and fermentation

                                          Fermentation is understood as the metabolic process that converts organic molecules, such as glucose, into acids, gases, or alcohol. This process yields just two ATP per glucose molecule. To give an idea of how low this is, aerobic respiration typically yields as many as 32 molecules of ATP per glucose molecule. This helps to explain why conventional ATP tests fail to detect the organic residue of products that have undergone fermentation, with ATP levels dropping dramatically throughout the process.

                                          The impact of fermentation on ATP is especially important when it comes to milk and dairy production sites, as many milk products rely on fermentation, most commonly with two specific types of bacteria: Lactobacilli and BifidobacteriaExamples include: cheese with a hard or semi-hard exterior, kefir, buttermilk, Greek yogurt, and most commercial yogurts.

                                          It is also worth noting that products such as Kefir and yogurt both consist of milk fermented with beneficial bacteria. This makes it all the more important that any unwanted organic residue is detected. Otherwise, as a breeding ground for bacteria, this organic residue could impact the properties of your dairy products, with the potential to disrupt the taste, appearance, and even the safety of your output.

                                          A3 technology and handwashing

                                          With a growing number of sites favouring clean, bare hands over food contact approved gloves, handwashing checks are becoming increasingly important across the food production industry. This is another area where A3 technology could benefit your milk and dairy production site.

                                          Firstly, the system could help you to identify operatives who are not yet ready to start work, with their hands in need of further cleaning. Instead of making the journey to an in-house laboratory or even waiting on external testing, you can find out this information on-the-spot. This will allow you to take the relevant steps before your product is exposed to potentially harmful bacteria.

                                          As well as empowering milk and dairy sites to share immediate improvement guidance with their operatives, the A3 system can also help factories to establish the most effective approach to handwashing. With results available in ten seconds and automatically turned into graphs via the Lumitester App, you will be able to identify the method, length of time, and cleaning solution that is best suited to the removal of organic residue.

                                          How do I roll out the A3 system?

                                          Working closely with a team of micro-biologists, Klipspringer provides ongoing support for the implementation and use of A3 technology. Throughout the process, we can help you to:

                                          • Establish personalised benchmarks
                                          • Select the right swabs for your site
                                          • Identify the relevant testing points
                                          • Train and engage your operatives
                                          • Set up and use the Lumitester App

                                          • Establish a handwashing procedure
                                          • Create Validation Documents to share with your auditors during an inspection
                                          • Find out if it is possible for your site to safely reduce its use of allergen swabs

                                          The Lumitester App will be another valuable resource, as it can be used to store the data gathered through your A3 testing. Promoting accuracy and accountability, the app automatically turns inspection pass rates into graphs and records every test alongside the date it took place and the operative responsible. Once you have this data, there is the option of downloading it onto Microsoft Excel. Alternatively, if you would like to access it at any time from anywhere in the world, you also have the option of storing it in the cloud.

                                           

                                          • Upload results to the cloud via Bluetooth and PC connection
                                          • Set test points and benchmark values
                                          • Display time-series data for each test
                                          • Track overall inspection scores, with graphs
                                          • Access results 24/7 – from any device, anywhere.

                                          So that brings us to the end of our guide to Hygiene Monitoring for sites that deal with the production of milk and dairy products. We hope this article has highlighted the importance of accurate hygiene monitoring within this sector and has outlined the risks associated with conventional ATP tests.

                                          If you would like any further guidance in this area, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. Our in-house A3 expert Radek Tameczka will also be available to provide support and relevant resources. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation

                                          If you would like further guidance relating to Hygiene Monitoring in relation to milk and dairy products, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below.