Food Safety Outcomes

The Power of Positive Energy: Driving Predictable Food Safety Outcomes

Following the success of the Food Safety Innovation Conference 2023, Denis Treacy, a key speaker at the event, recently joined Klipspringer Director, Alex CarlyonSales Director at FoodClean, Lars Turner, and Technical Quality Manager and Sustainability Lead at Nestlé Nespresso S.A, Reineke van Riemsdijk for an engaging webinar on Predictable Food Safety Outcomes. The Webinar explored the way in which positive energy can be harnessed to secure predictable food safety outcomes, paying particular attention to Denis’s Four Energies methodology and the principle of GOYA.

You can scroll down to read our key takeaways from this webinar. Alternatively, you can navigate the menu below to skip straight to the section most relevant to your needs… 

Is there such a thing a Zero Defect Food Safety?

Is there such a thing as Zero Defect Food Safety?

Zero Defect Food Safety requires the elimination of all risk and the guarantee that your product is safe. Arguably, this was the original purpose of HACCP when it was first introduced in the sixties.

The key principles of HACCP require you to:

  • Consider all Food Safety risks relating to your product
  • Map those risks and determine the control measures
  • Monitor those control measures and deploy any mitigations

Too often, sites will overlook the importance of the monitoring process, with this principle asking you to identify exactly what you are looking for, along with the best way to find out if your processes are working.

The Four Energies of Repeatable and Predictable Outcomes 

If you are going to secure repeatable and predictable food safety outcomes, you need to achieve a balance of four key energies: Strategy, Performance, Organisation, and Culture.

  • Strategy relates to the choices surrounding the policies, rules, operating standards, partners, resources, and risk profile of your business.
  • Performance relates to how a business manages its information, what it chooses to target, and how it responds to feedback.
  • Organisation relates to how you structure resources, determine competency, allocate responsibility, and support credibility.
  • Culture relates to leadership and behaviours, internal relationships, business and personal values, and positive motivation.

The Power of Positive Objectives

A fear of failure will never change a culture or deliver predictable and repeatable outcomes. The most it can do is secure the short-term attention of your operatives – motivating them to make changes in the moment, only to revert back to their previous approach as soon as they forget, stop being observed, or fail to see the importance of their actions.  

If you set targets for failure at your site, you will drive focus towards the reduction of the appearance of failure. As a consequence, the culture at your site will be one of judgement, impatience, frustration, anxiety, and even hostility. 

Alternatively, if you set targets for success, you will drive focus towards positive energy and will improve the likelihood of success. As a consequence, the culture at your site will be one of curiosity, innovation, understanding, and flexibility.  

You will be contributing to a fear of failure at your site if you sets objectives against lag measures. Such measures include cleaning fails, audit non-compliances, and foreign body complaints. Instead, positive objectives should be set in response to preventative measures such as incident near miss reports, shift performance management, and hazard observations.  

The GOYA Principle

The GOYA Principle is the process of encouraging everyone at your site to:

  • Be accountable, get involved, have a view, step forward, take ownership, and intervene
  • Ask questions, challenge, observe, inspect, calibrate, and compare
  • Have an impact and set actions in motion
  • Look for solutions everywhere and at all times, and embrace belief
  • Seek and reward success, and find fascination in failure

The Bradley Curve illustrates the relationship between safety issues and corporate culture. It also provides a way for you to evaluate the culture at your site, helping you to decide if it is reactive, dependent, independent, or interdependent. The GOYA Principle seeks to exploit the final option: interdependent culture.

Positive Decision Making

However effective we believe our preventative measures to be, it is vital that we are prepared for any issues should they occur. After all, it is how we react to these issues that defines our internal culture. 

It is impossible to overstate the importance of risk assessment, as it allows you to predict vulnerabilities, map the risks to your site, and identify controls. 

This process should be ongoing. Instead of waiting for a risk to express itself in your product, you need to take action as soon as you realise something is amiss. Drawing on the GOYA Principle, you should take responsibility for any risks – intervening immediately.  

You will also need to remember the following equation: 

Risk = Impact x Likelihood 

It follows then that you can mitigate risk by reducing both of these factors. A Map Grid will help you to do this, offering a prime opportunity for you to plan for continuity and prepare for crisis. It is worth noting that if you don’t use a Map Grid to monitor and mitigate risk, you will likely have to return to it when determining your response to failure.  

Q&A

When it comes to setting positive targets, what role does sampling and testing play? For example, would the swabbing of equipment following a clean factor into positive target setting?

Put simply, sampling and testing should confirm what is already known and understood. It should also provide documented proof that a system or process is working. If you view sampling and testing as a ‘discovery process’, this suggests the system or process has not been fully or adequately risk assessed – left vulnerable, unpredictable, and liable to surprise.

How do I implement GOYA at my site and how do I ensure it becomes part of a routine practice?

This will work much the same as an Operational Excellence Program. First, you need to identify areas for attention, such as GMP or Good Manufacturing Practices. You will then need to establish a ‘desired state’ to work towards, before deciding on the steps that need to be taken to achieve this goal. The GOYA Principle comes into play when you engage everyone at your site – dividing the steps into manageable parts with specific areas of focus. These areas could relate to factory zones, departments, or groups of people. This strategy will then be deployed in a similar manner to a Strategic Objective Cascade – making sure to implement a routine monitoring process.

If we take the example of a GMP improvement condition, the ‘desired state’ would include elements such as shadow boards, marcation areas, dedicated storage, and photos of the ‘desired state’. The zone in question will also be inspected on a regular basis, with the inspection comparing how the area should look to how the area does look. Instead of simply identifying ‘non-compliances’, you will need to ask: why? This question should be asked of every difference to the ‘desired state’. You will then need to investigate and identify sustainable changes that will rectify these differences.

How can a ‘Crisis Management Process’ be included in a system of Positive Decision Making? Surely, by its very description, ‘Crisis Management’ denotes failure?

If we consider Crisis Management to be a rare and unique event that only happens when disaster is imminent, then it never will form part of a Positive Improvement Process.

However, if we imagine a pyramid, with Crisis and Disaster at the very top, our positive focus will be drawn to the base where many tiny routine occurrences, such as a product that is out of specification, indicate opportunities for improvement.

Crisis Management should be viewed as an anomaly process that has routine at the base and escalates gradually. Each event should be understood, with its nature positively investigated and a sustainable change implemented.

The escalation would look like this:

Out of Spec Product – Adjust process

Out of Spec Product – Re-process product

Out of Spec Product – Send to waste

Out of Spec Product – Product presents a risk

The situation is only a crisis if this escalation happens outside the control of the plant – i.e. if the product is already in the supply chain.

Surely most academics, audit bodies, and educational institutes recognise a Positive Food Safety Culture as the single most important area of focus when it comes to improving food safety?

Chasing the mirage of a Food Safety Culture without some fundamental basics in place could actually increase vulnerability, unpredictability and the likelihood of failures. Instead, you need to ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is there a robust and reliable Planned Preventive Maintenance (PPM) process in place at my site?
  • Does the Operations team manage the Critical Control Points?
  • Does product, process, pest or hygiene monitoring ever deliver ‘surprises’?
  • Is production subject to ‘Positive Release’, with products checked and tested before being released into the supply chain?
  • Does the procurement team have authority to change material sources, specifications, or delivery formats without reference to the HACCP team?
  • Does my site have a less than favourable Health and Safety performance?

If you answer ‘yes’ to any of these questions, Food Safety Culture becomes an irrelevant ideal.

Why is setting targets for the reduction of Foreign Bodies described as a ‘failure measure’ and not one that promotes improvements in food safety?

Here, the positive objective would be to deliver measurable foreign body prevention objectives, such as an ever increasing Engineering PPM compliance, the positive control of segregation, researched and optimised cleaning schedules, or training and competency development. In contrast, foreign bodies or any non-spec inclusions, be they physical, chemical or biological, are a fail.

What is the best approach to adopt if you are struggling to push through ideas at your site?

If you feel like you are saying the right thing, but it’s not being heard, I would recommend sitting down with someone from your Finance Team. You need to find out how much of a positive financial impact your idea could have on the wider business. This should help you to get through to people who are primarily focused on costs, savings, financial targets, factory downtime ect… Say you go to your Operations Team with a £10,000 opportunity, they are much more likely to engage with your idea than if you turned up with a partially-developed plan.

The Food Safety Innovation Conference 2024

In this webinar, Denis highlighted the importance of attending industry events. He shared:

“I believe that when you are working in any industry where you are managing risk, it’s your obligation to seek and find knowledge, and network with other food service providers. I’ve been to many conferences, and there is no better place for you to do this than at The Food Safety Innovation Conference. The event is something different. It’s an environment where you not only sit and listen to people, but you also interact – breaking up into small groups to talk about what’s actually going on in our factories, finding out if anyone has faced the same situation and if we can learn from that.”

A collaborative effort from Klipspringer and FoodClean, the conference will be returning to the University of Lincoln on Thursday 13th June 2024.

If you would like to reserve your place at next year’s event and access an early-bird discount, simply click the button below.

So that brings us to the end of the second Food Safety Innovation Conference Webinar.

If you have any further questions, you can reach out to Alex at alex.carlyon@klipspringer.com or contact the Klipspringer team on 01473 461800 and sales@klipspringer.com.

You can also connect with Denis at denis@culturecompassltd.com and learn more about Culture Compass at culturecompassltd.co.uk. 


shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Shadow Boards: The Five Most Frequent Problems with Magnetic Mounting

In this article, we will be taking a closer look at the problems or concerns associated with shadow boards with magnetic mounting.

We will be covering the following points, helping you to decide if they are are accurate or the product of misinformation. There is something to be said for each topic, but you can also use the links below to skip to the issue that is most relevant to your site.

Problem One: the upfront cost of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Problem Two: the gap behind shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Problem Three: the strength of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Problem Four: the mobility of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Problem Five: the suitability of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

We want to be upfront and say that, since popularising them in 2011, Klipspringer has been the leading supplier of shadow boards across the food industry. We do stock shadow boards with a magnetic mounting, but also supply Stand-off Wall Mounted, Freestanding Static, Fixed-to-Wall, and Freestanding Mobile boards, so have no vested interest in swaying your decision. Instead, we want you to find the right fit for your site processes, along with your audit standard stipulations.

Problem One: the upfront cost of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

In addition to the ‘Buy it now’ Cleaning Stations that are sold at a fixed price, you can commission bespoke shadow boards to reflect the specific requirements of your site. As you would expect from a bespoke product, prices will vary, but it is possible to provide an estimation:

Wall Mounted or Magnetic Shadow Boards

Small: £100-250

Large: £200 – £450

Mobile or Free Standing Shadow Boards

£600 – £850

You can also use our Shadow Board Configurator to generate a more accurate prediction of the cost of your shadow boards, using AI technology to produce your ideal design.

As you will see from the estimations above and your time on the Configurator, shadow boards with magnetic mounting don’t tend to be as expensive as the mobile or free standing versions. However, they are typically more expensive than the wall mounted alternatives.

This upfront cost could be a deal-breaker for some sites, especially if they are understandably concerned about their budget and focused on lowering their expenses wherever possible.

However, when it comes to the purchase of new equipment, it is also worth evaluating the opportunity to secure long term savings. In the case of shadow boards with magnetic mounting, you could save your hygiene team a significant amount of time and effort – eliminating the hassle of cleaning behind fiddly fastenings and allowing your operatives to remove and replace the boards with every clean. This could lead to the reduction of the Hygiene Window and the lengthening of active production time.

Another saving could be achieved with the initial installation of the shadow boards, as instead of waiting for your maintenance team to fix them in place, you can put the boards to use immediately. This will not only speed up your operation, but will also come in handy if your shadow boards were ordered in an attempt to address a potential non-conformity relating to the storage of your equipment. Rather than risk an unannounced audit or even an announced audit that comes around too quickly, you can install your shadow boards straight away. This could save you the eventual cost of resolving a non-conformity or dealing with the fall out of a failed audit.

Problem Two: the gap behind shadow boards with magnetic mounting

When sites are first introduced to the concept of a storage solution that can be lifted on and off a factory wall, they will often worry about the gap behind the shadow board – identifying it as a potential harbourage point for bacteria, condensation, and mould.

Although it is important to avoid harbourage points at all costs, being able to remove then reposition your shadow boards, could actually make life easier for your hygiene team. In one step, the shadow board can be lifted and cleaned, ready to return at any point. Whilst the shadow board is off the wall, the surface itself can also be cleaned, without the need to navigate any obstructions or awkward angles.

With early audit data from Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard suggesting sites need to pay closer attention to the cleaning of hard-to-reach areas, the mobility of magnetically mounted shadow boards could actually prove to be an advantage.

Another important point is that penetrating your factory walls, to drill fixings into them, will create an additional harbourage point. Although this isn’t an insurmountable problem, it will require your maintenance team to act immediately if a shadow board or alternate storage solution is moved – covering over the harbourage points immediately.

Permanent fixings could become an issue if your site regularly switches around production lines or if you identify an opportunity to become more efficient by moving around your equipment. Instead of being able to do this straight away, as you would be able to do with a magnetically mounted shadow board, you will have the additional step of lining up your maintenance team in advance.

Problem Three: the strength of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Another concern surrounding shadow boards with magnetic mounting is the strength of the finished board. Often sites will worry that, without fixings being drilled into the walls, there is no way for the board to hold the equipment they have in mind. This is rarely the case. Manufactured using fully certified, water repellent, anti-scuff materials, shadow boards can withstand even the harshest of factory environments. If you opt for a shadow board with a magnetic mount, there is the option of introducing additional magnets to account for any extra weight. This is something our in-house design team will be able to arrange.

If you are concerned that your equipment will be too heavy for a magnetic mounting, you can arrange to speak to one of our team members who will be able to look over your requirements and let you know if a magnetic fixing would be suitable for your site. You should also take a look at our Shadow Board Inspiration Guide, as it includes 70 examples of the equipment that can be successfully stored on a board. From engineering tools and custom machine parts to thermometers and PPE, there are designs for all shapes, sizes, and weights.

Problem Four: the mobility of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

If your site is often faced with missing equipment or operatives who rarely return their utensils to the right place, it is natural that you would worry about the mobility of shadow boards with magnetic mounting. After all, the last thing you want is for your shadow boards to be moved to the wrong factory wall or taken down by an operative who refuses to engage with them. Here, training is key, as your team needs to understand the fact that shadow boards could be saving them time and effort – making it easier for everyone to find the right equipment and speeding up the process of your hygiene team prepping for production.

Another point to remember is that, once the right training is in place, shadow boards should help to reduce the risk of missing equipment. Instead of utensils being hidden out of site or grouped together in an unhygienic bundle, shadow boards make equipment a feature of your factory, with the white shadows drawing attention to any missing tools. In terms of the shadow boards themselves, if you make specific operatives responsible for their position on the factory wall, this will help to ensure your magnetically mounted boards stay in the correct position.

Problem Five: the suitability of shadow boards with magnetic mounting

Perhaps the most obvious concern surrounding shadow boards with magnetic mounting is their suitability for sites that don’t have magnetic walls. You might be surprised to learn that this issue can actually be resolved.

Here at Klipspringer, we have worked with a number of production sites that don’t have magnetic walls, but still want to enjoy the benefits of a magnetic mount. In this instance, our solution has been to supply a steel composite that can be introduced to your factory walls, giving your magnetic shadow boards something to attach to.

You should also explore the other fixing methods available, as they could be an even better fit for your site. For example, Freestanding Static or Mobile shadow boards are ideal for sites with limited wall space or sites that need their utensils to be as close as possible to their production line. Other options include fixing your shadow boards to the wall or introducing a stand-off wall mounting.


So there you have it, a closer look at the top five issues surrounding shadow boards with magnetic mounting. We hope this article has helped to reveal that although these concerns are totally understandable, they are also worth revisiting – often unfounded or easy to resolve.

Even so, it is still important to consider all of the fixing options available, with each one offering its own benefits. We have also created an article that addresses the top five concerns surrounding Shadow Boards that could help you to decide if Shadow Boards really are the right fit for your factory.

The Klipspringer team will support you through this process. You can contact us on 01473461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. Another option is to use the button below to learn more about magnetic mounting.

If you would like further guidance relating to shadow boards and their different mounting options, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


    BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free

    Unpacking the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free, Issue Four

    Issue Four of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free has now been released. In this article, we will explore the key changes and additions to this new publication.

    With an initial release date of 1st November 2023 and a plan to commence audits on 1st May 2024, Issue 4 of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free was launched a little later than expected – published on February 6th 2024, with audits commencing on 1st August 2024. This delay allowed time for further development, with the new standard delivering unprecedented levels of assurance and value to its stakeholders.

    Globally applicable, and with certified sites in 35 countries, Issue Four of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free features an additional segment (Section Eight) that has been introduced in partnership with the Association of European Coeliac Societies (AOECS). As a consequence, certified sites, along with the brands that source from them, will be able to display the organisation’s crossed grain symbol on their packaging – the most recognised gluten-free symbol across Europe.

    Alongside the launch, BRCGS highlighted the fact that 91% of consumers have found their buying decisions are impacted by third party verification and 76% prefer products that have been certified by a recognised coeliac association. With this in mind, we felt it was important to unpack such an important publication, guiding you through any changes or additions.

    The following article consists of seven sections. You can use the links below to skip to the ones most relevant to your needs, but there are useful takeaways throughout:

    Clarity, Consistency, and Colour-Coding

    Smaller, more manageable clauses

    In the interest of making the Global Standard Gluten-Free easier to understand and adhere to, BRCGS has split the requirements into clauses that are far shorter than the ones featured in previous issues. The Standard offers the same amount of detail, in fact even more guidance has been added, but the clauses themselves are a more manageable length.

    The removal of two Appendices

    Another point of interest is that two Appendices from Issue 3 of the Global Standard Gluten-Free will be absent from Issue 4. The content will be available, but in the form of standalone guidance documents. These documents will be subject to periodic review.

    Colour-coding of requirements

    The requirements have now been colour-coded to indicate which elements will be audited as part of the assessment of the production areas and facilities and which elements will be audited as part of the assessment of the records system and documentation. The former will be a pale yellow, the latter will be grey, and any combined elements will be both colours.

    Position Statements from Issue 3

    In an effort to be consistent with the other Standards from BRCGS, the terminology featured in Issue 4 has been updated. You may also notice that the Position Statements relating to Issue 3 have now been incorporated into the new release.

    The Grading of Non-Conformities

    The non-conformities relating to Issue 4 of the Global Standard Gluten-Free have now been graded. This should make it easier for you to ensure your site meets the requirements of the Standard, as you will have a better understanding of the non-conformities or combination of non-conformities that will prevent your site from being certificated.

    The grading process will inform the frequency of your audits, along with the actions that need to take place following any non-conformities. For example, if your site receives seven or fewer minor non-conformities, you will need to provide objective evidence of your efforts to resolve the non-conformities within 28 days and your site will be audited every twelve months. Alternatively, if your site receives a major non-conformity, alongside 6-8 minor non-conformities, there will be a revisit scheduled to review the corrective action.

    Whenever you undergo an audit, the grading of any non-conformities will be reviewed by the independent certification process of the certification body. Throughout the lifetime of Issue 4, The BRCGS Technical Advisory Committee may also be asked to share a ruling on the grading of a non-conformity against a specific clause.

    Labelling and Pack Control

    One of the most noticeable changes between Issues 3 and 4 of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free is the addition of a section on Labelling and Pack Control. As Section 5 of the Standard, it includes guidance relating to product changeover and product label verification measures, along with packing line and packing area control measures. The three clauses in this section cover everything from the documented checks of your production line to the testing of online verification equipment e.g. bar code scanners. This guidance will help you to ensure the gluten-free products at your site are placed into the correct packaging and labelled correctly – protecting your customers and safe-guarding the future of your factory.

    The Management of Outsourced Processing

    Outsourced or Subcontracted Processing is when processing, storage, or another step in your production is completed by an external company or site. This term applies to a product that leaves your site partly-processed, has an intermediate step carried out externally, then returns to your site. Raw materials and ingredients that arrive at your site ready to be processed wouldn’t fall into this category and neither would a product that is sent out and does not return.

    Clause 3.5 of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free relates to the Management of Outsourced Processing. Below are four key points from this portion of the Standard. It’s important to note that they are summarised extracts, so you will need to read the Standard itself to fully understand the requirements.

    • If any processes are outsourced, the risks associated with gluten need to be included in your site’s food safety (HACCP) plan.
    • The approval process for outsourced processing needs to include a review of the procedures to prevent contamination.
    • You need to be able to prove that the outsourced processor is certificated to the BRCGS Standard Gluten-Free or meets a specific list of requirements.
    • You need to establish inspection and test procedures for products where part of the processing has been outsourced.

    Simplifying the 'Schedule A' Process

    BRCGS defines Schedule A as “a control and tracking document, listing the gluten-free products produced at a site which are intended to display BRCGS-managed trademarks and/or the ACELMEX trademark”.

    Issue 4 has seen the simplification of the Schedule A process for sites and certification bodies, with this topic covered in Section 6 of the Global Standard Gluten-Free. There are three clauses within this section:

    • Clause 6.1.1 details the correct approach to listing the products that display any of the trademarks covered by the Schedule A.
    • Clause 6.2.1 covers the communication of any amendments, listing the changes that sites are required to share with BRCGS.
    • Clause 6.3.1 explains what is required for a Schedule A to be considered valid e.g. signed and dated by BRCGS.

    Information Communication Technology and Remote Auditing

    BRCGS has also introduced the option of using information communication technology and remote auditing under specific circumstances. These circumstances include:

    A blended announced audit. This is only an option for sites that have already been certified. A risk assessment will also need to be carried out beforehand to confirm a robust audit is possible and to assess the percentage of the audit that can be carried out remotely.

    Once these points have been confirmed, the process will be split into a remote audit followed by an on-site inspection. The remote aspect will focus on the documented systems and records, whereas the on-site audit will take a closer look at gluten-free production, storage, and other on-site areas.

    Information Communication Technology and remote auditing may also come into play during the closing-out of any non-conformities. Depending on the circumstances and the grading of the non-conformities, it may be possible to assess corrective actions, root cause analysis, and preventative action plans remotely. This decision will be made by the certifying body. If approved, either a remote audit of the corrective action will be carried out or suitable documentary evidence will be shared.

    Finally, ICT and remote auditing could also be an option if you work for one of many sites, with multiple locations managed by a head office or central function. These centrally managed systems will need to be included within the audit and there are two ways for this to be achieved:

    • Any relevant information from the head office will be requested and reviewed during the audit of the site in question.
    • The head office will undergo a separate audit, splitting the auditing process into two distinct steps.

    The first approach will only be possible is satisfactory links can be established with the central function and it is possible to review and challenge the necessary information remotely.

    Section 8: AOECS Specific Requirements

    Section 8 is perhaps the most exciting addition to Issue 4 of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free. Whilst Sections 1-7 are applicable to all operations, the requirements of Section 8 are reserved for sites that:

    • Produce products within the scope of the AOECS Standard
    • Can prove that they are, or intend to be, a Crossed Grain Trademark licence holder
    • Supply their products to actual or potential licence holders

    Within Section 8 of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free, there are six clauses to consider:

    • Clause 8.1.1 relates to supplier approval and purchasing, incoming ingredients, and inputs.
    • Clause 8.2.1 outlines the expectations surrounding product recalls and withdrawal.
    • Clause 8.3.1 details the AOECS Standard for food labels used on Gluten-Free foods.
    • Clause 8.4.1 details the marketing claims that can be made alongside the trademark.
    • Clause 8.5.1 states the circumstances under which the crossed grain trademark can be used.
    • Clause 8.6.1 details the laboratory and testing requirements.


    Access a copy of the BRCGS Global Standard Gluten-Free, Issue 4 using the button below.

    If you would like any support in meeting the specifications outlined within Issue 4, Klipspringer has been helping sites to exceed audit expectations for over 20 years. We would be more than happy to provide help and guidance as you work through the requirements. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation

    If you would like further guidance relating to audit compliance, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


      walls and doors

      How to Clean and Maintain the Walls and Doors at Your Food Production Site

      One of the most valuable takeaways from the early audit data shared by BRCGS has been the importance of walls and doors when it comes to securing audit compliance.

      Here at Klipspringer, we have spent over twenty years helping sites across the UK and Ireland to exceed their audit expectations and we wanted to provide further support by creating a guide to avoiding this common area of non-conformity.

      Addressing five relevant clauses from Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard, this article will guide you through the process of ensuring your walls and doors are in keeping with the latest auditing standards.

      What does the early BRCGS audit data tell us about the importance of Walls and Doors?

      The top minor non-conformities

      Early audit data from BRCGS indicates there are five minor non-conformities that are causing sites the most problems so far.

      • Clause 4.11.1 relates to the hygiene levels of a site’s equipment and premises
      • Clause 4.9.1.1 relates to the use, storage, and handling of non-food chemicals
      • Clause 4.6.2 relates to the design and construction of equipment
      • Clause 4.4.8 relates to the condition and hygiene levels of a site’s doors
      • Clause 4.4.1  relates to the condition and hygiene levels of a site’s walls

      As you can see, Clause 4.4.8 directly references doors and Clause 4.4.1 directly references walls. It is interesting to note that both clauses have the exact wording as when they originally appeared in Issue 8 of the Global Food Safety Standard, first published in 2018. This suggests, that despite the five years between the publication of Issue 8 and Issue 9, sites are still struggling to avoid non-conformities in this area.

      The top minor non-conformities relating to hygiene

      In a recent webinar with Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon and Foram Mehta, the Global Standards Technical Manager at BRCGS, early audit data was also used to identify the top non-conformities related to hygiene.

      • Clause 4.11.1 relates to the hygiene levels of a site’s equipment and premises
      • Clause 4.11.2 outlines BRCGS expectations surrounding documented cleaning procedures
      • Clause 4.11.6 details the specific requirements for cleaning equipment
      • Clause 4.11.8.1 relates to your site’s environmental monitoring programme
      • Clause 4.11.3 is centred on cleaning performance limits

      With Clause 4.11.1, Clause 4.11.2 and Clause 4.11.3 applicable to walls and doors, three out of the top five hygiene-related non-conformities require you to take a closer look at this aspect of your operation. From the hygiene levels of your walls and doors to the way in which you validate your cleans, this is a prime opportunity for you to take a step closer to audit compliance.

      Clause 4.4.1

      "Walls shall be finished and maintained to prevent the accumulation of dirt, minimise condensation and mould growth, and facilitate cleaning."

      You need to ensure the structure and material of your walls is hygienic – befitting of a food production site. Even if this was the case at the point of installation, your walls may have degraded over time, so it is essential that you conduct regular inspections to identify any areas where maintenance needs to be carried out. Ideally, you should ask your Hygiene Manager to accompany you, as your Hygiene Team will be the ones responsible for keeping the walls up to spec. Another vital step is to assess anything that is hanging on your walls. Have you opted for a hygienic mounting method or are there any harbourage points?

      Clause 4.4.8

      "Doors (both internal and external) shall be maintained in good condition."

      The doors at your site need to be close fitting, sealed correctly and pest proof. They also need to be well looked after, with any maintenance carried out immediately. Another idea is to install self-cleaning antimicrobial door handles, levers, and push plates. Capable of killing 99.9% of bacteria, these handles could provide you with a hassle-free way to raise hygiene standards across your site. Finally, you need to ensure the correct doors are closed during production, as this could be another point of non-conformity. If your site struggles with this, a Wireless Monitoring System will allow you to automatically track door contact.

      Clause 4.11.1

      "The premises and equipment shall be maintained in a clean and hygienic condition."

      It is essential that your operatives are using the right tools for the job. After all, a standard piece of cleaning equipment is unlikely to have the angles and ergonomics to effectively clean the walls and doors of your site. When it comes to the walls, condensation squeegees and high reach handles will prove invaluable. These utensils could also be used for smooth factory doors, with smaller detail brushes allowing you to clean around any handles or fixings. In terms of maintenance, your approach shouldn’t just be reactive, but also preventative. Your maintenance team should be protecting the integrity of your site at every stage.

      Clause 4.11.2

      "Documented cleaning and disinfection procedures shall be in place and maintained for the building, plant and all equipment." [EXTRACT ONLY]

      If the walls and doors of your site don’t already feature heavily in your internal inspections, now is the time to address this issue. They should also be a key focus of your site training and Cleaning Instruction Cards. The detailed documentation of the cleaning and disinfection procedures at your site will educate and motivate your operatives – helping them to understand what an ‘appropriate’ wall and door looks like and what steps need to be taken to get there. The correct documentation will also reassure your auditor, as they will be able to check that the correct processes are in place and are being carried out on a regular basis.

      Clause 4.11.3

      "Acceptable levels of cleaning may be defined by visual appearance, ATP bioluminescence techniques, microbiological testing, allergen testing or chemical testing as appropriate." [EXTRACT ONLY]

      The ATP bioluminescence techniques mentioned above can be used to validate the cleanliness of any surface, suitable for your walls and doors. If you already carry out ATP testing at your site, it is worth noting that the benchmarks for these surfaces will be higher, as they shouldn’t be coming into contact with your product. Another point to consider is that standard ATP tests are only able to detect ATP (a molecule found in all organic residue), whereas the A3 system can detect adenosine molecules in all three forms: ATP, ADP, and AMP – even after a surface is exposed to heat and cleaning chemicals.


      That brings us to the end of our guide to avoiding the non-conformities relating to the doors and walls of your factory. As with any matter of audit compliance, the process will be ongoing and will require the cooperation of your operatives. You will also be tasked with taking a closer look at your site – identifying the areas where you are operating effectively, along with any areas where there is room for improvement.

      If you would like our support with this process or would be interested in learning more about the solutions mentioned in this article, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

      If you would like further guidance, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


        Food Safety Culture

        What is Food Safety Culture?

        What do we mean by Food Safety Culture? Why is it important? and What is the best strategy for achieving a positive Food Safety Culture at your site?

        From Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard to a whole host of industry forums and webinars, Food Safety Culture has proven to be an important topic within the industry of food and beverage production. But what exactly do we mean by: Food Safety Culture?

        What’s more, how can we tell if a positive or negative culture exists? After all, ‘culture’ isn’t something tangible, easy to filter into a graph or spreadsheet.

        With this in mind, we’ve decided to answer the question: What is Food Safety Culture? We will also explore what is possible when a positive culture is in place and how best to prevent a negative culture from taking over your site.

        #1 What is Culture?

        In a recent webinar on Culture In Hygiene, Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon referred to culture as a living organism. He made the point that, just like a living thing, if you neglect a culture, it will go bad, but if you nurture a culture correctly, it will become self-sustaining.

        This understanding of culture can be directly applied to the subject of Food Safety. After all, it will be impossible for you to achieve a positive Food Safety Culture at your site unless you fully engage with the process – keeping a close eye on its development and taking responsibility for its growth.

        Another important point is that culture starts at the top of an organisation, with senior management setting the tone for the operatives working underneath them. A Senior Leadership Team that constantly knocks back proposals to hire more operatives, lengthen the hygiene window, or invest in new equipment, could send the message that reducing expenses is the only thing that matters. Under these conditions, even operatives who are directly responsible for food safety may switch their focus to cutting costs, believing this is the best way to secure recognition.

        The support of your operatives will also be lost if the culture at your site is all words and no action. All too often discussions surrounding culture remain hypothetical, with teams sharing plenty of buzz words and metaphors, but failing to establish clear action points and targets. Ideally, you need to think about where you want the culture at your site to be by the end of a set time period. You then need to figure out the best way to get your site to reach these targets, welcoming the input of department leads and carrying out root cause analysis to identify fail-proof solutions.

        #2 What does a good culture achieve?

        In another Klipspringer webinar, Denis Treacy, the former Chief Officer for Safety and Quality at Pladis Global, talked about The Dupont Bradley Curve. A helpful tool in discussions surrounding culture, The Dupont Bradley Curve suggests there are four different states of internal culture.

        In a reactive culture, operatives have to rely on their natural instincts. Instead of pre-empting risks to food safety, they will respond to isolated incidents – failing to identify any patterns or carry out root cause analysis to prevent the problem from occurring again.

        In a dependent culture, operatives are motivated by the directions they are given and the feedback they receive. This puts strain on department managers, as they will know that without supervision, food safety measures will fall to the wayside. What’s more, even a dedicated manager can’t be everywhere at once, so there is still a chance that food safety risks will go undetected.

        In an independent culture, supervision isn’t the motivating factor. Even if you took away audits, inspections, and department leads, certain pockets of people would continue to do the right thing as a matter of personal pride and responsibility. Standards are inconsistent in this culture, with some operatives more dependable than others, but there are heroes in every department.

        Finally, an interdependent culture sees everyone on site doing the right thing, with or without supervision. Instead of working independently, operatives come together as a team, holding each other accountable and contributing to a culture of care and compliance. Denis made the point that, within this culture, Zero Defect Food Safety becomes a realistic choice.

        #3 Why does a culture 'go bad' and what are the solutions?

        Lack of training

        It is impossible to nurture a positive food safety culture without the ongoing training of your team. This training needs to be reflective of everyone at your factory, suitable for agency staff, operatives who don’t have English as their first language, inexperienced team members, as well as individuals who have become used to standards and processes from other sites.

        Behind every session should be the ‘why?’ that informs the standards being shared with your operatives. Fortunately the ‘why?’ behind Food Safety is particularly compelling, with the health and lives of your customers at risk. Operatives that understand this will be more likely to uphold your expectations, especially if you highlight the fact that their every day decisions could have a serious knock-on effect.

        Once you have motivated and inspired your team, you need to make sure they know how to uphold exemplary standards of Food Safety. Your operatives need to understand what equipment to use, which processes to follow, and who is responsible for each application. This will need to be made clear through training, but also the signs around your site and your detailed, highly-visual Cleaning Instruction Cards. Ill-informed operatives will be forced to act on instinct, with the dangers of a reactive culture explored above. To avoid this, it is essential that your team has all the information they need to make the right choices.

        Poor work environment

        Another threat to the Food Safety Culture at your site is a poor work environment. Even the most conscientious of operatives will struggle in an environment that is outdated, unsafe, and under-funded. From degraded equipment that needs to be replaced to inaccessible areas that are impossible to clean, there are a number of factors that could be undermining the Food Safety standards at your site. Here, there is not only the risk of multiple non-conformities, but also a risk to the overall attitude at your site, with operatives frustrated and demoralised.

        To avoid this, you will need to carry out a site inspection, identifying any hard-to-reach areas and harbourage points. You should also look out for any inappropriate or ineffective equipment, any issues with your equipment storage, and any signs of damage to your site’s PPE. It is also crucial that you take the time to speak with your operatives, and find out what they think of their current working environment. Change starts from the top down, so displaying an enthusiasm to make improvements should motivate your team and reassure them of your commitment to Food Safety.

        A culture of confusion

        Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard highlights the importance of validation, with sites expected to validate their cleaning processes – proving their suitability and effectiveness. With this in mind, it is essential that your team is working with the right information and has a clear understanding of what it takes to operate within a culture of Food Safety.

        This is the perfect time to evaluate your site’s current approach to Hygiene Monitoring. Is it as effective as it could be? Are there any anomalies that need to be explained? Do your operatives understand how to act on the results of each test? All of these questions need to be answered, as the easier it is for your team to validate their work, the more likely they are to engage with the development of a positive Food Safety Culture.

        Another important step is to give your Hygiene Manager a seat at the table – involving your site’s Hygiene Team in essential conversations. This will not only give your Hygiene Manager the chance to share their expertise, but will also make it clear to everyone at your site that Food Safety is a priority. Instead of operatives wondering whether their focus should be on cutting costs, saving time, and pushing through product development, there won’t be any confusion surrounding the importance of Food Safety.


        Now that we’ve answered the question: What is Food Safety Culture? and provided an explanation of what causes both a positive and negative approach to food safety, we hope you have a clear plan for enhancing the culture at your own site. From the ongoing training of your operatives to a second-look at your factory environment, there are so many positive steps for you to explore.

        Here at Klipspringer, we have been helping sites to achieve a positive food safety culture for over twenty years. If you would appreciate further guidance on this subject or to learn more about any of the solutions mentioned in this article, you can contact us on 01473 461800
        or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch.

        If you would like further guidance relating to the solutions outlined in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


          questions

          Klipspringer's Frequently Asked Questions

          Here at Klipspringer, we are always so happy to welcome new customers – keen to support you as you hit ambitious targets, reduce downtime and equipment costs, support your site staff, and surpass those all-important audit expectations. In the interest of answering any initial questions you might have, we have created an FAQ list to cover everything you need to know at this early stage.

          Our Frequently Asked Questions fall into the seven categories listed below. You can use the links to jump to the section most relevant to your needs. If you don’t find your question on this page, there is also the option of sharing your own question(s) and a member of the Klipspringer team will be in touch. We aim to respond to all enquiries within two working hours – go on, put us to the test!

          Finding the right solution

          How do I know which product is right for my application? 

          Our friendly team of experts has years of experience within the world of food manufacturing and processing. You can reach out to us by phone, email or live chat and we will be more than happy to advise.

          Can I arrange a site visit or product demo? 

          Yes! We are always willing to discuss site challenges or improvements face-to-face, either on site or virtually. This includes shadow board surveys, colour-coding consultations and product training/demonstrations. Please contact our team for more information.

          Placing an order

          How do I place my order? 

          Orders can be placed online at portal.klipspringer.com. You can also email sales@klipspringer.com or contact us by phone on 01473 461800. 

          Is there a minimum order value?  

          No, there is no minimum order value. However, UK orders under £300 net, along with ROI and Northern Ireland orders under £500 net will attract a delivery charge. 

          Can I order on credit? 

          Yes! If you do not currently have credit facilities in place, please contact our friendly team on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com and we will be pleased to send through further details. Subject to relevant checks being completed, you will then be granted a credit account that will allow you to place orders using just a Purchase Order reference.  

          What are your lead times? 

          All stocked items ordered before 4pm are despatched the same day, for next-working day delivery to mainland UK. Please allow 2-3 working days for delivery to Northern Ireland, ROI, Scottish Highlands & Off shore Islands. Instrument calibrations are normally completed within 2-3 working days. The standard lead time for shadow boards and signage is 5-7 working days from approval of visual proofs. Items that have been made to order, such as tapered trucks and bins, are delivered in 10-15 working days. 

          Klipspringer's pricing policy

          Where can I find my pricing? 

          All pricing for standard product lines can be viewed at: portal.klipspringer.com. Please login to ensure the prices shown are correct for your account. If you require a quotation for customisable products such as shadow boards and custom signage, please get in touch with our sales team for your personalised quotation as prices vary dependent on product size and specification. 

          Can I get a discount for bulk purchases? 

          Many products are available to purchase in case quantities, with a discounted price per item. To view case quantity information, please view the product page on the portfolio or speak with a member of our team. Some products, such as food handling storage containers and metal detectable pens, use a quantity-break pricing structure.

          Calibration and Service

          Do thermometers come with calibration? 

          As standard, most of our technical items are supplied with a Certificate of Conformity which states that the instrument is working according to the manufacturer’s specifications. If you require UKAS or traceable calibration, please request this at the time of placing your order. Click here for more details on Klipspringer’s calibration services.  

          How can I obtain copies of my calibration certificates? 

          Copies of your calibration certificates can be downloaded from your online account. Simply click here, log into your online account, then click on ‘My Equipment & Calibrations’. Here you will find the relevant instrument and can view the certificate, along with the date that the re-calibration is due. 

          What is included in my instrument’s service? 

          As part of our commitment to go above and beyond for our customers, all instruments received for calibration or repair will be given a complimentary service free of charge. This includes inspecting and cleaning the instrument and checking both the calibration and battery. 

          Shadow boards and Visual Management

          Can I customise my shadow boards and signage? 

          Yes! The majority of the shadow boards and visual management solutions designed and manufactured by Klipspringer are bespoke to customer requirements. This includes size and mounting options, along with the colours, text, and branding, and the equipment stored on the shadow boards. 

          How do I check I am happy with my shadow board and signage designs? 

          Before production commences, full visual proofs will be produced and sent out by our design team for customer approval. Changes can still be made at this point, and nothing will be printed or manufactured until sign-off has been received.

          Audit Compliance

          Are all products food grade? 

          Many Klipspringer tools and utensils are approved for contact with food, and this is made clear through the Product Descriptions and Technical Specifications that accompany each item on the website. You can also use the search function available at portal.klipspringer.com to find suitable equipment, with Documents of Compliance for all food grade products available via the Downloads section.  

          Is there a standard colour-coding policy?  

          The short answer is no; however, the food production industry does have some common themes surrounding the colours used for food contact, non-food contact, external areas, and allergen equipment. Our team would be more than happy to advise you on this matter, and Klipspringer Director Alex Carlyon has even put together a guide on simplifying your colour-coding policy

          Helpful Resources and Industry Events

          Do you supply any educational resources?

          The Klipspringer Hub is your go-to resource for blogs, news articles, webinars, help guides, and videos. Here, you will find content relating to every aspect of food and beverage production, covering everything from checking oil quality and allergen segregation to cleaning your SegriScreens and and foreign body prevention.

          Are there any in-person events that I can attend?

          In 2023, in collaboration with FoodClean, we launched the Food Safety Innovation Conference. This forum shines a light on true innovation, challenges the status quo, and advances food safety and hygiene. Returning to the University of Lincoln on Thursday 13th June 2024, you can click here to register your interest in attending. You should also look out for the Industry Forums that we host each year.

          Can I find out about the other sites you have worked with?

          Of course! As the leading food safety compliance partner for food and beverage businesses across the UK & Ireland, we have been supporting sites for over twenty years. Working with brands including McCain Foods, Quorn Foods, Tesco, Five Guys, and Whitbread, we serve over 4,000 industry customers. Highlighting some of our key partnerships, we have a series of informative Case Studies for you to explore.

          If you have any other questions, we would be happy to help with your enquiry. Share your details below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch.


            Hygiene Equipment

            How do I know when my Hygiene Equipment needs to be replaced?

            When it comes to the replacement of your hygiene equipment, it is impossible to provide a specific time frame that is applicable to all sites. This is because the lifespan of your utensils is dependent on the applications they are being used for, the culture at your factory, the attitude of your operatives, and the way in which your equipment is being cleaned and stored.

            Having said that, it is possible to closely manage your hygiene equipment – embracing a fail-safe approach to identifying any damage or breakages long before site inspections or customer visits take place.

            To help make this possible, we have put together a guide to working out when your equipment needs to be updated. This article also contains advice on extending the lifespan of your utensils, detailing the key questions you need to ask yourself in order to secure success. There is useful information in each section, but you can use the links below to skip to the subject most relevant to your needs:

            Are Visual Checks a key part of your site’s culture?

            Is your equipment storage highly visible?

            Are your operatives remembering to clean their cleaning equipment?

            Do your operatives know what ‘acceptable’ and ‘unacceptable’ looks like?

            Can you spot any mistakes or examples of misuse?

            Have you spoken to your equipment provider?

            Do your operatives understand the risks of waiting too long to replace equipment?

            Are Visual Checks a key part of your site's culture?

            The best way to work out whether your equipment needs to be replaced is through Visual Checks. These checks should take place before and after each utensil is used. They should also be instinctive, carried out as you walk around the site and take in the equipment around you. Of course, inspections and customer visits will draw attention to equipment-related non-conformities, but it should never get to this point. Instead, you need these checks to be ingrained in your company’s culture, with operatives at all levels consistently on the lookout for any signs of damage or degradation.

            Is your equipment storage highly visible?

            The right storage solution will extend the lifespan of your hygiene equipment, reducing the risk of cross contamination and the damage of your utensils between use. Ideally, it will also move your equipment into a highly visible space, as this makes it more likely that any issues will be spotted immediately. Instead of visual checks being left to individual operatives, everyone on site will share a collective responsibility for the identification of any food safety or foreign body risks. What’s more, your auditors and customers will be immediately reassured of your commitment to using quality equipment.

            Are your operatives remembering to clean their cleaning equipment?

            It is impossible to overstate the importance of making sure your operatives are cleaning their cleaning equipment. In fact, a lot of the sites we work with, have a helpful reminder placed at the top of their shadow boards. Cleaning equipment will not only extend its lifespan, but will also increase the likelihood of any issues being identified.

            Instead of broken bristles, torn squeegees, or chipped scrapers hiding under dirt and debris, the cleaning process will uncover any problems.

            Proper cleaning will also reduce the risk of hygiene equipment breaking during use. Take, for example, a brush that has been used alongside harsh cleaning chemicals. If this brush is stored away without being cleaned, these chemicals will degrade the PBT bristles and make them much more likely to snap. Alternatively, if the brush is cleaned correctly, it has every chance of withstanding the application it was designed for.

            Do your operatives know what 'acceptable' and 'unacceptable' looks like?

            Far too often, blame will fall on the shoulders of a hygiene team before a proper root cause analysis has taken place. Instead of jumping to the conclusion that your operatives don’t care if the equipment at your site is damaged or broken, it is worth considering whether or not they understand what ‘acceptable’ and ‘unacceptable’ utensils look like.

            After all, a lot of your operatives may be agency staff who are unfamiliar with your site’s standards. Even permanent team members may be under the impression that if a piece of hygiene equipment is hanging up, it must be suitable for use. Depending on the culture at your site, your team could also believe that the priority is getting the job done as quickly as possible, without taking time to worry about sub-par equipment.

            Acceptable

            Unacceptable

            One of the best ways to ensure your site has a positive culture is to highlight your visual standards. You can do this by introducing helpful visuals to your Cleaning Equipment Cards, putting up signs around your site, or creating a separate document dedicated to a visual comparison of ‘appropriate’ and ‘inappropriate’ equipment. We have also seen sites introduce these images to their shadow boards, as this is a great way to ensure standards are reinforced every time equipment is reached for or put away.

            From damaged bristles and splintered edges to soiled utensils that are far too dirty to clean, your operatives need to know when a piece of equipment has reached the end of its lifespan. They also need to be trained on what to do if they spot an issue with the equipment. Do they know who is in charge of sourcing a replacement? Do they understand the importance of raising an issue before their shift instead of after it? Do they believe their efforts will be appreciated? All of these questions will need to be addressed during your ongoing training sessions.

            It is also worth thinking about how easy it is for the relevant operatives to source replacements, with a simple process likely to increase engagement. One solution is to introduce QR codes to your shadow boards, with these codes allowing designated operatives to order equipment at the click of a button. The Klipspringer Online Portal is another helpful resource, as it allows you to save previous orders and favourite specific items – cutting down on the time it takes to secure new equipment.

            Can you spot any mistakes or examples of misuse?

            Another important step is to identify any instances of the hygiene equipment at your site being misused. Common examples include plastic scrapers being used for extremely stubborn residues, squeegees being dragged over sharp metal bolts on the factory floor, and brushes with extra soft bristles being used to tackle tough residues that require significant agitation.

            In all of these instances, equipment is being exposed to unnecessary risks – used for the wrong application and likely to be damaged as a result. With more durable or suitable options available, there is no reason for this to happen.

            Even if the right equipment is being used for each application, it is possible that mistakes were made during the initial ordering process. Perhaps someone at your site arranged for your utensils to be engraved, unknowingly creating harbourage points for bacteria and running the risk of a non-conformity. Here, a solution is to switch to IndeliMarked equipment that can be branded with essential information without compromising any hygiene or food safety requirements.

            Another possibility is that someone at your site opted for resin-set brushware instead of standard hygiene brushware, unaware of the possible risks involved. Or, it could be that your site’s senior leadership switched to metal-detectable equipment off the back of a customer complaint, without working through the pros and cons of this decision. This could be your opportunity to do the research and select a more suitable option for your site.

            Have you spoken to your equipment provider?

            When it comes to researching the best hygiene equipment for your site, the responsibility shouldn’t be yours alone. Instead, you should draw on the industry experience of your equipment provider. Say there is an issue with the utensil you are using for a specific application and you are concerned about how often you are sourcing replacements. A trust-worthy supplier will help you get to the bottom of the problem. From refining your processes and sourcing alternative equipment to providing educational resources for the training of your operatives, the support of your provider should extend beyond the initial purchase.

            Do your operatives understand the risks of waiting too long to replace equipment?

            The final step is to make sure everyone at your site understands the consequences of waiting too long to replace equipment. Ideally this will come from the top down, with Senior Management ensuring this is an integral part of your company’s culture.

            When stressing the importance of this issue, the key points to highlight are as follows. Damaged or broken equipment poses both a foreign body and food safety risk. This could result in a non-conformance, a failed audit, factory closure, and the loss of employment for everyone at your site. It could also have serious consequences for your customers, causing serious illness or even a fatality. On a daily basis, sub-par equipment will also result in an ineffective process, slowing down production and frustrating operatives. This could impact employee retention and the overall atmosphere of your site.


            So there you have it, an answer to the question: How do I know when my Hygiene Equipment needs to be replaced? As with so many aspects of running a successful food or beverage production site, a proactive approach is key. Waiting for an external inspection, a non-conformance, or a customer complaint will leave you in a vulnerable position, so you need to be tackling any issues with your equipment head on.

            Here at Klipspringer, we have been supplying hygiene equipment for over twenty years and we would be more than happy to help you with any queries relating to this matter. If you would appreciate further guidance on replacing your equipment, finding the right utensil for each application, or extending the lifespan of your hygiene tools, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

            If you would like further guidance relating to the solutions mentioned in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


              Portal

              Your Klipspringer Online Account: The Benefits of Using Our Digital Platform

              The Key Benefits of Using Your Online Portal

              • Order online on credit, using just your PO reference.
              • Save favourite products for future orders.
              • Access invoices and statements.
              • View and reorder from past order history.
              • Avoid non-conformances from missing certificates.
              • Check version numbers and last update dates to reconcile existing copies.
              • Save time preparing audit paperwork.
              • View and download all relevant product conformity certificates in one place.
              • Download calibration certificates.
              • View calibration dates and statuses.
              • Track equipment undergoing calibration.
              • Rename equipment items for easy identification and management.
              • Arrange calibration, service or repair returns to Klipspringer's Service Centre.
              • Change equipment status & add new items.

              You can learn more about these benefits in the following article. Alternatively, if you are ready to set up your account, simply click the button below:


              Here at Klipspringer, we are always on the lookout for opportunities to make life easier for the sites we work with. After all, the world of food and beverage production is a demanding one, with constant pressures to cut spending, speed up production, retain operatives, raise hygiene standards, and secure audit compliance.

              This was the thought process behind launching Klipspringer’s Online Portal, a digital platform that simplifies the process of you ordering, reordering, documenting, and calibrating your equipment.

              Below is a video tutorial that will take you through each step of creating and accessing your online account. If you have any questions about this process, we would be happy to help you with this matter and can be contacted via the ‘Contact Us’ button at the top of your online web portal.

              Now that you know how to set up your account, below is a more detailed breakdown of the benefits you can expect to enjoy.

              #1 Order your equipment online

              First and foremost, you can use the web portal to order your equipment. This is a quick and easy way for you to secure your site essentials, placing an order in just a few simple steps. When using the online portal, you even have the option to order on credit, using just your PO reference.

              To ensure this platform is as user-friendly as possible, we have introduced a range of new functions:

              Instead of adding the same products to your basket one-by-one, you can create saved order lists. Simply login to your account, add the relevant products to your basket, and click the ‘New Order List’ button to view your finished list. You will then have the option of naming, editing, and loading this list directly into your basket. You can have multiple lists saved at a time and they will be available to any colleagues who share your account.

              Another key function involves saving your favourite products. All Klipspringer products are accompanied by a heart button that, when pressed, automatically adds an item to your favourites list. This list can be accessed via the ‘My Account’ button in the top right of your portal screen and then the ‘My Favourites’ button. This will allow you to add your favourite products to your basket quickly and easily.

              #2 Access certificates via your Audit Portal

              You can use your Audit Portal to access and download certificates for the products you have purchased from Klipspringer over the past twenty-four months.

              If you are looking for a specific certificate, the search function will take you there immediately. Alternatively, if you want to download all your certificates in one go, you can complete this action with the click of a button.

              Thanks to this online resource, you and your auditors can rest assured that your Klipspringer products are compliant and safe to use.

              #3 Manage your equipment and calibrations

              Your Equipment and Calibrations Portal offers an easy and independent way for you to manage your serial numbered instrumentation products from Klipspringer. Instead of wondering when your next calibration is due, you can access this information online.

              Preparing for audits will also become a lot easier, as the portal holds all your relevant certificates and is updated with every new purchase. On the subject of new purchases, this portal acts as a useful tool for finding product codes from your previous orders, handy for when you want to call them in again.

              Finally, storing your certificates online will make it easier to meet your sustainability targets. It will also save you and your operatives the hassle of sorting through piles of paperwork.


              Making the most of your online portal doesn’t mean you have to go it alone. Instead, you will enjoy all the benefits of going digital, but will also have the support of the Klipspringer team whenever you want to speak to someone in person. Contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com, and one of our friendly team members will be happy to guide you through the process of accessing this platform.

              Alternatively, if you are ready to set up your account, follow the link below to complete this process in just a few simple steps.


              ATP

              Seafood and Fish Processing: What is the best approach to Hygiene Monitoring?

              This article explores the importance of effective Hygiene Monitoring within the fish, seafood, and fish processing industry. It also provides an in depth comparison of conventional ATP testing against the A3 system - an improved ATP methodology.

              In the seafood, fish, and fish processing industry, it is impossible to overstate the importance of effective hygiene monitoring. After all, this sector deals with three of the 14 major allergens and faces the added concern of histamine toxicity.

              Despite being a varied sector, with sites producing everything from raw sushi to canned tuna, the detection of organic material is an essential process across every site. This has led to an industry-wide examination of hygiene monitoring – a movement that has exposed the limitations of conventional ATP testing and resulted in many factories moving over to a more accurate and reliable approach: the A3 system.

              With this in mind, we have created a guide to validating the cleanliness of your factory. In this article we will cover all of the areas listed below. There is helpful content in each section, but you can also use the links to skip to the subject most relevant to your site.

              #1 Is ATP testing a reliable approach to Hygiene Monitoring?

              #2 Is there a more reliable approach to Hygiene Monitoring?

              #3 How different are the results produced by conventional ATP tests and A3 technology?

              #4 Why is A3 technology especially suited to seafood and fish processing?

              • The dominant adenylates in seafood and fish
              • The relationship between ATP and salt
              • The nature of the food residues being tested
              • Handwashing in the fish processing industry
              • A3 and allergen testing
              • A3 and Histamine detection

              #5 How do I roll out the A3 system?

              Is ATP testing a reliable approach to Hygiene Monitoring?

              You will recognise ATP testing as a conventional approach to Hygiene Monitoring. It has existed as the preferred method for a number of years, due to the fact that ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a molecule found in every living organism.

              When ATP is detected, it generates a high reading for RLU (relative light units). If an ATP test shares a high RLU reading, this indicates a high level of organic residue and a breeding ground for bacteria.

              Sites have typically used this reading to determine if a surface or piece of equipment is in need of further cleaning. They have also assumed that if the same surface or piece of equipment passes an ATP test and generates a low reading for RLU, this is evidence of an effective clean and the absence of any organic residue. Unfortunately, this is not the case.

              ATP is an unstable molecule that degrades in certain processes – including heating, blanching, fermentation, processing, and cleaning. It degrades to ADP and AMP, becoming undetectable to ATP tests. Although it becomes undetectable, the organic residue is still there and needs to be dealt with by your operatives. After all, this residue is an excellent breeding ground for bacteria and this next generation of bacteria could include ATP.

              Is there a more reliable approach to Hygiene Monitoring?

              Unlike conventional ATP tests, A3 technology can detect adenosine molecules in all three forms: ATP, ADP, and AMP. Consequently, it is able to provide an accurate reading of how clean a surface is even after processes such as heating, blanching, and cleaning have taken place.

              As mentioned above, ATP generates an RLU reading, with the amount of ATP on a surface measured in relation to the intensity of luminescence emitted during an ATP test. When ATP is in an unfavourable environment (exposed to heat, acids, alkalis, and enzymes), it tries to conserve energy by reducing the intensity of luminescence emitted. This is why ADP and AMP become undetectable to standard ATP tests.

              In contrast, A3 technology introduces ATP recycling enzymes that allow for conversion between all three adenosine molecules. It introduces the PK Enzyme to convert ADP to ATP and the PPDK Enzyme to convert AMP to ATP. The introduction of these enzymes allows the A3 system to carry out a simultaneous measurement of ATP, ADP, and AMP.

              What exactly is the A3 system?

              The LUMITESTER A3 SMART System detects all organic residue and microorganisms on surfaces and in liquids. It combines measurements of ATP, ADP, and AMP to determine cleanliness – sharing accurate results in a matter of seconds.

              The system includes a lightweight device that is auto-calibrated and allows you to set your own limits for pass/fail results. As with a conventional ATP test, you simply insert a swab into the meter to generate a reading, but unlike a conventional ATP test, this swab contains recycled enzymes that allow the A3 system to detect adenosine molecules in all three forms.

              You can then store and access your data via the Lumitester App.

              • Highest visibility of organic residue
              • Includes ADP and AMP measurements to show you what you've been missing
              • Generates results in around ten seconds
              • All-in-one solution saves time and cost
              • Use the Bluetooth app to view and analyse the data you collect
              • Cloud storage allows you to access results at any time, from any location
              • Track overall inspection scores with graphs
              • Ongoing support from Klipspringer and a dedicated team of microbiologists

              Working in conjunction with the A3 handheld device, the LuciPac A3 Swabs introduces enzymes that enable the simultaneous detection of all three forms of the adenosine molecule. The range includes: Surface Swabs, Pre-moistened Surface Swabs, and Water Swabs.

              • Highly sensitive A3 (ATP+ADP+AMP) detection
              • Surface swabs, Pre-moistened Surface Swabs, and Water Swabs available
              • Shelf life: 15 months after production date
              • Storage requirements: 2-8°C, do not freeze
              • AOAC Certified
              • No chemical residue left behind after sampling/smearing

              How different are the results produced by conventional ATP tests and A3 technology?

              The graphs below show the results of an A3 system in comparison to a conventional ATP test. As you can see, both systems are detecting canned tuna, along with raw oyster, shrimp, tuna, salmon, and sea bream.

              Even though the devices are testing the same surface, the results differ dramatically. The A3 System provides high RLU readings across the board, whereas, the standard ATP tests pass every surface. This discrepancy demonstrates the importance of introducing the recycled enzymes mentioned above. Without them, the ATP swabs indicate there is hardly any ATP present and suggest the surface is in no further need of cleaning.

              In contrast, the A3 system uses the PK and PPDK Enzymes to convert ADP and AMP to ATP, generating a much higher and much more accurate reading.

              If your site handles fish, seafood, or any other organic material, there is every chance that your ATP tests are currently passing surfaces that require further cleaning – unable to detect the AMP and ADP molecules that are still present on the equipment. Even the most dedicated Hygiene Team will struggle to validate their cleans if they are working with inaccurate information.

              The video below offers a demonstration of the key differences between a conventional ATP test and A3 technology:

              Why is A3 technology especially suited to seafood and fish processing?

              The dominant adenylates in seafood and fish

              The degradation of ATP-related compounds is more-or-less predictable after death. ATP also degrades to ADP and AMP when exposed to heat, acids, alkalis, and enzymes.  Across all species, raw fish contains high amounts of ADP. It is also worth noting that shellfish, including shrimp, oysters, scallops, and abalone, contain large amounts of AMP. This is also true of dried and canned fish.

              Consequently, seafood and fish processing sites need to ensure their Hygiene Monitoring is capable of detecting adenosine molecules in all three forms.

              Otherwise, to use the example of raw fish, a surface or piece of equipment could still be contaminated, but because a conventional ATP test is unable to detect ADP, it will generate a pass result and leave your Hygiene Team with a false sense of confidence.

              In a peer-reviewed article published by the Kikkoman Biochemifa Company in 2020, the swabbing efficiency of an A3 system was tested against three standard ATP tests. Measurements were repeated three times and were carried out across a 10cm x 10cm stainless steel surface.

              When testing raw chicken, which just like raw fish, sees ATP quickly degrade to ADP, the A3 test result was 15,872 RLU. In comparison, the results of the three ATP tests sat within the range of 20 to 173 RLU.

              When testing beer, which just like shellfish, along with dried and canned fish, sees ATP quickly degrade to AMP, the A3 test result was 10,777. In comparison, the results of the three ATP tests sat withing the range of 0 to 200 RLU.

              Even when detecting yoghurt, which has high levels of ATP, the A3 system still came out as the more sensitive test.

              In May 2018, Volume 81, Issue 5 of the Journal of Food Protection published data relating to another series of comparative tests. As you can see, these results highlight the difference between a conventional ATP test and the more accurate A3 technology when applied to fish and seafood.

              The relationship between ATP and salt

              Many fish processing sites have dedicated salting areas, with large amounts of salt covering equipment and machines. Although the cleaning and sanitisation process will remove visual signs of this residue, any remaining sodium chloride could result in false negative readings from conventional ATP tests. In fact, a recent study at a number of salt-curing cod factories suggests ATP readings in salted areas may be significantly underreported.

              So, why does this happen?

              Standard ATP tests often display a reading of 0 after swabbing, with operatives making the understandable assumption that a reading of 0 always means a surface is clean. However, a reading of 0 can also mean a swab is faulty, has been exposed to high concentration of chemical detergent, has been used incorrectly, or contains a faulty enzyme. In the case of seafood and fish processing sites, a reading of 0 could also mean the swab has been compromised by salt/sodium chloride.

              A3 technology is also impacted by a high salt concentration. However, unlike conventional ATP tests, the A3 system always produces a reading (normally between 1-8), even if it is extremely low. It will only produce a reading of 0 if it is alerting your operatives to a potential fault that requires further investigation. In the case of seafood and fish processing sites, a reading of 0 will inform your team of the possibility that the test has been compromised by high levels of salt/sodium chloride.

              The nature of the food residues being tested

              A report from The Norwegian Institute of Food, Fishery and Aquaculture Research revealed that output from conventional ATP testing is impacted by the nature of the food residues being detected. When applying the same critical limit to an entire fish processing plant, standard ATP tests indicated that hygiene levels in the slaughter house were considerably worse than hygiene levels in the filleting department. However, bacterial results revealed very little difference between the two zones. The reason behind this discrepancy is uncertain, but one possible explanation is the presence of blood in the slaughter house – a substance that typically gives high readings of ATP. In comparison, other soils such as muscle and fat were present in the filleting department – substances that typically result in lower ATP bioluminescence.

              These findings suggest conventional ATP tests will generate different results depending on the organic residue detected. This is supported by the fact that ATP tests didn’t detect a high RLU reading in raw fish, but once the fish had undergone a heat treatment, a much higher RLU reading was recorded.

              As previously mentioned, heat processes typically degrade ATP, so the ATP levels couldn’t have increased between the first and second round of testing. Instead, it is more likely that the standard ATP tests underestimated the levels of ATP because they were exposed to the fat-rich, raw fish. They were only able to detect the ATP molecules once the nature of the food residue had changed.

              Handwashing in the fish processing industry

              Handwashing checks are especially important when it comes to seafood and fish processing, with many sites favouring clean, bare hands over food contact approved gloves. This is another area where A3 technology can be put to use, as this system can identify operatives who are not ready to touch a production line. In the long term, it can also help sites to establish the best approach to handwashing – assessing the time, technique, and cleaning products.

              An educational resource published by the Kikkoman Biochemifa Company shared a Case Study of a sushi store and plant. The organisation had the target of “firmly implementing handwashing” and needed a method that allowed them to find out if their efforts had been successful.

              With the A3 system capable of providing results in around 10 seconds, the site was able to carry out on-the-spot checks, sharing immediate improvement guidance with operatives who failed the tests.

              In comparison, the site’s previous method (using bacteriological screening with a culture test) took several days to generate results. this meant unclean hands were working on an active production line for days at a time.

              A3 technology and allergen testing

              In the UK, there are 14 major allergens that legally need to be listed on a label or provided information. This list features: fish, molluscs, and crustaceans.

              Although the A3 system does not test for specific allergens and should not be relied upon for this, it can support you with the process of detecting allergens and potentially reduce your allergen swabbing requirements. This is because if a surface is free from organic residue, it follows that there isn’t any residue left to contaminate a non-allergen product. Essentially, the more accurate your hygiene monitoring, the more likely it is that your allergen tests will go smoothly. This is something the Klipspringer team can help you to validate.

              Here at Klipspringer, we recently published a Case Study with McCain Foods. This study explores the impact of the A3 system on McCain’s Scarborough site. One of the key takeaways from the study is that during a six-to-eight-month trial, the Scarborough site found that if a surface passed an A3 test it would go on to pass a gluten swab and then an ELISA test. During this period, McCain Foods didn’t have a single allergen fail following an A3 swab pass.

              A3 technology and Histamine detection

              In order to establish a complete picture of hygiene monitoring, it’s important that A3 technology operates alongside allergen and histamine testing. High levels of histamine can cause scombroid poisoning in humans, with symptoms including nausea, vomiting, hypotension, and heart palpitations. Good quality fish will typically have histamine levels below 10ppm, but depending on the species of fish and the country it is being processed in, histamine levels will usually sit between 50 and 200pm.

              So what is histamine?

              After a fish is harvested, the bacterial growth results in a increase of histidine decarboxylase. This enzyme decarboxylates (a chemical reaction where a carboxyl group is removed and carbon dioxide is released) the amino acid L-histidine. This results in the production of a heterocyclic primary amine: histamine.

              If you have any questions relating to your Histamine requirements or would like to source testing swabs for your site, you are welcome to contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com.  

              How do I roll out the A3 system?

              The first thing to note is that you won’t have to navigate this process alone. Here at Klipspringer, we provide ongoing support for the implementation of A3 technology. Working closely with a team of micro-biologists, we will help you to establish benchmarks, create validation documents to share with your auditors, and train up your operatives.

              We will also help you to get set up on the Lumitester App. Capable of data analysis, the Lumitester App can be used to store the data gathered through your A3 testing – automatically turning inspection pass rates into graphs, and recording every test alongside the date it took place and the operative responsible. Once you have this data, there is the option of downloading it onto Microsoft Excel. Alternatively, if you would like to access the data at any time from anywhere in the world, you also have the option of storing it in the cloud.

               

              • Upload results to the cloud via Bluetooth and PC connection
              • Set test points and benchmark values
              • Display time-series data for each test
              • Track overall inspection scores, with graphs
              • Access results 24/7 – from any device, anywhere.

              So that brings us to the end of our guide to Hygiene Monitoring within the seafood, fish, and fish processing industry. We hope this article has highlighted the importance of accurate hygiene monitoring within this sector and has outlined the risks associated with conventional ATP tests.

              If you would like any further guidance, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. Our in-house A3 expert Radek Tameczka will also be available to provide support and relevant resources. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a consultation

              If you would like further guidance relating to Hygiene Monitoring, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                Chemical Management

                Chemical Management: Using and Storing Cleaning Chemicals at Your Site

                Issue 9 of the Global Food Safety Standard from BRCGS references non-food chemical management several times. An important example of this is Clause 4.9.1.1, a section that outlines BRCGS expectations surrounding the storage and handling of chemicals.

                “Processes shall be in place to manage the use, storage and handling of non-food chemicals to prevent chemical contamination. These shall include, at a minimum:

                • an approved list of chemicals for purchase
                • availability of material safety data sheets and specifications
                • confirmation of suitability for use in a food-processing environment
                • avoidance of strongly scented products
                • the labelling and/or identification of chemicals at all times

                • a designated storage area (separate from chemicals used as raw materials in products), access restricted to authorised personnel
                • use by trained personnel only
                • procedures to manage any spills
                • procedures for the safe, legal disposal or return of obsolete or out-of-date chemicals and empty chemical containers”

                To help you secure compliance in this area, we have put together a comprehensive guide to the management of the cleaning chemicals at your site. From lining up the correct documentation to finding the best PPE, it will help you to enhance your current process – identifying both the things you are doing right and the areas where changes need to be made.

                #1 Establish a chemical inventory

                Create an inventory of the cleaning chemicals being used at your site. List the quantities you work with, the area they are being stored in, the operatives trained to handle them, the processes they are used for, and the associated risks of each chemical. You should also include the efficacy of the chemicals, along with any tests they have passed. Once you have completed your inventory, you will need to produce a COSHH assessment that details the necessary controls to keep your operatives safe. This could be anything from protective clothing to the temperature at which the chemicals need to be stored.

                #2 Consider your chemical supplier

                When selecting a chemical supplier, your decision should be based on the overall level of service you receive.

                Paying a little extra to work with a specialist supplier should grant you access to additional services such as expert advice and training resources. Some suppliers even offer auditing, visiting your site to check that your cleans are safe and effective. The right supplier will also stay abreast of changes in legislation, redeveloping their formulae to ensure your business remains compliant. This should come in handy when it comes to adhering to Clause 4.9.1.1, specifically the expectation that sites will maintain “procedures for the safe, legal disposal or return of obsolete or out-of-date chemicals and empty chemical containers.” When using a reputable chemical supplier, you will find that the return of chemicals and containers is part of the service. This will not only leave you with one less task to manage, but will also help you to secure that all-important audit compliance.

                The final step is to coordinate with your customers, as a lot of the major supermarkets and retailers will have rules of their own in terms of which cleaning chemicals can and cannot not be used. This will include the efficacy of the chemicals, along with any tests they have passed. For example, a biocidal chemical will need to pass an EN1276 to be used in a food processing site. There are also restrictions surrounding ‘strongly scented products’, as they can easily taint food items. Such chemicals are warned against in Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard.

                #3 Safely store your cleaning chemicals

                When cleaning chemicals are first delivered to your factory, they will typically arrive in kegs/barrels or an IBC (intermediate bulk container). They may also be deposited directly into large external holding tanks that are already on site. The chemicals will then be supplied around your site via a ring main, diluted with chemical dosing units. Alternatively, they will be used in mechanical or hand-operated spray units.

                During this process, your focus should be on the secure storage of the chemicals. If your site uses kegs or barrels, acid and alkali products must be adequate segregated, ideally in separate locations. This is incredibly important, as if the chemicals were allowed to mix, this could lead to serious health and safety hazards, such as chlorine gas. Kegs and barrels should also be held on bunded pallets to reduce the risk of chemicals leaking into the environment and becoming a serious hazard.

                If your site uses IBC and holding tanks, they will need to be locked off, only accessible to trained staff with authorisation. You should also pay attention to how effectively the dosing units are locked off when they are not in use. If the dosing points are in a high traffic area where there is a risk of damage to your site’s units and pipework, you need to ensure there is adequate guarding around them. Click here to read our guide to establishing a successful Lock Out Tag Out Program at your site.

                Finally, you need to ensure any neat or diluted cleaning chemicals are clearly identified – remembering to identify both the chemical and the dilution. Tuffx Tags can be used for this task, as they are extremely durable and come in eight different colours. IndeliMarking could also be of use, creating a lasting impression on equipment such as your Trigger Sprays.

                #4 Educate your operatives

                Training is one of the simplest ways to protect your business. Every site should have designated operatives who have the training and experience to handle cleaning chemicals, with these chemicals safely locked away, only to be accessed by a few trusted individuals. This isn’t an area that can be overlooked, as Chemical Handling is an official health and safety requirement for any operatives tasked with this responsibility.

                You will then need to educate your entire team on safe and effective chemical management. Even the operatives who aren’t required to work directly with chemicals should be involved, as they will need to understand the importance of deferring to someone with the right training if they are ever faced with a restricted chemical.

                Visual Management and Safety Signs will also play an important role, acting as constant reminders of the controls in place. They will also help you to connect with agency staff who may only be on site for a couple of days, along with operatives who do not have English as their first language.

                Auditors and customers alike will expect to see evidence of your commitment to safeguarding your operatives, so remember to keep a record of all your training procedures, as well as a documented list of command and up-to-date Cleaning Instruction Cards.

                #5 Evaluate your PPE

                The next step is to ensure the Specialist PPE at your site is chemical resistant, designed to withstand the most demanding factory environments. This equipment should include washdown and chemical garments, along with protective eye wear, footwear, and gloves. It is essential that you carry out a visual inspection of your PPE every time it is worn, completing an integrity check to ensure it is safe to use and doesn’t need to be replaced. Chemicals can find their way through the tiniest of gaps and have the potential to cause a lot of damage when they do, so you need to encourage your operatives to raise any concerns immediately. You should also pay close attention to the treads of the boots being worn, as the average Hygiene Team will be climbing onto ladders and equipment, so will be put at risk of trips and falls by worn treads or chemical burns caused by tears and holes.

                Your PPE will need to be kept clean, so make sure you speak to your supplier about the best way to do this. After all, incorrectly cleaning and drying your PPE could make it less effective or shorten its lifespan. Finally, your PPE will need its own designated storage zone. This will help to prevent cross contamination and will make it easier for your operatives to find the equipment they need.

                #6 Prepare for spills and accidents

                Certain cleaning chemicals cause burns and respiratory problems if they are handled incorrectly. They also represent a cross contamination risk if their concentration is too high. This makes your approach to handling spills and accidents absolutely crucial.

                When dealing with the former, you will need a Hazardous Materials Incident Kit, containing essential equipment such as spill tape, a chemical pad, and chemical resistant gloves. It is also interesting to note that although allergens are technically food items, they are actually classed as chemicals, so your Hygiene Team will also benefit from a dedicated Allergen Spill Kit.

                If your site is at risk of a more significant chemical spill, you may need a larger kit to deal with this requirement. One option is a Shoulder Pack with an absorption capacity of 45 litres. Alternatively, you could use a Wheeled Containment and Absorption Kit with an absorption capacity of 250 litres.  

                Last but not least, when it comes to handling accidents, you will need a British Standards First Aid Kit, featuring sterile wipes, bandages and dressings. An eye wash station and burns kit will also help to keep your operatives safe. 


                That brings us to the end of our guide to using and storing cleaning chemicals at your site. We hope that it has acted as a helpful reminder of the points you need to cover in order to safeguard your operatives and customers, along with the future of your factory. 

                Here at Klipspringer, we supply the Spill Kits, First Aid Kits, PPE, and Safety Signs mentioned in this article. We also have over twenty years of experience in supporting food and beverage production sites. If you would like any help with chemical management solutions, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                If you would like further guidance relating to the solutions mentioned in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                  Metal Detectable

                  Metal Detectable vs. Non-Metal Detectable Equipment: An honest comparison

                  Breaking down the pros and cons of metal detectable and non-metal detectable equipment for use in food production. 

                  When it comes to sourcing the right equipment for your site, there are a lot of important decisions to be made. What is the best colour coding policy? What is the most hygienic storage solution? Will the roll out require any additional training? But, out of all the questions to answer, one of the most common has to be: Does my site need metal detectable or non-metal detectable equipment?

                  The following article hopes to provide an answer, covering the benefits and limitations of both metal detectable equipment and an alternate approach: prevention before detection. It also aims to put right the common misconception that a standard metal detector will always pick up small metal detectable parts and brush bristles.

                  First and foremost, we want to be upfront and say that, at Klipspringer, we supply both metal detectable and non-metal detectable equipment, and hold these in stock for same-day despatch to our 4000+ food industry customers. Although this article will provide plenty of guidance, it is important that you assess the risks and food safety needs of your site processes, along with your audit standard stipulations, when deciding which design type is right for you.

                  It’s also important that we are clear in our definition of metal detectable utensils, with examples including: brushes, scrapers, spatulas, buckets, and shovels.

                  You may have noticed that metal detectable pens are not included in this list, as they fall into a different category and should be treated as such. The benefits and limitations explored in this article are not applicable to metal detectable pens, so to learn more about their role in the food production industry, simply follow the button below.

                  Discover the benefits of Metal Detectable Pens

                  Why do sites consider Metal Detectable Equipment?

                  Working with food and beverage production sites for over twenty years, we have noticed that factories typically turn to metal detectable equipment in response to a surge in customer complaints or a factory closeout following a major non-conformance.

                  Often the order will come from the top down, with senior management teams perceiving a high risk of foreign body contamination and deciding that the solution is metal detectable utensils.

                  Another fairly obvious factor is whether or not a factory carries out metal detection in the first place. After all, there would be little point in using metal detectable equipment without a functioning metal detector on site. Frequently, businesses that have newly invested in a metal detector will also purchase metal detectable equipment, believing the two work in tandem.

                  All of these motivations are entirely understandable, with the term ‘metal detectable’ providing a certain level of reassurance. In fact, it is a common misconception that metal detectable equipment will always be detected. Unfortunately, this belief is one of the most common reasons for sites to consider metal detectable equipment, resulting in a culture of complacency that needs to be addressed.

                  What are the pros and cons of Metal Detectable Equipment?

                  If you have been faced with a serious complaint or non-conformity, switching to metal detectable equipment is often a quick and easy way to display a commitment to reducing the risk of foreign body contamination. As mentioned above, there is a concern that this will be taken too far, with the equipment viewed as a fail safe solution. However, if the metal detection process is properly understood and risks are managed elsewhere, it is possible that metal detectable equipment will meet the requirements of your site.

                  As you would imagine, metal detectable equipment has a high content of metal. This makes it more brittle and likely to snap, splinter, or break. This also means that metal detectable brushes are only available with stiff bristles that aren’t as strong as the standard alternative. Whilst this may be a disadvantage in a bakery, where dry flour needs to be swept away with a soft bristle, it could be that the processes at your site are suited to a stiff bristle that needs to be strong enough to lift a stubborn residue, but not as strong as a regular stiff bristled brush.

                  One possible drawback of metal detectable equipment is its relationship with colour coding, as it tends to only be available in four colours: blue, red, yellow, and green. When compared to the eleven possible colours of our non-metal detectable equipment, this could be viewed as a limitation. However, most sites only see a need for their food contact equipment to be metal detectable. As you will know, standard colour coding policies usually assign blue to this application anyway, which means the blue metal detectable equipment should fit right in.

                  One issue that may be harder to resolve is the fact that your metal detector is unlikely to detect your metal detectable equipment. Imagine a bristle clump from a metal detectable brush or a strand of plastic from a metal detectable scraper. If they make their way into your product, it would be understandable for you to expect them to be picked up by your detector.

                  However, in order to identify an item this small, your detector would have to be adjusted to an incredibly sensitive setting. The problem with this is that all products produce a ‘background signal’, especially wet products such as dairy and ready meals. If your detector is too sensitive, it will be triggered by this ‘background signal’, regardless of whether or not there is a small metal detectable item hiding in the product. Batch after batch would be falsely rejected, resulting in a significant loss of time and money.

                  Finally, metal detectable equipment can lead to a culture of complacency. If your operatives fail to understand how unlikely it is for your metal detector to identify small metal detectable items, it is possible that they will take risks they would otherwise avoid.

                  Say your team carries out an equipment audit and someone notices a utensil is particularly worn or the bristles on a brush are coming loose. If they understand that there is no way for a small broken part or a singular bristle clump to be detected, they will likely raise this issue and source a replacement.

                  However, if they are reassured by the term ‘metal detectable’ and falsely believe that an infallible safety net is in place, your operative may try to extend the lifespan of the equipment, unaware of the risks posed by doing so.

                  Even if you do manage to get your core team on board, you will also have to convey this information to agency staff who may only be on site for a couple of days at a time.

                  What are the pros and cons of 'Prevention Before Detection'?

                  Prevention before detection shifts the focus away from metal detection and towards the goal of preventing foreign bodies from entering your product in the first place. Standard hygiene and production equipment meets this requirement, as it is much more durable than metal detectable equipment – less likely to snap, splinter, or break.

                  It is also worth noting that there are more designs available within this range. For example, the brushware offers a choice of extra soft, soft/medium, medium/stiff, extra stiff, and combination bristles. This will make it easier for you to find the right utensil for each application, something that will not only help your team and speed up your operation, but will also reduce the risk of equipment breaking from incorrect use.

                  Unlike metal detectable equipment, prevention before detection emphasises the role and responsibility of the individual operative. It removes the risk of your workers placing all their trust in just one part of the production process. Instead, foreign body contamination will need to be a priority throughout. Whether your operatives are putting away their tools at the end of a production run, searching for the right utensil to clean out a machine, or carrying out a thorough inspection of the equipment on site, it’s important that they understand the ‘why’ behind what they are doing and feel responsible for the safety of the finished product.

                  The only real downside of prevention before detection is that it involves more thought and effort than the impulse purchase of metal detectable equipment. It requires you to look at all aspects of your operation, identifying any areas where there is a risk of foreign body contamination. Whilst this could be viewed as a negative, it is likely to benefit your site in the long term, as you will be working towards an effective approach to safeguarding against foreign bodies.

                  Key Points to Consider

                  Metal Detectable Equipment:

                  • Quick way to display a commitment to reducing the risk of foreign body contamination
                  • High metal content, more likely to snap, splinter and break
                  • Brushware only available with stiff bristles
                  • Leads to a culture of complacency
                  • Small parts and bristles won't be detected
                  • Adjusting the sensitivity of your metal detector could result in false rejections
                  • Limited colour coding options
                  • Shorter lifespan than standard equipment

                  Non-Metal Detectable Equipment:

                  • Strong and durable
                  • Brushware available with four different bristle options
                  • Doesn't provide a false sense of security
                  • Shifts the focus to 'prevention before detection'
                  • Available in 11 different colours to suit your colour coding policy
                  • Longer lifespan than metal detectable equipment
                  • 'Prevention before detection' requires you to evaluate all aspects of your operation

                  Now that we’ve worked through the pros and cons of metal detectable and non-metal detectable equipment, it is all about making the best decision for you and your factory. Even if you are dealing with a customer complaint or a point of non-conformance, the most important thing is to remain calm, acting from a place of confidence rather than panic.

                  You can achieve this by involving your Hygiene, Technical, and Production Managers in any key decisions, especially those surrounding the purchase of new equipment. Another important step is to reach out to your equipment provider for support, as they will be able to help you find the right utensil for each application. If you share key information about your processes, they will also be able to advise you on whether metal detectable equipment is a suitable choice for your site.

                  As the leading provider of food safety compliance, we would be happy to help you with this matter and can be contacted on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                  If you would like further guidance relating to your quality management system, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                    HRC24: Klipspringer Announce Attendance at Leading UK Hospitality Show

                    What is the HRC24 event?

                    Food, Drink and Hospitality Week will be taking place this March and is set to attract over 27,000 industry leaders. The week-long event is a brilliant opportunity for you to network, get inspired, and discover new products and innovations. 

                    A highlight of the week is sure to be HRC 2024. It is not to be missed – affording you access to more than 100 talks, demos, and competitions, along with 1,500 food, drink, and hospitality suppliers. Across the three days of product discovery, you can also explore over 10,000 products, and we are pleased to announce that four Klipspringer innovations will be making up this number. Find our team at Stand H2258.

                    When and where is HRC24, and how much does it cost to attend?

                    Date

                    25th – 27th March 2024 (Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday)

                    Time

                    • Monday: 10:00 – 17:00
                    • Tuesday: 10:00 – 17:00
                    • Wednesday: 10:00 – 16:00

                    Location

                    ExCeL London, One Western Gateway, Royal Victoria Dock, London, E16 1XL

                    Ticket Prices

                    Your free trade pass grants you access to all of the events taking place during Food, Drink & Hospitality Week.

                    What will Klipspringer be bringing to the HRC24 event?

                    As the leading provider of food safety compliance, we will be showcasing a range of products at this year’s HRC event, including our Shadow Board storage solutions and the LazaPort Mono, an in-house system for verifying your thermometers and probes.

                    The Klipspringer team will also be on hand to answer questions about our Food Oil Monitor, an innovative product that has helped sites to reduce oil usage by up to 52%, without compromising on quality or consistency. You can find us at Stand H2258 to discover more about our recent Case Studies with Whitbread and Five Guys.

                    Finally, we will be highlighting TRAKKD, our cloud-based quality management system. With more and more sites making the switch from paper to digital checklists, we anticipate many interesting conversations surrounding sustainability, accuracy, and audit compliance.

                    We can't wait to connect with you!

                    HRC24 is an important event in the Klipspringer calendar, so we want to make sure as many team members as possible are on hand to answer your questions and tell you more about the products on display. With this in mind, members of our Business Development, Sales and Marketing, Commercial, and Management Teams will be in attendance across the three days. If you would like to connect, our stand number is: H2258.

                    Monday 25th March

                    • Wes, Business Development
                    • Simone, Business Development
                    • Pete, Commercial Director

                    Tuesday 26th March

                    • Wes, Business Development
                    • Hadley, Commercial Team
                    • Pete, Commercial Director

                    Wednesday 27th March

                    • Wes, Business Development
                    • Sam, Sales & Marketing Director
                    • Murray, Managing Director

                    If you have any questions for us ahead of the event, you are welcome to contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com.  


                    Mental Health: Supporting Your Team Within The Food Production Industry

                    In this article, we outline a strategy for promoting a positive mental health culture at your site and explore the many benefits of making this goal a top priority.

                    According to government statistics, 35.2 million working days were lost in Britain between 2023 and 2024, with 17.1 million of those days attributed to stress, depression, or anxiety. On average, each person suffering took around 19.6 days off to cope with their mental health.

                    As well as being hugely difficult for the individuals struggling with their wellbeing, you can see how these statistics point to a serious problem for companies trying to maintain a happy and productive workforce. They also show that caring about your workers isn’t just the right thing to do, but also the best way to safeguard the success of your business.

                    With this in mind, we have created a guide to effectively supporting operatives within the world of food and beverage production. We hope that it can act as a useful resource when convincing all levels of your operation to join in your push for a positive and progressive approach to mental health.

                    #1 What motivates your operatives?

                    The first step is to engage with your operatives on an individual basis, taking the time to find out what motivates them and why they chose the role they are in. Say you are talking to a Hygiene Manager. It’s important to work out why they chose a position that often involves minimal social contact. If this is something they like about the role, perhaps you could support them on the occasions when they do need to step outside their comfort zone. Alternatively, if they enjoy socialising and struggle with a sense of being shut off, you can make sure they have plenty of opportunity to collaborate with other departments, inviting your Hygiene Manager to team meetings or even taking simple steps such as looping them into relevant email chains.

                    If you are working at a large site with a high number of operatives, sending out a company wide survey is an effective way to speed up this process. Through this survey, you can find out whether or not your team is satisfied with their work life and identify any areas where changes need to be made. If your survey has a section dedicated to mental health and wellbeing, you should give your workers the option of remaining anonymous, as this will increase the likelihood of you receiving honest feedback.

                    A survey could also provide you with a chance to find out if your site’s culture is clearly understood. Here at Klipspringer, our core values are: care, competence, and focus. If your site doesn’t already have its own core values established, now is the perfect time to take this step. This will encourage your operatives to work towards a collective goal. Depending on the values you choose, it could also help your team to feel valued, respected, and part of something important.

                    #2 Is there an issue with isolation at your site?

                    Isolation can increase the risk of depression, anxiety, and cognitive decline. It is also a common issue within the food production industry, with many operatives working unsociable hours and under conditions that make it difficult to form connections.

                    To address this issue, you need to ensure everyone at your site knows who to turn to if a problem arises, if they are unhappy with their working conditions, or if they are feeling disconnected from wider factory decisions. These interactions shouldn’t just be about the negatives though, you should also encourage workers to voice their ideas and ambitions – solving problems and sharing their daily wins.

                    Another important step is to find time for your operatives to attend networking events, industry forums, or even online webinars that connect individuals working in a similar role. Take your Hygiene Manager, for example. Typically working nights and to the pressure of tight deadlines, you can imagine how validating it would be for them to connect with someone else in this position – pooling their industry experience to resolve common issues.

                    #3 Are there any tensions that need to be resolved?

                    The next step is to identify potential sources of stress for your operatives. One popular example is the tension between Hygiene and Production teams. All too often, hygiene operatives will grow frustrated with the state an area is left in when production has finished for the day, with equipment put back in the wrong place and on-the-spot cleans falling to the wayside. Equally, production operatives will often feel let down if a hygiene window overruns or the length of this window is extended over time.

                    Instead of allowing situations like these to spiral out of control, it’s important that you turn conflict into collaboration – bringing together departments and nurturing a unified workforce. One way to do this is to involve senior members of each department in important decisions from the very beginning. You should welcome their feedback on matters such as the length of the hygiene window, the decision to invest in new equipment, and the launch of a new product.

                    If you are a department lead yourself, you should consider attending other team meetings, embracing the chance to learn more about the goals and challenges of your colleagues. You could also float the idea of each department sharing a company-wide update at the end of every week/month. This update will shine a light on the work being done across your site, helping your operatives to understand the importance of each team.

                    #4 Are your operatives being listened to?

                    It will be almost impossible for you to ascertain the mental wellbeing of your team without an open line of communication. Operatives at your site are unlikely to feel valued and motivated if their input never seems to be acted upon or, at the very least, seriously considered. This is where you need to consider the stakeholders in your factory and the overall goals of your business.

                    Understandably, a lot of decisions made at a senior level will relate to finance and business development. Therefore, it is important that the individuals impacted by these decisions, such as Technical, Production, and Hygiene Managers, have the training they need to communicate effectively. Here, you should encourage collaboration between departments.

                    You could even arrange a training session with someone from your financial department. In this session, they could run through the basics of putting together a proposal or identifying key points when requesting the role out of a new instrument or piece of equipment.

                    You should also take time to consider team members who don’t have English as their first language, as it’s important that they are not left out of your efforts to nurture a collaborative and communicative workforce. One solution is to make your communications as simple, accessible, and visual as possible.

                    In a recent webinar for the Food Safety Innovation Conference, Denis Treacy shared an anecdote where he put up drawings of a site on all the walls, then asked operatives in each team to write their questions, concerns, and ideas. This activity is suitable for everyone, especially if you have a team leader on hand to note down verbal comments as well as written ones.

                    Of course activities like this won’t solve any problems your operatives are facing at home or help them to deal with serious mental health concerns. However, this could be a great way to ensure honest and open conversations are a familiar part of your operation. It could also be the start of motivating your operatives, giving them a sense of purpose and a reason to look forward to coming into work. 

                    #5 Do you workers feel secure in their role?

                    Depending on the kind of site you work at, automation may feel like a far off prospect. Alternatively, it may be a subject that you discuss on a regular basis. Either way, it is likely that your team will have heard about its future in the food production industry, and if this is the case, they could be concerned about their job security.

                    Research has shown that individuals who are concerned about the reliability of their employment are more likely to struggle with symptoms of anxiety and depression. The answer is the education of your workforce – training your operatives to understand the ways in which automation could make their working lives easier, solving problems as opposed to stealing their jobs.

                    This could even be an opportunity for you to inspire your team, capturing the imagination of operatives who were previously hard to motivate. As with any role out of new technology or equipment, it is important to appoint ‘cheerleaders’ in every department, individuals who have a passion for the advancement and are happy to share this passion with the people around them.

                    By giving these individuals the opportunity to attend industry events, training sessions, or to meet with prospective suppliers, you will not only be securing their loyalty and dedication, but will also be giving them purpose and a newfound sense of confidence.

                    #6 Is respect an important part of your company's culture?

                    Dignity and respect are important words to use when discussing matters of mental health. As with any workplace, it’s important that your operatives feel valued and protected. With this in mind, you should evaluate the equipment you are asking your teams to use. Do they have the correct PPE to keep them safe from extreme temperatures, ongoing discomfort, and harmful chemicals? Are they using utensils that are suited to the task at hand, ergonomically designed to reduce the risk of strain or injury? Could their working lives be made easier with the introduction of new and more effective equipment? Instead of cutting corners, it’s important that the safety and comfort of your team is prioritised.


                    So there you have it, a guide to prioritising the mental health of your operatives. We hope that you have come away with some actionable steps for nurturing a positive culture at your site. We also hope that this guide has highlighted the connection between positivity and productivity, with a happy workforce promising increased levels of efficiency, quality, and employee retention.

                    If you would like additional support as you carry out these steps or would like to share your experience of working in the world of food and beverage production, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                    If you would like further guidance or support, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                      SegriScreen

                      SegriScreens: Everything You Need to Know About Cleaning and Maintenance

                      With so many complex and technical processes within the world of food and beverage production, it is common for sites to expect a complicated answer to questions relating to the roll out or maintenance of equipment.

                      This can sometimes happen with SegriScreens, with the occasional site worrying about the best cleaning methods and surprised to learn just how simple it is to keep a SegriScreen in prime condition.

                      If you or anyone at your factory has questions surrounding the cleaning and maintenance of SegriScreens, this guide will tell you everything you need to know. From educating your Hygiene Team to evaluating your approach to storage, you will find all the key information listed below.

                      #1 Carry out regular cleans

                      When it comes to cleaning your SegriScreens, it’s important that you keep things simple. Every site is different, but no matter what, your hygiene team will need to hose down the SegriScreens after use, removing gross debris and making sure the screens are clean enough to pass a visual check. Frequency is key, so it’s important that these cleans are carried out on a regular basis. If a particularly messy spill or splatter occurs, your hygiene team may decide to carry out a deep clean. In this instance, they will have the option of dismantling the screens in just a few simple steps and this will allow them to reach between the metal brackets.

                      #2 Assess your approach to storage

                      The next step is to ensure your SegriScreens are stored correctly. Otherwise your hygiene team could be going to great lengths to clean the screens, only for them to be damaged and dirtied between production runs. Our SegriScreens have been designed to save you space, nesting together when they are not in use. Nesting will also offer a certain amount of protection, with the inner screens safely enclosed by the outer two. Once the screens have been nested, they need to be stored away from factory footfall. This will reduce the risk of operatives brushing against them or ingredients being spilled in their direction.

                      Although they need to be out of the way, your SegriScreens should also be easily accessible to your operatives. This will not only speed up the process of the screens being set up, but will also eliminate the risks posed by the screens being led through different areas of your factory – exposed to different environments, ingredients, and operatives.

                      #3 Check the hooks, bolts, brackets & wheels

                      Another important step is to check the fixing points on your SegriScreens. In order for your SegriScreen to be working effectively, a hook needs to be running through every eyelet, adjusted to the correct tension. The corner brackets also need to be nice and tight, holding the material of the screen in place and preventing it from flapping about. If your hygiene team notices any dirt or debris on these fixings, a small detail brush will help them to remove it without the hassle of dismantling the screen. If these areas aren’t already listed on your Cleaning Instruction Cards, now is the time to make this addition.

                      #4 Educate & inspire your operatives

                      As with any equipment, the lifespan of your SegriScreens will be impacted by the mindset of your operatives. Therefore, it is important that you consider the training and resources currently available at your site.

                      Does your team know what a correctly assembled, suitably clean SegriScreen looks like?

                      You can make sure they do with help from Visual Management tools, such as a board that features step-by-step instructions and images of the cleaning process. As mentioned above, Cleaning Instruction Cards will also play an important role, so make sure they are up to date and populated with lots of helpful pictures.

                      Another idea is to make individual operatives responsible for the care of your SegriScreens. Can you think of a team member who is particularly interested in this segregation solution? If not, this could be a great opportunity to motivate your workers – raising someone up to become the SegriScreen expert of their department.

                      Finally, you should highlight the ‘why?’ behind what you are asking your team to do. After all, SegriScreens can reduce downtime, making life easier for hygiene and production teams alike. They can also help to prevent cross contamination, something that is vital for allergen control and could literally be a matter of life and death.

                      #5 Follow up with regular inspections

                      Finally, you should carry out routine inspections of your SegriScreens to confirm they are in good working order and are being cleaned correctly. If you start to notice any wear and tear, you can take preventative action, carrying out a root cause analysis to work out who is damaging the screen and why they are being handled incorrectly. If something serious occurs and your SegriScreen is compromised, it is worth noting that the PVC screen material is sold separately and can be despatched to your site on the same day as purchase. If necessary, you can even arrange for a replacement of the metal frame and wheels.


                      That brings us to the end of our guide to cleaning and maintaining the SegriScreens at your factory. As you can see, it is a simple process that shouldn’t be overcomplicated. Using cleaning utensils that you are likely to already have on site, you can keep this segregation solution in good working order, ensuring it is an asset to your operation and a means of impressing any customers or inspectors. 

                      Here at Klipspringer, we supply SegriScreens to leading brands such as Morrisons, Cranswick, Bakkavor, Greencore, and Greggs. If you would like any help with introducing this solution to your site or would appreciate further guidance on caring for your screens, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                      If you would like further guidance relating to the solutions mentioned in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                        Product Guide

                        Klipspringer Celebrates the Launch of a New Product Guide

                        Here at Klipspringer, we take great pride in our Product Guide. After all, it is a valuable resource for our customers – helping you to order your favourite equipment, but also highlighting the arrival of new and innovative products.

                        With this in mind, we are starting 2024 with the launch of the Klipspringer Product Guide, V31. Featuring enhanced imagery, updated information, and a whole host of new products, this catalogue will make it even easier for you to explore our extensive range of equipment. It will have landed with customers by now, but if you would like to request a copy, you can call 01473 461800 or you can email sales@klipspringer.com. You can also click the button below to fill out a request form.

                        What should I expect from Klipspringer's Product Guide?

                        Our Product Guide is organised into nine distinct categories:

                        Within these categories, you will find a range of relevant products, with each item listed alongside an image and product code. Also listed are the size and capacity options, the colour coding choices, the materials used, and any other key features.

                        In addition to this, there are symbols used throughout the Product Guide to indicate properties such as a suitability for high heat environments or direct contact with food. Our best sellers are also made clear with the handy star symbol.

                        What's new in the Product Guide?

                        A number of new products have been added to this release. This could be a great opportunity for you to learn more about a product you were already aware of or to catch up with a launch you might have missed.

                        Below are eight of the new ranges featured in our 2024 Product Guide:

                        First, we highlighted the expansion of our range of certified, robust, food grade equipment. Designed with food factories in mind, our selection of Stainless Steel Utensils is stocked for next day delivery.

                        From buckets and measuring jugs to PPE dispensers and document holders, there are an impressive number of products for you to choose from.

                        Also expanding is our range of ergonomic, professional food knives. Stocked for same-day despatch, our selection of Production Knives can be broken down into three categories: Performance, Ergonomic, and Essential.

                        Made from Quality European Steel, these knives are available in up to six colours, so will fit right into your site’s colour coding policy.

                        Another new addition is our TRAKKD Digital HACCP System. This digital quality management system will help your site to secure audit compliance – integrating reliable hardware with accessible and versatile software.

                        With TRAKKD, you will be able to record accurate data, save time and money, increase visibility, and meet your sustainability targets.

                        Satisfy audit compliance and quality requirements with professional temperature mapping in the form of a Real-time Monitoring System.

                        Also capable of tracking factors such as humidity, energy, and door contact, the WatchmanOne system offers instant alarm notifications, no ongoing fees, automated reporting, and data security.

                        Euro Bins (also known as Tote Bins) are widely used across food production and food processing. They are invaluable when it comes to the storage, transport, and lifting of products.

                        Made from 2mm thick, 304 grade stainless steel, and with a reinforced 5mm base, our euro bins feature a distinctive diamond wheel pattern that allows for extra manoeuvrability and ease of steering.

                        As mentioned above the Klipspringer Product Guide is organised into nine categories. This is one more than our previous catalogue thanks to the arrival of our WashGuard Range.

                        Designed by hygiene teams for hygiene teams, this protective, chemical-resistant clothing offers high durability, a comfortable design, and enhanced safety features such as reflective strips and elasticated cuffs.

                        The A3 Meter is a quick and simple device for hygiene control and the detection of organic residue.

                        A3 technology provides faster, smarter, and more reliable hygiene monitoring. Unlike ATP tests, an A3 meter can detect adenosine molecules in all three forms: ATP, AMP and ADP. This means it provides accurate readings even after common processes such as fermentation, heating and cleaning.

                        Finally, we announced the launch of two new online tools: The Audit Portal and The Calibration Portal. With the help of these free resources, you will be able to download all of your product and calibration certificates at the click of a button.

                        This will make it so much easier for you to prepare for your upcoming audits and to ensure you have the documentation you need to secure compliance.

                        To request your free copy of the Klipspringer Product Guide, simply share your details below…


                          Dry Cleaning

                          Dry Cleaning in Food Factories: Everything You Need to Know

                          When it comes to running a successful factory, implementing and maintaining an effective cleaning policy has to be one of the most important things that you can do. This policy needs to reflect the specific needs of your site, factoring in the materials you handle, the space you are working in, and the risk levels associated with your ingredients.

                          One additional consideration will be whether your site relies on a wet or dry cleaning process. If your hygiene team carries out a dry clean, you will need to think carefully about the cleaning equipment at your site, your approach to validation, and the best way to engage your site staff.

                          To help you on your way, we have put together a comprehensive guide to dry cleaning. It covers the questions listed below and you are welcome to use the links to skip straight to the section most relevant to your needs. Alternatively, you will find valuable takeaways throughout.

                          What are the basic principles of dry cleaning?

                          What equipment is essential to an effective dry clean?

                          What are the benefits of a dry cleaning method?

                          What are the common pain points of dry cleaning and how can I avoid them?

                          What are the basic principles of dry cleaning?

                          As the name suggests, dry cleaning is a cleaning process that doesn’t involve any water or moisture. Instead, air lines and dry equipment are used to prepare an area for production. Working from the top down, hygiene teams will agitate then remove any dirt or debris.

                          Unsurprisingly, sites that handle dry ingredients and produce dry products tend to be the sites that carry out dry cleans. After all, you can imagine the consequences of a flour mill or spice factory getting its product wet. This would not only pose a huge food safety risk, but would also have a significant impact on the taste, texture, and consistency of the product.

                          Dry cleans are typically used for low risk environments; however, every site is different and will have a unique process in place. Take a chocolate biscuit factory – its hygiene operatives are likely to carry out a dry clean because of the low risk status of biscuits. However, the use of chocolate increases the level of risk and will have to be factored into the cleaning process.

                          Here, you will often find sites carrying out a dry clean, but with a small number of wet products such as a damp cleaning cloths or food-safe disinfectant wipes. Although both these items are technically moist, many sites would still consider this a dry clean. After all, it is a far cry from a traditional wet clean where large amounts of water, foam, and cleaning chemicals are used to cover an entire area.

                          Sites that carry out dry cleans will have designated washdown areas in a separate part of the building. This is where cleaning utensils and production equipment will be taken so that stubborn residues can be power-washed away. However, built-in, extremely heavy, or electrical machines such as mixers, cutting machines, and dicers will need to be cleaned in situ. This task will require a selection of specialist equipment – suited to the specific demands of an effective dry clean.

                          What equipment is essential to an effective dry clean?

                          Without the use of powerful water hoses and strong cleaning chemicals, your hygiene team will have a lot of challenges to overcome when carrying out an effective dry clean. If you are concerned about health and safety, the current length of your hygiene window, or the issue of employee retention, now is the perfect time to conduct an equipment review.

                          It’s important to remember that for every problem, there is a product to provide a solution. From a 7mm bottle brush that can reach inside tight spaces to a stiff-bristled sweeper that will agitate the dirt on your factory floor, finding the right equipment will help you to raise standards, whilst making life easier for your hygiene operatives.

                          Machine and Utility Brushes

                          Machine and Utility brushes will help your operatives to clean awkward spots, with extra-long, thin brushes for long, narrow spaces, small detail brushes for removing extra stubborn residues, and high heat brushes to clean surfaces up to 250°C.

                          Hand Scrub Brushes

                          Thanks to their stiff bristles and comfortable grip, churn and hand scrubs are ideally suited to tougher applications, helping your operatives to lift stubborn or baked-on debris. At Klipspringer we offer a wide range of shapes and sizes.

                          Lobby and Dust Pans

                          Lobby and dust pans allow your operatives to clean up loose debris quickly and easily. A sophisticated design will be made from food contact approved material and will boast a raised lip to prevent the contents of the pan from spilling out.

                          Cleaning Cloths

                          This all-purpose cloth is suited to both wet and dry cleans. Manufactured from a blend of viscose and polyester, it has an open structure for effective particle collection and possesses an impressive absorption rate. Available in five colours to meet your segregation needs.

                          Microfibre Cloths

                          The microfibres in these cloths are positively charged. This attracts negatively charged particles such as dirt, bacteria, and grease. Instead of falling away from the cloth, dirt and debris will cling on, even without the use of a water solution or a cleaning chemical.

                          Disinfectant Wipes

                          As mentioned above, antibacterial, disinfectant wipes can sometimes contribute to a dry clean – introducing moisture to just a small area and tackling particularly stubborn residues or cleaning equipment that handles ingredients with a higher food safety risk.

                          Hygiene Sweepers

                          When it comes to brushing debris off your factory floor, your operatives will require a high quality hygiene sweeper. Light debris such as flour can be moved by a sweeper with extra soft bristles, whereas a stiff or combination brush will be needed for more intense agitation.

                          Tank Brushes

                          Our range of tank brushes has been made using water resistant filaments. This prevents them from being saturated by any liquids when they are cleaning vats, tanks, or any other vessel. The rounded design of these brushes is perfect for reaching hard-to-reach crevices.

                          Vacuum Cleaners

                          A suitable vacuum will meet high filtration standards, guaranteeing the filtration of a high percentage of the sucked material. It will also have custom attachments for specific applications, an automatic filter vibration option, and carbon fibre poles for high reach cleaning.

                          What are the benefits of a dry cleaning method?

                          • Dry cleaning can help to reduce factory downtime. Instead of waiting for a wet environment or piece of equipment to dry, you can reduce the hygiene window and get your production line back up and running as soon as possible.
                          • Dry cleaning is suited to electrical equipment. Unless your instrumentation has an IP67 or IP68 rating, and is therefore waterproof, it could be damaged by a wet clean. In contrast, a dry clean is ideal for electrical equipment, as it eliminates the risk of water damage.
                          • A dry clean could help you to meet your sustainability targets. Some sites view dry cleaning as an opportunity to preserve water and cleaning products. Instead of a foamy wash, dry cleans tend to be more targeted.
                          • Dry cleaning could result in the reduction of labour. Another benefit of a more targeted clean is the potential to cut down on the number of operatives working in an area at one time.
                          • A dry clean could help to improve standards of hygiene and safety at your site. Microorganisms tend to thrive in a wet environment. By eliminating the presence of moisture at your site, you will be making it harder for these microorganisms to reproduce.
                          • Dry cleaning could be the answer to resistant strains of bacteria. Some sites rotate their cleaning methods - cycling through different products and techniques to stop the bacteria developing a defence against the products it is being exposed to.

                          What are the common pain points of dry cleaning and how can I avoid them?

                          Lack of understanding

                          A recent Klipspringer Industry Forum revealed that one of the major pain points associated with dry cleaning is a lack of understanding from staff. Some operatives make the mistake of thinking there aren’t any micro risks to be concerned with in a low risk environment. This can result in inefficient and inconsistent cleans. To resolve this problem, it’s important that you arrange ongoing training and support any key messages with eye-catching Visual Management. You should also review your Cleaning Instruction Cards, making sure they are as detailed as possible with lots of photos.

                          Finding the right equipment

                          Another common issue is a lack of awareness in terms of the equipment available. Without the correct equipment, it will be impossible for your Hygiene Team to do their job. That is why you need to find suitable utensils for the hard-to-reach areas of your factory. Whether that’s underneath a production belt or behind the back of a machine, you will need durable yet flexible equipment that is the correct size and angled to fit the relevant space. Before making any decisions, why not consult your Hygiene Team? Find out what tasks are slowing them down and run through the possible solutions.

                          Validating the cleans

                          The process for validating a dry clean is the same as the process for validating a wet clean. Even so, this can be another pain point, with a lot of teams relying on visual checks rather than accurate testing. This poses a serious risk to audit compliance. The solution is A3 monitoring. A step-up from traditional ATP tests, an A3 meter can detect adenosine molecules in all three forms: ATP, ADP, and AMP. Unlike an ATP test it eliminates the risk of false negative readings and detects organic residue even after common factory processes such as blanching, heating, and even cleaning.


                          So there you have it, everything you need to know about dry cleaning in food factories. We hope that you now have a clear idea of the best equipment for the job and the most effective way to maintain a successful cleaning policy across your site. We also hope that the lengthy list of benefits helps you to convey the value of dry cleaning to your operatives – helping them to see that a dry clean isn’t the sign of a low stakes operation, but rather a necessary course of action for a site with specialist requirements.

                          If you would like to learn more about the cleaning equipment mentioned in this article, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                          If you would like further guidance relating to the cleaning equipment and brushes mentioned in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                            ATP and A3

                            Cleaning and Sanitisation in the Brewing Industry: ATP vs A3

                            Exploring the importance of effective Hygiene Monitoring within the brewing industry, plus an in depth explanation of A3 technology as an alternative to ATP testing.

                            When it comes to running a successful brewery, effective hygiene monitoring is absolutely essential. Failing to prioritise this aspect of your operation could compromise the quality, taste, and safety of your product.

                            The ability to accurately detect the presence of organic material is particularly important within a brewery, but unfortunately this is also an industry in which conventional ATP testing is likely to struggle. As a result, a number of breweries are now exploring the benefits of A3 technology.

                            With this in mind, we have created a guide to validating the cleaning and sanitisation of your brewery. In this article we will cover all of the areas listed below. There is helpful content in each section, but you can also use the links to skip to the subject most relevant to your site.

                            #1 Why is the cleaning and sanitisation of my brewery so important?

                            #2 How can I make sure my brewery is cleaned and sanitised correctly?

                            #3 What are the dangers of failing to detect all three adenosine molecules?

                            #4 Why is A3 technology especially suited to a brewery? 

                            #5 How do I carry out hygiene monitoring at my brewery?

                            #6 What are the key benefits of an A3 meter?

                            Why is the cleaning and sanitisation of my brewery so important?

                            You will already be familiar with at least some of the reasons for cleaning and sanitising your brewery, but we would recommend bringing them to the forefront of your mind. After all, being able to share the following incentives at a moment’s notice could prove invaluable when it comes to training your operatives, securing investment in new equipment, and sending the right message during upcoming audits.

                            1. Protecting the reputation of your brand

                            In an age of social media and online reviews, it is more important than ever to uphold the reputation of your business. Contrary to popular belief, the alcohol content of your product won’t necessarily eliminate harmful bacteria, so it is still possible for a contaminated beer to prove seriously harmful, if not fatal, to your customers. This could mean the end of your operation.

                            2. Securing quality and consistency

                            As you will know, yeast is a living organism that needs a very specific environment to thrive. Foreign body contamination can totally change this environment, so the taste of your product is at least partly reliant on how well your equipment was cleaned and sanitised before production. If the right hygiene operative was working that day, your finished product will be just as expected, but if a less enthusiastic operative was on site, you could be left with a sour beer that will lead people to question your processes.

                            3. Saving your site time and money 

                            At most factories there are targets and incentives related to spending. Although it might feel like a risk to warn your operatives against cutting corners to save time and money, a comprehensive clean isn’t going to cost you in the long run, it actually has the potential to save you a significant amount. Consider the expense of throwing away a contaminated batch, failing an audit, damaging your brand’s reputation, or replacing degraded equipment long before its suggested lifespan.

                            4. Securing audit compliance

                            Last but not least, prioritising the cleaning and sanitisation of your brewery will help you to secure audit compliance. Inspectors will expect to see evidence of your brewery working to the current specifications and standards. It should be clear that your operatives are aware of these targets and know exactly how to meet them. Hygiene is always going to play an important role in this, so you will need to consider everything from the quality of your cleaning equipment and the standard of your PPE to the clarity of your Cleaning Instruction Cards and the accuracy of your instrumentation.

                            How can I make sure my brewery is cleaned and sanitised correctly?

                            ATP testing is a traditional method for ascertaining how well a surface has been cleaned and whether or not any organic residue remains. This is because ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a molecule found in every living organism. However, times are changing and many breweries are now making the switch to A3 technology – viewing it as a more comprehensive and reliable approach to hygiene monitoring.

                            But why is this shift occurring?

                            ATP is an unstable molecule that degrades in certain processes – including fermentation. It degrades to ADP and AMP, becoming undetectable to a traditional ATP test. In contrast, an A3 meter is able to detect adenosine molecules in all three forms: ATP, ADP, and AMP.

                            The graph below shows the results of an A3 meter when compared to three ATP meters testing the same surface:

                            As you can see, there is a dramatic difference between the readings provided by the A3 system and the ATP meters. The ATP tests indicate a low level of organic material and suggest the surface isn’t in need of any further cleaning. Whereas, the A3 system indicates a much higher level of organic material and suggests the surface needs to be cleaned and sterilised until this residue is removed.

                            This shows that if you are currently using ATP testing at your brewery, there is every chance that your equipment and surfaces are passing tests they should in fact be failing.

                            The video below offers a demonstration of the key differences between an ATP and A3 meter:

                            What are the dangers of failing to detect all three adenosine molecules?

                            When ATP degrades to ADP and AMP, it does so in an effort to conserve energy and preserve life. Processes such as fermentation certainly change the levels of detectable ATP, but the organic residue is still there. The problem is, organic residue is an excellent breeding ground for bacteria and this next generation of bacteria could include ATP.

                            When ATP, ADP, and AMP are detected, they generate a reading for RLU. As you can see in this graph, a high RLU reading indicates the presence of organic residue and a poor clean. You will also see that this directly correlates with the amount of bacteria present on the surface. Put simply, a high RLU reading can be seen as a clear indicator of a high bacterial count. This bacteria has the potential to impact the safety, quality, and taste of your finished product. It could also result in turbidity – turning your beer to a cloudy substance.

                            Why is A3 technology especially suited to a brewery? 

                            As previously mentioned, ATP degrades to ADP and AMP during the fermentation process.

                            Fermentation involves the breakdown of glucose through glycolysis, which yields a limited amount of ATP compared to oxidative phosphorylation. High levels of ATP are generally observed towards the start of this process. However, as fermentation progresses and the availability of fermentable sugars decreases, the metabolic activity of yeasts slows down, leading to a gradual decrease in ATP.

                            This is the point at which accurate hygiene monitoring becomes crucial. An ATP test will detect the decrease in ATP and will read this as an indication of a clean surface without any organic residue. Conversely, an A3 meter will identify the presence of ADP and AMP. It will correctly detect the presence of organic residue and will let your operatives know that the surface or equipment is in need of further cleaning.

                            The graphs below provide real life examples of this technology at work. Fig A shows the increased sensitivity of the A3 meter from Kikkoman when compared to traditional ATP testing. Fig B displays the different results provided by ATP and A3 testing in regards to fermented foods and fungi residues. As you can see, in every instance, the ATP tests display a pass result, whereas the A3 tests reveal a high RLU reading and, by extension, a high bacterial count.

                            Fig A

                            Fig B

                            How do I carry out effective hygiene monitoring at my brewery?

                            When it comes to validating brewery cleans – it is recommended that multiple “hot spots” are tested across production. In the example used below, four key “hot spots” are being tested: the Can Filler Head, the Canning “Bubble Breaker”, the Undercover Gasser, and the Can Line Conveyer Belt.

                            This testing was carried out at the Great Central Brewing Company and took place over a period of four months. During this time, the four “hot spots” were tested with an A3 meter and saw a significant decrease in RLU. As the operatives gained a more accurate understanding of how effective their cleaning processes were, they were able to achieve an increased level of cleanliness and more consistent sanitation control.

                            The testing of multiple points is particularly important in breweries because it protects against both primary contamination (brewing) and secondary contamination (bottling). With 50% of contaminations attributed to bottling, you need to be vigilant at every part of the process. When establishing your own “hot spots”, you should factor in the following points of contamination:

                            Primary Contamination

                            • Measuring instruments
                            • Valves and dead ends
                            • Gas pipes
                            • Floor surfaces
                            • Plate heat exchangers
                            • Filters

                            Secondary Contamination

                            • Sealing, crowning, and filling equipment
                            • Bottle inspector
                            • Bottle washer
                            • Surrounding environment
                            • Airborne contamination during trip from washing to filling to sealing equipment

                            What are the key benefits of an A3 monitor?

                            As this article explains, the key benefit of an A3 monitor is its heightened sensitivity – capable of detecting molecules that go unnoticed by traditional ATP tests. Aside from more accurate and reliable results, the A3 system also offers a number of other benefits:

                            • Lightweight
                            • Easy-to-use, with auto-calibration
                            • Set your own limits for pass/fail results (supported by the Klipspringer team)
                            • Automatic temperature compensation
                            • Eliminates false negative readings
                            • Free technical support
                            • Next day delivery for all swabs
                            • Superior sensitivity to ATP meters - precise measurement of ATP, ADP, and AMP
                            • Data visualisation in the app - results are easy to analyse
                            • Bluetooth connection - access results from any location

                            How does an A3 meter eliminate false negative readings?

                            Another key benefit of A3 technology is that it resolves a common issue present in ATP systems. ATP tests often display a reading of 0 after swabbing. Understandably, operatives take this as a sign of a surface passing the test and rarely investigate the results. However, a reading of 0 can also occur if a swab has been compromised – misused by the operative or exposed to a high concentration of chemical detergent. There could also be an issue with the enzyme in the swab or the swab itself could be faulty.

                            In direct response to this issue, the A3 meter always produces a reading above zero (normally between 1-8), even if the levels of ATP, AMP, and ADP are extremely low. If an A3 meter ever displays a 0, this indicates a potential fault that requires further investigation.

                            What support will you receive if you introduce A3 technology into your brewery?

                            When collecting feedback on the A3 system, an additional plus point shared by its users has been the ongoing support provided by the Klipspringer team. Working closely with a group of micro-biologists, we will be on hand to help you establish and validate referential benchmarks for your A3 testing.

                            We can also provide training for your operatives, answering questions, sharing resources, and encouraging your team to engage with the new equipment. Instead of going it alone, you will have a team of experts to support you with the role out.


                            So that brings us to the end of our guide to Hygiene Monitoring within the brewing industry. We hope that this article has highlighted the benefits of establishing an accurate and reliable testing method at your site. We also hope that it has offered a comprehensive explanation of A3 technology and the reasons behind the industry turning away from conventional ATP tests, favouring instead the heightened sensitivity of an A3 meter.

                            If you would like any further guidance, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with your enquiries. Our in-house A3 expert Radek Tameczka will also be available to provide support and relevant resources. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation

                            If you would like further guidance relating to Hygiene Monitoring, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                              trade-in

                              Klipspringer's Scales Trade-In Scheme: An Introduction

                              Upgrade to the food industry's most durable and reliable scales, with a £50 or £100 trade-in voucher for your new equipment.

                              Here at Klipspringer, we have been working with food and beverage production sites for over twenty years. This has granted us an in depth understanding of the pressures faced by factories and the people who work within them.

                              Determined to help you manage these pressures, we are always on the look out for opportunities to solve common complaints – providing innovative solutions at every turn.

                              One such solution includes our Scales Trade-In Scheme, a system that allows you to upgrade your scales and balances, all whilst saving money and taking a step closer to your sustainability targets. We will then take responsibility for recycling your scales – operating in compliance with the WEEE Directive.

                              This scheme will be running throughout January, so now is the perfect time to find out if you qualify.

                              Which scales are included in this trade-in scheme?

                              There are two models included in our trade-in scheme: the KS1 scales and the Gladiator Washdown scales. If you have either of these models at your site, this could be a great opportunity for you to hand over the disposal of your old scales and secure a trade-in voucher for your new ones.

                              KS1 Scales

                              £50 Trade-In Voucher

                              Gladiator Washdown Scales

                              £100 Trade-In Voucher

                              • IP68-rated for total protection against water and dust.
                              • Two large screens for easy measurement readings.
                              • Checkweighing LEDs clearly show under, over and within acceptable limits.
                              • IP68-rated for total protection against water and dust.
                              • Weight capacity ranging from 8kg-150kg.
                              • High-quality 304 grade stainless steel pan.

                              How do I trade-in my old scales?

                              1. First, reach out to the Klipspringer team on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Let us know which scales you want to purchase and how many you need to buy. If you’re unsure about the best fit for your site, our team will be happy to help.
                              2. Once you have confirmed your order, you will receive an official order acknowledgement, along with a returns form for your old scales.
                              3. Next, your order will be despatched. Orders are usually sent out on the same day using an overnight courier, so you could receive your scales the next working day.
                              4. The final step is to complete your returns form and enclose it with your old scales before sending them back to Klipspringer. You will find the returns instructions and address on the form itself.

                              What resources are available to support me with my scales?

                              We have created a number of resources to support you through the process of purchasing and using your scales. Click the images or titles below to be taken to the relevant articles.

                              A Complete Guide to Food Industry Scales

                              This comprehensive guide takes you through the different types of scales available. From waterproof and washdown scales to trade-approved and catering scales, there are a wide range of options available and a lot to consider. By the end of this article, you should be able to identify the best fit for your site – understanding the importance of factors such as the materials used to make your scale and the importance of calibration.

                              How to use Calibrated Reference Weights to Check the Accuracy of Your Scales

                              If you have any concerns about checking the accuracy of your scales, this guide will take you through every step of the process. Ideally, scales should be verified at least once a day before use, so this is an important process to understand. This article will also support you with the purchasing of reference weights – helping you decide on the best material, size, and quantity.

                              Help Guide: How to Select the Right Scales For Your Factory

                              Highlighting the importance of readability, weighing units, capacity, and the size of your pan or platform, this article takes a closer look at the key considerations to have in mind when selecting your scales. It also explains some of the most popular special features, including parts counting, percentage weighing, zero-tracking, a hold function, LED displays, and a speedy stabilisation time.

                              If you would like further guidance relating to our Scales Trade-In Scheme, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                Scale

                                Help Guide: How to Select the Right Scales For Your Factory

                                From readability and weighing units to capacity and special features, this guide takes you through the process of finding the right scales for your factory.

                                If you have been tasked with selecting suitable scales for your site, we would understand if you are finding it hard to narrow down the options. After all, there are so many models available and this can make it difficult to identify the features that are truly worth your while.

                                With this in mind, we have created a guide to take you through the key considerations when selecting your scales. Before making any big decisions, you should be asking yourself the following questions:

                                #1 What application(s) will your scales be used for?

                                #2 What size does the pan or platform of your scales need to be?

                                #3 What capacity do you require?

                                #4 What weighing units do you need?

                                #5 What are your readability requirements?

                                #6 Do you require any special features?

                                #1 What application(s) will your scales be used for?

                                First things first, you need to list the application(s) your scales are going to be used for. This will leave you with a better understanding of the specific requirements of your site. It will also help you to identify how many scales are required. It might be that you need a number of scales, all with different features and functions. Or, it could be that you can use the same scales for a range of applications.

                                Typically, scales will be used for the following applications:

                                • Counting parts
                                • General warehouse
                                • Shipping and receiving
                                • Manufacturing

                                • Materials testing
                                • Laboratory testing or research
                                • Food processing and preparation
                                • Field applications

                                #2 What size does the pan or platform of your scales need to be?

                                When it comes to working out the size of your pan or platform, there are two key factors to consider. First, you will need to think about the proposed location of your scales. If you are faced with space restrictions, you may require a smaller platform or even a portable device. If your scales are heading to a laboratory, a benchtop model may be better suited to the space, whereas floor scales may be the right pick for a large production space without any free surfaces. Another option would be versatile bench and floor scales, as they will adapt to your set-up.

                                The second consideration is the size of the products you are planning to weigh. After all, you don’t want anything to fall off the top of the scales – wasting time, causing hassle for your operatives, and compromising the integrity of your product. If you are at all unsure, get your production team involved and find out how they feel about the pan or platform size currently in use.

                                Typical industry scales range from 250mm x 250mm to 1500mm x 1500mm.

                                #3 What capacity do you require?

                                The next step is to factor in the maximum amount that your scales need to weigh. This will help you to establish your required capacity. Luckily, there are a wide range of capacity options available, so you should be able to find the ideal model for your application.

                                Say you are searching for rugged and reliable scales for your warehouse or production floor, large platform scales with a maximum capacity of 3000kg could be the perfect choice. Conversely, if you are searching for compact, portable scales to measure much smaller items, precision scales with a maximum capacity of 1500g should do the trick.

                                When you are establishing the maximum capacity of your scales, it’s important that you include the weight of any containers. Otherwise, you could end up with scales that are capable of weighing your product, but produce an automatic capacity warning when the product is inside a food handling container. You will then be faced with the hassle of returning your scales. Or, if it is too late, your operatives will have to shift products in and out of containers – wasting time and undermining your standards of safety and hygiene.

                                Typical industry scales range from 120g to 3000kg.

                                #4 What weighing units do you need?

                                Another key consideration is the weighing units related to your application(s). Most scales offer a range of units, so if you would like to use a device for multiple applications and access more than one unit at a time, selecting a versatile model could be ideal. Equally, if your site only measures in one unit, you could lower your expenses and make life simpler for your operatives by selecting scales that work with just the relevant units.

                                Typically, larger designs such as platform and crane scales will offer a smaller range of weighing units. This is because they tend to be used for the same application every time, and only really deal with: grams, kilograms, pounds, and newtons. However, analytical scales, designed for detailed measuring tasks, can offer anything from common units such as milligrams and grams to more unusual units such as giganewtons and drams. Some systems even give you the option of introducing a custom unit.

                                Weighing units include grams, kilograms, pounds, ounces, newtons, milligrams, giganewtons, carats, and drams.

                                #5 What are your readability requirements?

                                Put simply, readability is the smallest increment that could be displayed on the screen of your scales. As with the platform size, weighing units, and capacity of your scales, your readability requirements will be dependent on the applications taking place at your factory.

                                If, for example, your operatives are measuring ingredients and working to a precise recipe, they will need a device that works to multiple decimal places. In contrast, if your shipping and receiving team are using scales to ascertain the overall weight of a delivery, they are unlikely to need such specific results.

                                Typically, readability runs up to 0.0001g.

                                #6 Do you require any special features?

                                The final step is to identify any special features that would significantly enhance your scales. Below are just a few options for you to explore:

                                • Parts Counting: speeds up packaging tasks
                                • Percentage weighing: simplifies baking and recipe batching
                                • Rechargeable batteries: allows you to move your scales to any location
                                • Short stabilisation time: speeds up weighing process
                                • Durable design e.g. rubber feet, overload protection, sealed keypad: increases lifespan
                                • IP68 Waterproof rating: suited to washdown environments
                                • Removable pan: easier to use and clean
                                • Front and rear display: allows for two readings at once
                                • Zero-tracking feature: returns to zero reading after each use
                                • LED display: easy viewing
                                • Hold function: freezes displayed weight

                                Again, it would be a good idea to speak with your production team, listing any features that could help them with their daily duties. You should also look into any issues with your previous scales. Perhaps they broke because of an overload or failed due to water damage. Another possibility is that they made life harder for your operatives – perhaps they were overcomplicated or lacking a vital function. This could be an opportunity for you to stop these problems from surfacing again.

                                Finally, you should try to arrange a demonstration of your prospective scales. Another option would be to watch any video tutorials provided by your supplier. This will help you to get to grips with the special features – understanding the benefits and identifying opportunities to enhance your operation.

                                Introducing Our Trade-In Scheme

                                Once you have selected your new scales, you should consider the benefits of our trade-in scheme. Here at Klipspringer, we have launched an initiative that allows you to receive money off your new scales by trading in your old models. Instead of having the added hassle of recycling your old scales, we will do this for you – working in compliance with the WEEE Directive.

                                This should help you to reduce your expenses and meet your sustainability targets. To learn more about this option, contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. You could also fill out the contact form below.


                                So that brings us to the end of our guide to selecting the right scales for your site. The good news is, reading this article means you are already halfway there – weighing up your options before making a decision that will seriously impact your site, operatives, and finished product. If you would like any further support, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with any enquiries. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.   

                                If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                  Klipspringer Kicks Off 2024 with a Full Team Event

                                  It has become a Klipspringer tradition to open each year with a full team event. In fact, just last year, we hosted four company-wide gatherings across the twelve months.

                                  We knew 2024 had to be bigger and better than ever, so we launched The Klipspringer Conference. Hosted at Adastral Park in Ipswich, this conference featured panel discussions, workshops, team building exercises, and even a tour of the BT Innovation Centre.

                                  Inspired and enthused, we wanted to share a brief rundown of the event – sharing our highlights and shining a light on the fantastic individuals who make up the Klipspringer team.

                                  A Fireside Chat With The Klipspringer Team

                                  The first activity of the day was a Fireside Chat hosted by Klipspringer Director, Alex Carlyon. This chat brought together five representatives of the Klipspringer workforce:

                                  • Anna Bloom and Fraser Carlyon from the Business Development Team
                                  • Hadley Smith from the Commercial Team
                                  • Svetlana Liubomirskaja, Team Leader of the Klipspringer Laboratory
                                  • Sam Smith, Director of Sales and Marketing

                                  During this fireside discussion, the panel were asked about Klipspringer’s culture – partaking in an open conversation about life at the company and sharing any ideas for improvement. The panel also shared their highlights of 2023, ranging from the arrival of new team members and team building activities, to customer success stories and the joys of working with different departments.

                                  The future of Klipspringer was another key talking point, with both the panel and audience asked to imagine the company in ten years time, exploring the different challenges and opportunities that might arise.

                                  The Klipspringer Awards 2023

                                  Next, it was time to announce the winners of The Klipspringer Awards 2023. This year, there were six categories, and with 100% of the Klipspringer team taking the time to nominate their co-workers, we were all extremely excited to find out the results.

                                  Darryl James, Warehouse and Production Manager, received the Energetic Dynamo Award. An enthusiastic individual who spent 2023 going above and beyond for the people around him, Darryl was an extremely deserving winner.

                                  The Rising Star Award was presented to Hadley Smith, a recent addition to the Commercial Department. Already an expert in TRAKKD (our cloud-based quality management system), Hadley has quickly established himself as an invaluable member of the Klipspringer team.

                                  Up next we had the Customer First Award, with this honour going to Louise Britton. An exceptional member of the Customer Support Team, Louise worked tirelessly throughout 2023 to protect and nurture relationships with our valued customers.

                                  The fourth award went to Steph Dijon, recognising her as Klipspringer’s Unsung Hero. As our Finance Manager, Steph plays an essential role in our operation. This year she has been an inspiration to many, demonstrating an unwavering commitment to Klipspringer’s core values.

                                  On the subject of core values, Graphic Designer Cath Strawson received the Hero of Values award. Throughout the year Cath has been a paragon of care, competence, and focus – collaborating with a number of different departments and bringing the new Klipspringer Product Catalogue to print.

                                  Finally, we had the Ray of Sunshine category, with Austin Solomon securing a landslide victory. Working as Klipspringer’s Operations Assistant, Austin can always be found with a smile on his face, uplifting and inspiring his co-workers with every interaction.

                                  Klipspringer's Directors Share Their Vision

                                  Once we had recovered from the thrill of the awards, it was time for Klipspringer’s Directors to share their vision for the year ahead. During this portion of the day, our leadership team outlined five key objectives for 2024 and provided an exciting update on our upcoming move to a new Head Quarters.

                                  This was a fantastic opportunity for everyone to get on the same page in preparation for the year ahead. This segment also highlighted Klipspringer’s ongoing commitment to honesty and integrity, with team members at every level encouraged to ask questions, provide feedback, and engage with the information provided.

                                  Exploring BT's Innovation Centre

                                  We couldn’t have left Adastral Park without first exploring BT’s range of industry-themed innovation showcases. That is why the Klipspringer workforce temporarily broke off into four teams, with each group taking it in turns to tour the Innovation Hub. 

                                  During these tours, we were introduced to emerging concepts such as: 3D printing, holograms, immersive 360° video content, and computer vision technologies.

                                  This experience was not only informative, but also inspiring – directing our attention towards the future and helping us to consider the many possibilities that lie ahead.

                                  Refreshments & The Klipspringer Band

                                  It wouldn’t be a team event without a performance from The Klipspringer Band. This musical display from the Carlyon brothers provided a wonderful backdrop to the continental breakfast enjoyed at the start of the event.

                                  Later on in the day, we also enjoyed a buffet lunch from catering company: Lexington Catering. This delicious spread featured everything from tortellini to katsu curry. Finished off with brownie bites and fruit platters, it certainly gave us the energy to power through our afternoon activities.

                                  Klipspringer's Objective Workshops

                                  Led by Klipspringer’s team of Directors, there were five workshops hosted in the afternoon – all tied to different objectives.

                                  Bringing together team members from different departments, these workshops encouraged participants to dream up strategies for the improvement of our products, customer experience, and overall operation.

                                  Creativity was key and, as always, there was no such thing as a bad idea! Instead, the Klipspringer team came together to celebrate the brilliant minds that make up our workforce. We also kept a record of any plans with potential, so watch this space in 2024.

                                  Another Successful Full Team Event!

                                  Last but not least, we enjoyed an activity that asked everyone to write their SMART goals for the year on a puzzle piece. These pieces were then grouped together to form a complete image – a clever representation of how individual effort can fuel collective growth.

                                  Determined to hold ourselves accountable, these goals were: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timebound.

                                  Once the puzzle was complete, several lucky team members were given the chance to draw a golden ticket and receive a prize. This final activity was extremely fitting, with team members cheering each other on and celebrating any big wins.

                                  Notably, Nikki Bird, Accounts Receivable Team Leader, closed the day with the ultimate display of Klipspringer spirit – winning so many prizes that she opted to hand one over to another department, so that everyone could share in her success.

                                  All in all, the day was a triumph – a celebration of all we achieved in 2023 and the perfect start to a fantastic year ahead!


                                  Top Moments

                                  Klipspringer's Year-in-Review: A Rundown of Our Top Moments From 2023

                                  Here at Klipspringer, we have enjoyed a fantastic 2023, with a whole host of exciting developments. We launched The Food Safety Innovation Conference, expanded our collection of webinars, published three hard-copy bulletins, attended a wide range of industry events, and even arranged a team expedition to Turkey (well, sort of!)

                                  Below, we have listed just a few of our favourite moments, none of which would have been possible without your ongoing business and unwavering support. As the year draws to a close, we wanted to say a huge thank you and to express our excitement for the unlimited possibilities of 2024.

                                  We cycled to the Turkish border!

                                  In January, the Klipspringer team raised £1,125 by cycling a combined total of 1,380 miles – the distance from our head office in Ipswich, Suffolk, to the Turkish border. It took us three relentless weeks of cycling, but we made it!

                                  All proceeds from this fundraiser were donated via the Rapid Relief Team (RRT) United Kingdom, an organisation that provides essential supplies to earthquake victims, including lorry-loads of food boxes and vital care kits. We would like to say another huge thank you to everyone who donated.

                                  We enjoyed lots of full team events

                                  At the start of the year, we enjoyed a full team kick-off event. This celebration brought together our office workers and remote staff, along with a number of new team members. It was a fantastic opportunity for us to evaluate the previous year and to get motivated for the months ahead.

                                  Determined to keep the connection strong, we also got together for a mid-year team building event in June. Featuring lunch, refreshments, team games, and even an ice cream van, the day was our opportunity to welcome even more workers to the Klipspringer team and to make sure we were still on track for our 2023 goals.

                                  Towards the end of 2023, we met again for an end-of-year round up. At this event, we shared our biggest takeaways from the year. We also shared exciting updates, namely our plans to move to a new head office location in 2024.

                                  We continued our partnership with BRCGS

                                  As a BRCGS partner organisation, Klipspringer was a proud sponsor of the Food Safety Europe Conference in the February of 2023. With keynote speeches from Amazon, Nestlé, and Just Eat, plus invaluable insights relating to Version 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard, this event was a brilliant way to start the year.

                                  Following on from the event, BRCGS announced that the Food Safety Conference will henceforth be known as BRCGS Connect – a series of industry events launched with the intention of bringing together thought leaders in key locations across the globe.

                                  BRCGS Connect has already made its way to Toronto and Texas, with the next conference taking place in Coventry, UK, on 7-8th February 2024. Once again, Klipspringer will be sponsoring, and our friendly team is excited to see you at our exhibition booth.

                                  In the meantime, Klipspringer director Alex Carlyon, recently hosted a webinar alongside Foram Mehta, Global Standards Technical Manager at BRCGS. The webinar explored the root causes behind the most common non-conformities issued against Issue 9 of the Global Food Safety Standard so far.

                                  We exhibited at the Foodex Manufacturing Solutions Exhibition

                                  April saw the return of the Foodex Manufacturing Solutions Exibition, and the Klipspringer team was thrilled to be in attendance. A popular trade event for the food processing, packaging, and logistics industries, FMS23 drew over 25,000 visitors and 1,500 exhibitors to Birmingham’s National Exhibition Centre.

                                  In addition to connecting with a wide range of industry professionals, we also enjoyed a series of topical sessions delivered by thought leaders including:

                                  • Keith Thornhill, Head of Food and Beverage Automation at Siemens
                                  • Dan Crossley, Executive Director of the Food Ethics Council
                                  • Robin May, Chief Scientific Adviser at the Food Standards Agency
                                  • Andrew Dalziel, VP of Industry Solutions and Strategy at Infor
                                  • Lilijia Polo-Richards, Director and Founder of Allergy Companions Ltd

                                  We expanded our collection of webinars

                                  One of our key goals for 2023 was to develop the Klipspringer knowledge hub – providing even more resources for professionals working within the world of food and beverage production.

                                  With this in mind, we hosted a number of informative webinars this year, covering everything from A3 Technology and Zero Defect Food Safety to the most common non-conformities raised against Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. Our webinars wouldn’t be the same without the industry experts involved. Throughout 2023, they were elevated by the following voices:

                                  • Denis Treacy, former Chief Officer for Safety and Quality at Pladis Global
                                  • John Carter, former GFSI Board Member
                                  • Foram Mehta, Global Standards Technical Manager at BRCGS
                                  • Nigel Church, Hygiene Manager for McCain Foods
                                  • Stephan Speidel, Cleaning Verification Specialist,

                                  Klipspringer and FoodClean launched The Food Safety Innovation Conference 2023

                                  In addition to attending a whole host of industry events, we also launched one of our own. In collaboration with FoodClean, we hosted the first ever Food Safety Innovation Conference at the University of Lincoln on Tuesday 5th September.

                                  The product of months of careful planning, the FSI Conference 2023, featured presentations on Hygienic Design, Cleaning Automation and Robotics, Food Safety Management, Analytical Assurance, and Professional Development.

                                  There were also four interactive workshops:

                                  1. Equipment Design and Cleaning – hosted by Katie Satterthwaite, Factory Standards Manager for Marks and Spencer, and Phil May, Group Hygiene Manager for Greencore and podcast host of The Hygiene Hustle
                                  2. Predictive Analytics – hosted by Nikos Manouselis, Co-Founder and CEO of Agroknow
                                  3. Analytical Assurance – hosted by Marissa Schwoch, Microbiologist and Auditor at Food Microbiology Solutions Ltd and former Group Food Safety Manager for Arla Foods
                                  4. Food Safety Management Systems – hosted by Richa Bedi-Navik, Senior Global Standards Manager for BRCGS, and Helen Taylor, Technical Director at the ZERO2FIVE Food Industry Centre

                                  The day closed with our panel of experts answering questions from the event’s attendees, covering everything from biofilms and genomics to allergen cleans and the management of agency staff.

                                  Other highlights included the ongoing refreshments, networking breaks, and even a musical performance from the Klipspringer band!

                                  We are delighted to announce that the FSI Conference will be returning in June 2024. You can register your interest in the conference and secure an early-bird discount by clicking the button below.

                                  In addition to this, we recently hosted the first of many FSI webinars – building on key takeaways from the conference. This free resource provides valuable insights from Denis Treacy and John Carter, former GFSI Board Member.

                                  We celebrated the launch of the Klipspringer InFocus Bulletin

                                  Another milestone moment of 2023 was the launch of our hard copy bulletin: In Focus. So far, we have released three issues, with each issue directed towards different roles within the food production industry. Intended for Hygiene Managers, Hygiene In Focus offered top tips for anyone working in the role, a guide to the retention and engagement of employees, advice on sustainable cleaning practice, and an innovative approach to maximising the hygiene window. Technical In Focus discussed A3 monitoring and wireless temperature monitoring. It also provided top tips for Technical Managers and introduced our free, online Equipment and Calibrations Portal.

                                  Finally, Production In Focus, was sent out to operatives with an interest in managing production during a busy period, finding the right food handling and storage containers, and keeping production running during washdowns. It also introduced Klipspringer’s brand new Shadow Board Configurator – an AI tool that allows you to design storage solutions for your site.

                                  Our In Focus bulletins will continue throughout 2024, keeping you up to date with all the latest in innovative products and solutions.

                                  We prepared for the launch of a new Product Guide

                                  Determined to make it even easier for you to work with Klipspringer and explore our wide range of equipment, we have been preparing for the launch of our new product catalogue at the start of 2024. Featuring new releases and updated imagery, this catalogue should be a useful resource when it comes to finding the right equipment for your site. The Klipspringer team has had great fun this year taking shots for the catalogue and filming video demonstrations for our website.

                                  We hosted a series of Industry Forums

                                  Our Industry Forums were another highlight – bringing together professionals from technical, hygiene, and food safety teams. Hosted at the FoodClean Experience Centre in Lincoln, these sessions included round table discussions and networking opportunities, plus demos and product trials in a Dedicated Innovation Food Factory.

                                  In addition to a delicious breakfast and lunch, attendees also received actionable insights and invaluable feedback from both their peers and a selection of industry experts.  

                                  We learnt a lot from Hospitality Events

                                  In addition to working with food and beverage production sites, Klipspringer also supports commercial kitchens – providing solutions for equipment storage, food oil management, temperature monitoring and more.  

                                  With this in mind, we attended this year’s Hotel, Restaurant and Catering Show and heard from a whole host of industry experts, including MasterChef judge Monica Galletti.  

                                  Later in the year, Klipspringer exhibited at the Commercial Kitchen Show – answering customer queries and showcasing our range of innovative solutions. 


                                  So that brings us to the end of our 2023 round up. We would like to thank you once again for your business and loyal support over the past 12 months. We would also like to wish you, your family, and your colleagues an enjoyable festive period. On that subject, if you would like to note down our opening times, you can click here for the relevant dates.

                                  As for 2024, we look forward to bringing you even more exciting developments – providing innovative products and solutions, not to mention, informative resources and ongoing customer support.


                                  hard-to-reach

                                  How to Clean and Maintain the Hard-to-Reach Areas of Your Factory

                                  Early audit data suggests hygiene is a key area of non-conformance against Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. In a recent webinar, Foram Mehta, Technical Manager for BRCGS, explored the possible reasons behind this. She discussed staff shortages, increased production demands, and a rise in unannounced audits. She also talked about hard-to-reach areas, suggesting a number of sites are failing to properly investigate their cleaning procedures and get to grips with the out-of-site aspects of their operation.

                                  With this in mind, we have put together a guide to cleaning and maintaining the hard-to-reach areas of your factory. From the best way to conduct an internal inspection to the range of equipment available, this article should empower you to have confidence in your cleaning – inspiring your operatives and impressing even the most meticulous of auditors.

                                  #1 Carry Out Internal Inspections

                                  First and foremost, you need to carry out regular inspections of your site, paying particular attention to those hard-to-reach areas. This shouldn’t be an exercise in catching out your operatives or making them feel bad for any oversights. Instead, your inspections should be presented as a learning opportunity for everyone involved. After all, every issue you identify is an issue that can be resolved before your next official audit.

                                  When conducting an inspection, you should remember the following points:

                                  • Try to find the areas your Hygiene Team may have overlooked. Search for small crevices and awkward spaces that would be time consuming to clean.
                                  • Get down on your hands and knees. You are not carrying out a thorough inspection unless you are looking in, under, and around your machines and equipment.
                                  • Instead of carrying out your inspections independently, ask your colleagues to share this responsibility. A fresh pair of eyes could spot something you have missed.
                                  • You could also ask someone from a sister site to inspect your factory. If they are less familiar with your processes, they are more likely to ask questions.
                                  • Don't be predictable. If you inspect your site on the same day every time, your operatives will know when to raise their standards.

                                  What equipment do you need to carry out an inspection?

                                  As previously mentioned, you should be looking in, under, and around your machinery. Your inspections should be fairly physical, so you will need to equip yourself with knee pads or a kneeling pad that have been approved by your Technical Team.

                                  You will also need to wear the standard food safety PPE. Remembering to do so will prevent you from contaminating clean areas as you inspect them.

                                  Another important step is to bring an LED hygiene torch. This will make it so much easier for you to investigate small and dark crevices.

                                  When it comes to the stationery you carry around site, it’s important that they are detectable, otherwise you are increasing the risk of a foreign body making its way into your product. You should also embrace the ethos of: prevention before detection, opting for durable equipment that is shatterproof and features the smallest number of pieces possible.

                                  #2 Train Your Operatives

                                  The next step is to train your operatives, drawing their attention to the hard-to-reach areas you are trying to tackle. During your training, you will need to stress the importance of cleaning these areas. You should share the early data from BRCGS, explain the consequences of receiving a non-conformity or failing an audit, and bring everything back to the safety of your consumers.

                                  Accountability is key, so another idea is to make individual operatives responsible for specific areas of your site. Whether its the underside of a production belt or the tight gap behind a machine, assigning these spaces to trust-worthy workers will ensure they are a key part of your process. These spaces are even less likely to go overlooked if you celebrate and reward your operatives for their hard work and dedication.

                                  #3 Evaluate Your Equipment

                                  In order for your Hygiene Team to carry out an effective clean, it’s essential they are working with the right tools. For every awkward space there is a utensil designed to reach it, so it’s just a case of making yourself aware of the options available.

                                  Listed below are five examples of equipment that has been made with hard-to-reach areas in mind. When you are carrying out your internal inspections, try to keep an eye out for any spaces that could require utensils such as these:

                                  Flexible Pipe Brushes

                                  If your hygiene operatives are currently struggling to navigate the pipework at your factory, the solution could be a Flexible Pipe Brush. Capable of bending to the contours of the surface being cleaned, this brush will simplify the process of cleaning high reach pipes and ledges. Available in a large and medium size, this style of brush is food contact approved and has been hygienically designed to meet the current food safety standards. It also has a temperature tolerance of 134°C, so your hygiene team won’t be slowed down by hot pipes or equipment.

                                  Tank, Tube, and Bottle Brushes

                                  Tank Brushes are made from water-resistant filaments and have a symmetrical profile to ensure effective cleaning in cylindrical vessels. Another useful utensil, Bottle Brushes can tackle spaces with internal diameters ranging from 7-8mm to 60mm. There is also the option of working with a detachable version that can be attached to a long, flexible handle. Finally, Tube Brushes clean tubes with internal diameters ranging from 70mm to 120mm. Some tube brushes feature a universal thread that fits a range of handles, allowing you to select the right length for your application.

                                  Telescopic Handles

                                  If some of the hard-to-reach areas at your site are high off the ground, you could be in need of a Telescopic Handle. This style of handle is extremely durable, yet light enough not to put your operatives at risk of injury or strain. Telescopic handles have a twist-lock fitting that holds them at the desired or maximum extended length. This means they are able to reach further than the standard brush, mop, or squeegee handle. Ideally, your handle should have a universal thread that is interchangeable between utensils as this will allow your team to perform a range of processes.

                                  Long Handled Brushes

                                  Long Handled Brushes allow your operatives to probe deeply into hard-to-reach areas without risk to their arms or hands. Often, these brushes feature a diameter guard that prevents the brush from slipping too far into the space. This eliminates the risk of your worker getting stuck or dropping their utensil into an awkward spot. Flexibility is another popular feature, with a lot of long handled brushes offering a blend of durability and pliability – capable of reaching round corners and into tight spaces. These brushes also tend to be narrow, ideal for squeezing between or behind your machines.

                                  Detail Brushes

                                  Length isn’t always the secret to reaching those tight and narrow spaces. In some cases, you might need a small and thin utensil to squeeze between the mechanisms of your machinery. This is when a Detail Brush comes in handy. With short, extra stiff bristles and a ‘scraper nose’ for added impact, this tool has been designed with stubborn residues in mind. Its handle is short for increased leverage, and has been ergonomically designed for improved grip and comfort. A Short Machine Brush, otherwise known as a ‘Fish Brush’ could also be used for detailed cleans.

                                  #4 Update your Cleaning Instruction Cards

                                  If your Hygiene Team is populated with agency staff who are only present for a couple of days at a time, it could be difficult for them to familiarise themselves with the intricacies of your site. Here, you should take preventative measures, highlighting any hard-to-reach areas before they go overlooked. Including these spaces in your Cleaning Instruction Cards is a great way to do this, as even new operatives will have no excuse for ignoring instructions that are clearly documented and accompanied by visual prompts.

                                  When adding these spaces to your Cleaning Instruction Cards, you should include photos of what the area should look like once it has been suitably cleaned. This will boost accountability and give your operatives something to aim for. You will also need to list the specialist equipment that should be used to carry out these cleans, otherwise your Hygiene Team will struggle to achieve the desired results.

                                  Another point to consider is the fact that hard-to-reach areas are often difficult to get to, with operatives often having to reach inside or around machinery. Because of this, health and safety instructions should make up a large portion of your Cleaning Instruction Cards. From a step-by-step guide to locking off the machine to the importance of using a cleaning brush with a diameter guard, it’s impossible to overstate the value of including these details.


                                  So there you have it, a guide to cleaning and maintaining the hard-to-reach areas of your site. Whilst this could be mistaken for an additional responsibility and an increase to your workload, properly managing these spaces should make your life a lot easier.

                                  Say an auditor comes to site and takes a closer look at an out-of-sight area. Instead of feeling a sense of dread, just imagine the pride and confidence you will be filled with if you know this space has been suitably cleaned. Audits will no longer be a worrying prospect. Instead, they will become an opportunity for you and your operatives to show off your collective hard work.

                                  With over 20 years of industry experience, the Klipspringer team would be very happy to provide support as you evaluate the hard-to-reach areas of your site. For further guidance or an introduction to our extensive range of cleaning equipment, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                                  If you would like further guidance relating to your cleaning equipment and brushes, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                    Lock out

                                    Help Guide: How to Establish a Successful Lock Out Program at Your Site

                                    This guide takes you through the process of creating and maintaining a successful Lock Out Program at your factory.

                                    A Lock Out, Tag Out (LOTO) Program is a health and safety procedure that ensures dangerous machinery is shut off and unable to reconnect during repairs, maintenance, and cleaning. Most frequently carried out by Engineering and Hygiene teams, this process is an essential part of securing audit compliance and protecting the operatives at your site.

                                    If your site is home to machines that feature blades, linkage, or chains, it is likely that you already have a strict Lock Out Program in place. Even so, there is always room for improvement, especially when the reputation of your brand and the lives of your workers are at risk.

                                    It could also be the case that you are about to introduce a new piece of machinery to your site and would like to step up your program in anticipation of its arrival. Whatever the case, the following guide will help you to make the right decisions for your site.

                                    #1 Find the right Lock Out equipment for your factory

                                    The first step is to find the right Lock Out equipment for your site. Before making any big decisions, it is a good idea to take a tour of your factory to identify any areas where your current process could be enhanced. You should also make a note of any new machinery that requires corresponding lock out equipment.

                                    Why not invite operatives from your engineering and hygiene teams to come along for the tour? Your Health and Safety representatives should also be in attendance.

                                    In terms of the equipment you should be considering, the key pieces are listed below. To learn about them in further detail, you can click on the relevant images:

                                    Lock Out Plug Covers

                                    This cover surrounds your electrical plug and prevents it from reconnecting. It can withstand chemicals and extreme temperatures – ideal for areas that undergo regular washdowns. It also features a rotating design for easy installation in tight spaces.

                                    Gate Valve Covers

                                    Also able to withstand chemicals and extreme temperatures, this rotating device surrounds the operating handle of a valve and prevents it from re-opening. This isolates power within a piece of machinery as your Hygiene Team cleans it.

                                    Universal Circuit Breakers

                                    These miniature circuit breakers are compatible with all Masterlock padlocks and hasps. Instead of using tools, you can rely on the thumb dial screw to lock each breaker into position. Once this has been done, the dial will be inaccessible.

                                    Adjustable Cable 

                                    Tough yet flexible, this pull-tight cable system features an integrated hasp. This means it is ideally suited to the lock out of multiple circuit breaker panels and side-by-side gate valves. Simply feed the cable through the points in need of locking out, back through the lock out body, then pull tight.

                                    Standard Lock Out Kit

                                    Featuring six padlocks, six miniature circuit breakers, two universal circuit breakers, three lock out gate valves, a universal ball valve lock out, three cable lock outs, and two safety hasps, this collection of lock out essentials comes in a handy toolbox carrier. Secure all your equipment in one go.

                                    Portable Group Lock Out Box

                                    This portable box is the ideal place to store keys for the padlocks used to lock out equipment across your site. Once they keys are inside the box, authorised operatives can lock a personal safety padlock onto the box and only remove it when the necessary work has been carried out.

                                    Keyed Padlock

                                    Designed with lock out applications in mind, this durable, lightweight, non-conductive padlock is suitable for indoor and outdoor use. There is one unique key for each padlock, and the padlock itself is key-retaining, so it will never be left unlocked.

                                    Lock Out Hasp

                                    Hasps are useful when multiple operatives are working in the same area. The first operative locks off a machine, attaching a hasp, then everyone else working in the area adds their padlocks. The machine will only run again once all the padlocks have been removed.

                                    IndeliMarking

                                    You can IndeliMark your keys and padlocks. This is the process of using specialist lasers to change the molecular structure of a surface to create contrasting impressions – permanently branding your equipment without undermining hygiene or food safety.

                                    #2 Introduce Visual Management

                                    Although having the right lock out equipment at your site is a great place to start, this needs to be more than a tick box exercise. It is vital that everyone at work or visiting is aware of the procedures in place. From the senior leader who manages the lock out process to the operative who simply has to understand why a machine is not available, everyone needs to be aware of their role.

                                    Introducing Visual Management to your site should help you to achieve this. 90% of the information transmitted to the brain is visual, so it is likely that brightly coloured displays with lots of images will grab the attention of your operatives, assisting them in the identification of lock out points and reminding them not to engage with a piece of locked out machinery.

                                    Visual Management will also help you to communicate with team members that don’t have English as their first language, operatives who struggle with their memory and eyesight, along with agency staff who are new to your site and unfamiliar with their surroundings.

                                    Below are four examples of Visual Management for you to explore:

                                    Tags

                                    Designed to withstand the daily demands of a factory, these tags can be added to lock out points to draw attention to the fact that the machinery should not be in use and should only be released by a designated operative. The name and department of this operative can be added to the tag, further increasing accountability and eliminating confusion. There is also space to add the date and time at which the machine is expected to be back up and running. An operative who needs to use the machine can either plan their work accordingly or chase the individual in charge of removing the tag and the lock out equipment.

                                    Signs

                                    Your site will also need signs that reflect and reinforce your Lock Out Program. Examples include Machinery Mandatory signs that convey expectations surrounding the locking out of a machine and the placement of each lock out point e.g. lock out here before working on this equipment. Machinery Prohibition signs are also important. They can be used to tell your operatives what not to do e.g. do not tamper with the lock out devices. And finally, there are Machinery Warning signs that will alert your operatives to the specific risks involved. When it comes to lock out equipment, this tends to be an electrical threat. These signs can also share the best course of action e.g. lock out devices must be removed by authorised personnel only.

                                    Projecting Signs

                                    Another way to grab the attention of your operatives is with the use of an Easyfix Projecting sign. If you are concerned that your site is currently contravening government guidelines or best practice expectations, this is a quick and easy solution. Such a prominent sign will put your lock out process on the map, making sure operatives, auditors, and visiting customers know that it’s an important part of your operation, and one that is taken seriously. Easy installation also allows for easy removal and relocation, something that will be particularly useful if a piece of machinery is moved or a lock out point is changed.

                                    Free-Standing Floor Signs

                                    It might be that you already have signs and tags in use at your site, but you are concerned that your operatives are still overlooking the guidance provided. A Free-standing Floor sign should help to bring this matter back to the forefront of their minds. Impossible to miss, it can be moved around your site to sit next to each piece of locked out equipment. It could also be used to convey the locking out of all the machines within a specific area, something that is likely to happen if an intensive washdown is taking place. Although your Hygiene Team will still want to check that each machine has its individual tags, signs, and lock out devices, a floor sign will provide an initial indication of whether or not an area is ready to be cleaned.

                                    Shadow Boards

                                    You should consider a Shadow Board for the storage of your lock out essentials. Instead of equipment going missing or being used incorrectly, you can ensure it is kept in the correct place at all times. If you introduce colour coding and have separate Shadow Boards for different production lines, you will also be able to tell, at a glance, which machines are locked out and which are in use. Your operatives will be able to make the same assessment, helping them to structure their shifts and raise concerns if the lock out equipment for a piece of machinery that shouldn’t be active is still hanging on the board.

                                    #3 Prioritise the training of your operatives

                                    Last, but by no means least, you need to consider the training of your operatives. As with everything that takes place at your site, it will be impossible to secure success without first securing the cooperation of your workforce.

                                    When establishing your training strategy, it’s important to remember that everyone at your site will be impacted by your Lock Out Program. After all, a failure to uphold it could result in serious injury or even a fatality. A careless approach could also lead to the closure of your factory, so the employment of every team member is dependant on your site’s ability to meet the relevant standards and specifications.

                                    When establishing your training strategy, you will need to work your way through the four questions listed below:

                                    Which operatives are performing the lock out procedures at my site?

                                    The Engineering Team

                                    Your engineering team will need to lock out the machines at your site when they carry out essential maintenance and repairs.

                                    • An engineer should be involved in the purchasing process behind securing the right lock out equipment for your site.
                                    • Encourage your engineering team to collaborate with different department leads – making sure everyone is aware of their strategy and appreciative of their work.
                                    • Nominate your most experienced and affable engineer to lead the training in this department, under your supervision.

                                    The Hygiene Team

                                    Along with your engineering team, it is possible that your hygiene operatives will take responsibility for locking out dangerous or complex equipment before a clean.

                                    • Adopt a similar approach to the one in place for your engineering team – give hygiene a voice at the table, encourage collaboration, and appoint a team leader.
                                    • Ensure instructions for the lock out of each machine feature on your site’s Cleaning Instruction Cards. These will need to be updated every time a new piece of equipment arrives, and a relevant training session should accompany this.

                                    Which operatives are most likely to be impacted by these procedures?

                                    The Hygiene and Engineering Teams

                                    If a machine is left on or reconnects during repairs, maintenance, or cleaning, this could result in a serious injury or fatality. The chance of this happening only increases if your hygiene operatives or engineers are working on a machine with blades, linkage, or chains. A successful lock out program will keep your hygiene and engineering teams safe. Equally, an inadequate policy will put them in serious danger. A confused system will also slow down your operatives, with the wrong machines being locked out or machines being locked out for longer than necessary.

                                    The Production Team

                                    Although the consequences will be far less severe for your production team, a poorly-managed lock out program could also impact this department. Instead of being able to get on with their duties, they could be significantly slowed down by a machine that has been locked out and forgotten about. Accountability is key, so make sure your production team know who is in charge of lock outs. They also need to understand the importance of waiting for an authorised operative to restore a locked out machine, as taking matters into their own hands could spell disaster.

                                    Who is in charge of the training that relates to our Lock Out Program?

                                    Ideally, the Lock Out Program at your site should be managed by an individual operating on a senior level. This person will need to hold regular training sessions for the leads in each department – making sure all the information being passed down is accurate and up-to-date. If you plan to take on this role and you are struggling to find suitable training resources, why not reach out to the suppliers of your lock out equipment to see if they have any helpful literature or video tutorials? You could also turn to a sister site for guidance. Another tip is to keep a clear record of any training carried out, as this will be of use during internal inspections and upcoming audits.

                                    Who is responsible for writing the equipment-specific lock out procedures?

                                    As with every process taking place at your site, it’s important that your Lock Out Program is carefully recorded. To meet the relevant standards and specifications, you will need to have your equipment-specific lock out procedures in writing. Before asking someone at your site to take on this task, it is vital that they have the relevant training and understand exactly what your auditing body expects from these records. Again, turning to your supplier and a sister site could be the best place to start. You could also speak to the manufacturer of the machine itself, as its possible that the instruction manual will have a section on health and safety.


                                    So that brings us to the end of our guide to setting up a successful Lock Out Program at your site. As you make your way through the process of finding the right equipment, introducing Visual Management, and training up your operatives, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help with any enquiries. You can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com. Alternatively, you can use the form below to arrange a free consultation.  

                                    If you would like further guidance relating to the advice shared in this article, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                      ATP

                                      ATP Testing vs. A3 Testing: Everything you need to know

                                      Understanding the vital difference between ATP and A3 testing. Helping you to select the best option for your site.

                                      The latest audit data indicates hygiene is one of the leading causes for non-conformities issued against Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. Therefore, it is more important than ever for your site to prioritise hygiene at every level.

                                      Hygiene monitoring is one of the best ways to do this. Instead of leaving your operatives in the dark, validating the quality of your cleans will help you to establish a plan of action – identifying any areas where processes need to be changed and enabling your Hygiene Teams to check the cleanliness of even those hard-to-reach areas.

                                      But what is the best way to do this?

                                      A high number of sites are making the move over to the A3 system – an improved ATP methodology that detects all organic residue and microorganisms on surfaces and in liquids. However, with a lot of sites still relying on conventional ATP swabs, you may be unsure as to the best solution for your factory. In this article, we hope to provide some clarity and will be tackling the following questions. There is valuable content in each section, but you can also use the links below to skip to the answer most relevant to your needs:

                                      What is ATP and why is it important?

                                      What are the key differences between an ATP meter and the A3 system?

                                      How does an A3 meter eliminate the possibility of False Negative Readings?

                                      What is the consequence of organic residue still being present on a surface?

                                      The McCain Foods Case Study

                                      How does A3 technology relate to audit compliance and BRCGS Issue 9

                                      How do you use the A3 system?

                                      How do I store and access my results?

                                      Which industries will benefit the most from A3 technology?

                                      Get started with your A3 System

                                      What is ATP and why is it important?

                                      Before we do anything else, it’s important that we run through the basics of what ATP is and why it’s so important to your site.

                                      After all, even a general understanding of the science behind your hygiene testing will make it so much easier for you to identify any areas where your operation could be enhanced. This brief explanation could also help you to make sense of any confusing test results and justify future investment. 

                                      Put simply, what is ATP?

                                      ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a molecule found in all living cells. Because of this, food and beverage production sites regularly test for ATP when they are trying to determine the overall hygiene levels of a surface and the overall efficiency of a clean. A positive ATP test shows that organic residue is still present on a surface, but it is a common misconception that a negative ATP test proves the inverse. In fact, even with a negative result, adenosine molecules could still be present.

                                      But, how is it possible for a surface to pass an ATP test even when organic residue is present?

                                      ATP is an unstable molecule that degrades during processes such as cooking and fermentation. Under certain conditions it can degrade to become ADP (Adenosine Diphosphate) and AMP (Adenosine Monophosphate). If this happens, a standard ATP test could offer a pass result even if organic residue is still present in the form of ADP or AMP.

                                      What processes cause ATP to degrade to ADP and AMP?

                                      Below are just a few examples of processes that cause ATP to degrade to ADP and AMP. It is likely that a number of them are already taking place at your site.

                                      Cleaning: ATP can be degraded by common cleaning processes such as wiping a surface down with hot water. This is also true of the application of chemicals such as detergents, disinfectants, and sanitisers.

                                      Blanching: this process involves briefly immersing food in boiling water, then plunging it into ice water. During this process, ATP will likely be degraded by its exposure to the high temperature of the boiling water.

                                      Heated foods: Along with blanching, other processes that involve the significant increase of temperature have the potential to degrade ATP. Environments with extremely high temperatures are unfavourable to ATP molecules and could result in them converting to ADP or AMP.

                                      Processed food: ATP is produced by the breakdown of food molecules such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The amount of ATP in processed food can be impacted by a site’s processing methods. As mentioned, heating a product to high temperatures can result in the degradation of ATP. Freezing can also damage the cell membrane and impact the rate of ATP production. Finally, the addition of salt, sugar, and preservatives changes the pH of a product, with this having a knock-on effect on the enzymes involved in ATP production.

                                      Fermentation: Fermentation involves the breakdown of glucose through glycolysis, which yields a limited amount of ATP compared to oxidative phosphorylation. Although high levels of ATP are generally observed towards the start of this process, as fermentation progresses and the availability of fermentable sugars decreases, the metabolic activity of yeasts may slow down, leading to a gradual decrease in ATP levels.

                                      What does the presence of ADP and AMP mean?

                                      ADP and AMP indicates the presence of organic residue. This organic residue is an excellent breeding ground for a new generation of bacteria, and this new generation of bacteria could include ATP. Therefore, it is essential that your Hygiene Monitoring system is capable of detecting adenosine molecules in all three forms. Otherwise, it could pass a surface that has the potential to become a breeding ground for new and undetected ATP.

                                      What are the key differences between an ATP meter and the A3 system?

                                      Seen as a direct response to the limitations of ATP testing and the dangers posed by misleading results, A3 technology allows you to detect not only ATP, but also ADP and AMP. This means that even if ATP degrades during your production process, it will still be possible for your hygiene operatives to accurately test for all organic residue.

                                      Boasting superior sensitivity and stability, A3 can be used for the daily monitoring of environmental contamination at your site. This system detects food residues and organic materials, along with biofilms.

                                      Below is a brief video demonstration that shows the higher sensitivity and broader detection ability of the A3 system when compared to conventional ATP tests:

                                      Why are the results of an ATP meter and an A3 system different?

                                      Luciferase is the enzyme that produces light in the presence of ATP. The amount of ATP on a surface can be measured in relation to the intensity of the luminescence emitted. When ATP is in exposed to heat, acids, alkalis, and enzymes, it will try to conserve energy by reducing the amount of luminescence produced – degrading to become ADP, and possibly further, to AMP.

                                      In contrast, an A3 meter introduces recycling enzymes that allow for conversion between all three adenosine molecules. The introduction of the PK Enzyme allows for the conversion of ADP to ATP and the introduction of the PPDK Enzyme allows for the conversion of AMP to ATP. This enables the A3 meter to carry out a simultaneous measurement of ATP, ADP, and AMP.

                                      How different are the results produced by an A3 system and an ATP meter?

                                      The graphs below show the results of an A3 System in comparison to three ATP meters. All four devices are testing for RLU, otherwise known as Relative Light Units. As mentioned above, this is because Luciferase produces light in the presence of ATP.

                                      Even though the devices are testing the same surface, the results differ dramatically, with the A3 System providing high RLU readings and the ATP tests sitting at a much lower level. This demonstrates the importance of measuring AMP, ADP and ATP simultaneously, with the high RLU reading clearly demonstrating the presence of organic food residues that were undetectable to conventional ATP tests.

                                      In contrast, the A3 system uses the PK and PPDK Enzymes to convert ADP and AMP to ATP, generating a much higher and much more accurate reading. Instead of risking the organic residue acting as an excellent breeding ground for new bacteria, hygiene operatives will be able to re-clean the surface until it is free from any soil.

                                      How does an A3 meter eliminate the possibility of False Negative Readings?

                                      Unlike ATP testing, a working A3 meter eliminates the possibility of false negative readings. ATP Meters often display a reading of 0 after swabbing. When this happens, it is understandable that operatives assume an effective clean has taken place and there isn’t any organic residue left on the surface being tested. However, a reading of 0 can also mean a swab has been exposed to high concentration of chemical detergent. Another explanation is that there is a problem with the enzyme in the swab or the swab itself is faulty. An incorrect swabbing procedure can also generate false negative results.

                                      When it comes to traditional ATP testing, false negative results are typically ignored and hardly ever investigated. In contrast, the A3 meter and swab have been designed in a way that means they will always produce a reading (normally between 1-8), even if it is extremely low. In this case, a reading of 0 indicates a potential fault that requires further investigation.

                                      What is the consequence of organic residue still being present on a surface?

                                      As mentioned above, when ATP, ADP, and AMP are detected, they generate a reading for RLU. As you can see in this graph, a high RLU reading indicates the presence of organic residue and a poor clean. You will also see that this directly correlates with the amount of bacteria present on the surface. Put simply, a high RLU reading can be seen as a clear indicator of a high bacterial count.

                                      If a surface passes an ATP test when ADP or AMP is still present, your Hygiene Team will be unable to accurately validate their cleans. Instead of having the opportunity to adapt their processes to achieve better results, they could be handing an area over to production while there is still a chance of organic material contaminating a product. This could result in a failed audit, a product recall, and even the illness or fatality of a consumer.

                                      The McCain Foods Case Study

                                      Here at Klipspringer, we recently published a Case Study with McCain Foods. This study explores the impact of the A3 system on McCain’s Scarborough site. Before switching over to an A3 meter, the Scarborough site found that visibly unclean surfaces were passing traditional ATP swab tests. The swabs were even indicating that potato didn’t contain any ATP once it had been blanched. This was happening because the ATP on these surfaces had degraded to become ADP and AMP. Essentially, organic residue was still present, but the ATP swabs were unable to detect it.

                                      The introduction of an A3 system helped to explain the confusing results previously generated by the ATP tests. Instead of passing visibly unclean surfaces or blanched potatoes, the A3 meter was able to detect the presence of ADP and AMP. This resulted in the following benefits:

                                      • Increased swabbing reliability in a wide range of testing conditions 
                                      • Site’s Hygiene Team could update cleaning regime to reflect test results
                                      • No chance of achieving false-positive readings 
                                      • Ease-of-use when swabbing (small unit, fast set-up, quick results) 
                                      • Reduced allergen swabbing requirements, and hence reduced overall costs 

                                      You may have noticed the final point about reduced allergen swabbing requirements. It’s important to stress that an A3 system does not test for allergens and should never be relied upon for this process. However, if a surface is free from organic residue, it follows that there isn’t any residue left to contaminate a non-allergen product. Allergen tests will still need to take place, but A3 technology should help to reduce their frequency.

                                      During a six-to-eight-month trial, the Scarborough site found that if a surface passed an A3 test it would go on to pass a gluten swab and then an ELISA test. In fact, during this period, McCain Foods didn’t have a single allergen fail following an A3 swab pass. This provided an opportunity for the site to reduce the amount of allergen swabs and ELISA tests taking place. This not only resulted in significant savings, but also sped up the process of the Hygiene team releasing lines ready for production.

                                      How does A3 technology relate to audit compliance and BRCGS Issue 9?

                                      Passing an audit isn’t just about keeping your factory up and running, it’s also a sign that you are protecting the people consuming your product – quite literally saving lives on a daily basis. Audit-compliance should be factored into any changes to your site’s processes. It’s important that any developments increase your chance of meeting the relevant requirements and impressing your inspector. With this in mind, we have gathered extracts from four of the clauses featured in Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. As you will see, they all have a direct link to A3 technology:

                                      Clause 4.11.3 - Cleaning and Disinfection

                                      Limits of acceptable and unacceptable cleaning performance shall be defined for food contact surfaces and processing equipment. These limits shall be based on the potential hazards relevant to the product or processing area (e.g. microbiological, allergen, foreign-body, or product-to-product contamination). Therefore, acceptable levels of cleaning may be defined by visual appearance,            ATP bioluminescence techniques, microbiological testing, allergen testing or chemical testing as appropriate.

                                      How does this relate to A3 technology?

                                      Depending on the potential hazards relating to your product, auditors will expect your site to carry out regular hygiene tests – establishing clear pass/fail parameters. ATP bioluminescence techniques are listed as an example of this, with this category including ATP swabbing and the use of an A3 meter. A commitment to allergen testing is also expected.


                                      Clause 4.11.8.1 - Environmental Monitoring

                                      The design of the environmental monitoring programme shall be based on risk, and at a minimum include:

                                      • Sampling procedures
                                      • Identification of sample locations
                                      • Frequency of tests
                                      • Target organism(s) (e.g. pathogens, spoilage organisms and/ore indicator organisms)
                                      • Test methods (e.g. settle plates, rapid testing, and swabs)
                                      • Recording and evaluation of results

                                      How does this relate to A3 technology?

                                      The use of an A3 meter is the perfect example of rapid testing. Evidence of your site carrying out tests with this system could be presented to auditors as a clear sign of your commitment to environmental monitoring.


                                      Clause 5.3.3 - Allergen Management

                                      A documented risk assessment shall be carried out to identify routes of contamination (cross-contact) and establish documented policies, and procedures for handling raw materials and intermediate and finished products, to ensure cross-contamination (cross-contact) is avoided. This assessment shall include:

                                      • Consideration of the physical state of the allergenic material (e.g. powder, liquid, particulate)
                                      • Identification of potential points of cross-contamination (cross-contact) through the process flow
                                      • Assessment of the risk of allergen cross-contamination (cross contact) at each process step
                                      • Identification of suitable controls to reduce or eliminate the risk of cross-contamination

                                      How does this relate to A3 technology?

                                      Being able to accurately test for the presence or absence of organic residue is an essential part of allergen control. Even with an A3 system at your site, allergen testing will still be essential. However, as evidenced by the McCain Foods Case Study, this technology can enhance your process, whilst saving you a significant amount of money, time, and effort.

                                      When compared to traditional ATP meters, the A3 monitor demonstrates superior sensitivity and stability for the detection of food residues and allergens. The graphs below show the different levels of Luminescence Intensity (RLU) registered by each system when testing the same surface. As you will see the surfaces are being tested for the presence of four out of the fourteen major food allergens:


                                      Clause 5.3.8 - Allergen Management

                                      Equipment or area-cleaning procedures shall be designed to remove or reduce to acceptable levels any potential cross-contamination (cross-contact) by allergens. The cleaning methods shall be validated to ensure they are effective and the effectiveness of the procedure routinely verified. 

                                      How does this relate to A3 technology?

                                      Using A3 technology at your site will allow you to demonstrate a commitment to validating your cleans. If you have made the switch from ATP swabs to the A3 meter, you can use this to impress your auditor – highlighting your determination to eliminate the risk of false negative readings.

                                      How do you use the A3 system?

                                      Introducing any new system to your site can be a daunting prospect, especially if you already have a heavy workload and looming deadlines. The good news is, you won’t have to navigate this process alone. Here at Klipspringer, we provide ongoing support for the implementation of A3 technology. We work closely with a team of micro-biologists to help you establish benchmarks, create a validation document to share with auditors, and train up your operatives. Whether you are evaluating the cleanliness of your production line, carrying out comprehensive hygiene monitoring, or conducting hygiene education for your employees, we will be on hand to guide you through the following steps:

                                      Selecting the right swabs for your site

                                      Here at Klipspringer, we supply Surface Swabs, Pre-moistened Surface Swabs, and Water Swabs. If you are testing a particularly dry area of your site, you will need to use either a pre-moistened surface swab or a dry surface swab that has been momentarily dipped in tap water.

                                      When making this decision, many sites opt for pre-moistened swabs in an attempt to save time and effort. Some sites are also concerned that tap water could impact the results of the A3 system.

                                      Although this is technically correct, tap water will only impact the reading up to 30 RLU, so not to a significant extent. Another point to consider is that, unlike surface swabs dipped in tap water, pre-moistened swabs can leave a slight residue – something that a lot of hygiene teams want to avoid.

                                      If you are unsure about the best fit for your site, this is an area where Klipspringer, along with our team of microbiologists, can help you to make the right decision.


                                      Evaluating the cleanliness of your production line

                                      Determine the test locations. Identify the areas that are most likely to remain contaminated. This could be surfaces that have come into direct contact with products or raw materials e.g. the surface of your conveyor belts. It could also be the hard-to-reach areas that are likely to missed during a clean e.g. the valves of a tank outlet or pipe-coupling packings.

                                      Decide on the Benchmark values for each location. These values should reflect the condition of a surface, the type of product that has been in contact with it, and the risk management level of the area. It is recommended that you conduct self-validation to establish your own benchmark values. We can help you with this decision, but as a general rule:

                                      • 200 RLU or lower: smooth, direct contact, or easy-to-clean surfaces (e.g. stainless steel, glass)
                                      • 500 RLU or lower: textured, indirect contact, or hard-to-clean surfaces (e.g. resin)

                                      Determine the swabbing method of each location. Again, we can help you with this decision, but general guidance suggests:

                                      • Large sample: swab a 10cm square area vertically and horizontally about ten times in each direction
                                      • Small sample: swab the entire area thoroughly


                                      Preventing secondary contamination through hygiene monitoring

                                      Determine the test locations. Identify the areas that are difficult to wash and most likely to remain contaminated. It could also be the areas that have come into contact with unsterilised (raw) food.

                                      Decide on the Benchmark values for each location. This will be the same as the approach listed for evaluating the cleanliness of your production line.

                                      Determine the swabbing method of each location. This will be the same as the approach listed for evaluating the cleanliness of your production line.


                                      Conducting hygiene education for your employees

                                      Decide when to carry out the testing. After hand washing, but before using disinfectants.

                                      Decide on the Benchmark values for each location.

                                      • 2000 RLU or lower: entire palm, including fingertips and between fingers. 90% of people can achieve this level when they conduct an A3 test after hand washing.

                                      How do I store and access my results?

                                      The Lumitester App can be used to store the data gathered through your A3 testing.

                                      The app is capable of sophisticated data analysis, with inspection pass rates automatically turned into graphs. There is also the option of downloading the data onto Microsoft Excel – presenting it in your desired format. This will allow you to track trends and identify any areas in need of improvement.

                                      In addition to this, the app will make it easier for you to motivate and manage your operatives. Small wins can be celebrated and oversites can be met with accountability, with every test recorded alongside the date it took place and the name of the operative responsible. Cooperation will also be made easier, as you will be able to share data between different individuals and sites. This data can be stored in the cloud, making it accessible at any time, from anywhere in the world.

                                       

                                      • Upload results to the cloud via Bluetooth
                                      • Set test points and benchmark values
                                      • Display time-series data for each test
                                      • Track overall inspection scores, with graphs
                                      • Access results 24/7 – from any device, anywhere.

                                      Which industries will benefit the most from A3 technology?

                                      A3 testing is particularly useful for sites that handle both allergen and non-allergen products. It is also suited to factories that handle products with a high number of potential hazards. After all, standards of hygiene and cleanliness will be much higher if you are producing an item that could pose serious risk to the consumer. A3 technology has also proved successful in specific areas of the industry. Below are just a few examples:

                                      Get started with your A3 System


                                      That brings us to the end of our guide to ATP and A3 Testing. Hopefully we have left you with a comprehensive understanding of the two different methods, along with the reasons behind so many sites switching over to the A3 system. From increased accuracy and the elimination of false negatives to lower costs and a faster Hygiene Window, A3 technology has the potential to enhance your operation at every level.

                                      In the interest of being honest and open, Klipspringer is a proud supplier of the A3 Hygiene Monitor. However, we can guarantee that our interest in promoting this technology comes from a genuine belief in its ability to improve hygiene standards across your site and further protect consumers. Our Case Study with McCain Foods helps to put weight behind these words – a real-life example of A3 meters helping a site to secure success, supported by undeniable evidence and compelling testimonials.

                                      With around 22 years supporting over 4,000 food and beverage sites across the UK and Ireland, we are always happy to share our honest feedback and findings, determined to assist you in making the best decision for your site. We are also on hand to help with your enquiries, you can contact us on 01473 461800 or sales@klipspringer.com.  Alternatively, you can fill out the contact form below and one of our friendly team members will be in touch. 

                                      If you would like further guidance relating to A3 testing, the Klipspringer team would be happy to help. Share your details below to arrange a free consultation.


                                        Food Safety Outcomes

                                        Effective Food Safety Management: The Four Energies Needed for Predictable and Repeatable Results

                                        Following the success of the Food Safety Innovation Conference 2023, Denis Treacy, a key speaker at the event, recently joined Klipspringer Director, Alex Carlyon, and former GFSI Board Member, John Carter, for an engaging webinar on Effective Food Safety Management. The Webinar also explored the four energies needed to secure predictable and repeatable results. As the former Chief Officer for Safety and Quality at Pladis Global and the founder of Culture Compass, Denis had plenty of valuable insights to share. Together, with Alex and John, he established a clear road map towards Zero Defect Food Safety.

                                        You can scroll down to read our key takeaways from this webinar. Alternatively, you can navigate the menu below to skip straight to the section most relevant to your needs… 

                                        Is there such a thing as Zero Defect Food Safety?

                                        The Four Energies of Repeatable and Predictable Outcomes

                                        The importance of Functional Equity

                                        Webinar Q&A

                                        Is there such a thing as Zero Defect Food Safety?

                                        First, you need to think about whether it is possible for your organisation to avoid failure entirely. Could it be set up in a way that guarantees Zero Defect Food Safety, and if so, what is the route map to this destination? You also need to consider the potential hurdles, frustrations, and opportunities that lie ahead. This will help you to establish a clear plan for the future.

                                        Another helpful exercise is to answer the following questions, something that Denis did himself in the first portion of the webinar:

                                        Q. What is the primary purpose of any food business?

                                        A. To make money. If you misunderstand this primary concept, you could be misunderstanding your entire business. To secure success, your organisation needs to drive profit.

                                        Q. Who are your key internal and external stakeholders?

                                        A. This could be anything from your NPD team’s determination to launch a new product to your leadership team’s commitment to optimising financial delivery. To secure Zero Defect Food Safety, you need to understand the agendas, influences, and responsibilities of all the different people and departments operating within your organisation.

                                        The Four Energies of Repeatable and Predictable Outcomes 

                                        Denis believes the best way to achieve Zero Defect Food Safety is to ensure the perfect balance of The Four Energies of Repeatable and Predictable Outcomes. These energies are:

                                        1. Strategy
                                        2. Performance
                                        3. Organisation
                                        4. Culture

                                        If you focus on just one or two of these areas, there is a chance that you will never achieve your goal, never get started, or will be fooled into thinking you have reached your target long before you have. However, once you recognise the equal importance of all four energies, you can establish a route map towards success.

                                        1) Strategy

                                        Here, you need to think about who or what is setting the agenda for your business. This is likely your Senior Leadership Team, as they will have control over investment, risk, and future-planning. Whether it’s selecting the retailers you are going to supply or the accreditation standard you are going to work to, these decisions will have a significant impact on the running of your site.

                                        Although you won’t be able to change these agendas, you can certainly influence them. To do this, you will need to:

                                        • Ensure someone who values hygiene, health and safety, and food safety has a voice at a strategic level. If this isn’t the case, your business could be at risk of cross contamination, customer complaints, and serious downtime.
                                        • Embrace a positive mindset. You shouldn’t be stifling the creativity and ambition of your New Product Development Team. Instead, you should be helping them to safely navigate obstacles.
                                        • Highlight the importance of Hygienic Design. Instead of waiting for subpar equipment to be introduced to your site, you should get involved in the manufacturing process – identifying any issues or opportunities while there is still time to make changes.

                                        2) Performance

                                        When measuring the performance of your business, targeting failure will fuel a negative culture that is destined to eventually fail itself. There is nothing wrong with measuring consumer complaints, non-conformities, and product recalls, but you should never target them as objectives. Doing so will cast a shadow instead of shining a light – encouraging operatives to hide their mistakes instead of being open and honest.

                                        In an ideal world, the testing at your site should be confirming what you already know – demonstrating your factory’s cleanliness and your team’s ability to operate at a Gold Standard Level. You can then encourage your team to make positive changes, enhancing an already excellent process to secure ever-improving results.

                                        3) Organisation

                                        To move your organisation in the right direction, it is essential that you are interacting with people who are able to embrace your vision – understanding both the opportunities and risks involved. This is especially important if your business operates on a global scale, as the responses may vary with every culture. Training and supervision will help with this, as will speaking from a place of credibility.

                                        Another important step is to evaluate your Crisis Management Process. What is the current Communication Structure at your site? What does your escalation process look like? How confident are your operatives in raising issues – shutting down compromised lines and areas? Crisis Management should be a daily activity and should be normalised at every level.

                                        4) Culture

                                        “Good businesses have a great strategy.

                                        Great businesses add a great culture.”

                                        Martin Glenn, former CEO of the Iglo Group, PepsiCo, and Walkers Snack Foods

                                        The culture at your organisation is formed by:

                                        • Leadership and behaviours
                                        • Internal relationships
                                        • Business and personal values
                                        • Positive motivation

                                        Your efforts to nurture a positive culture need to be continuous. Say one week you encourage your operatives to wear the correct PPE, but the next week you neglect to reinforce this message, you’re not growing a culture, you are just reacting at random.

                                        Don’t wait for something to go wrong. A lot of businesses only react if they receive a customer complaint, have to carry out a product recall, or fail an audit. Establishing a positive culture at your site will ensure that even if none of these incidents occur, your site is continuously striving to do better than the day before.

                                        Encourage a culture of curiosity. Instead of approaching an issue with judgement and defensiveness, try to embrace a curious approach. View any incidents as an opportunity to learn about your processes and to find out what your site could be doing better.

                                        GOYA. You need to be proactive. Investigate, observe, react, and report. The culture at your site should encourage everyone to be active participants in food safety management.

                                        The Dupont Bradley Curve suggests there are four different states of internal culture.

                                        A lot of sites operate at a reactive level, but to achieve Zero Defect Food Safety, you should be working towards an Interdependent State.

                                        Reactive: In a reactive culture, your operatives are acting off their natural instincts.

                                        Dependent: In a supervised culture, your operatives do whatever they are told. They are motivated by the directions they are given and the feedback they receive.

                                        Independent: In an independent culture, certain pockets of people are doing the right thing regardless of whether or not they are being supervised. Even without audits and inspections, high standards become their personal responsibility. At this point, a factory can aim for Zero Defect Food Safety.

                                        Interdependent: In this culture, everybody on site does the right thing and encourages their colleagues to do the same. At this point, Zero Defect Food Safety  becomes a choice – operatives will only be at risk if they choose to be.

                                        The importance of Functional Equity

                                        You need to choose your language or risk losing your audience. You will never be able to influence your organisation by talking about the consequences of failure. Instead of focusing on the negatives, switch your attention to the positive opportunities that lie ahead and what your business could achieve if everyone worked together to reach a collective goal.

                                        Q&A

                                        What is the most important action I can take to improve the part of the culture that encourages being curious when we find failure (rather that judging others), especially when some colleagues are busy spinning on the spot?

                                        It is difficult to determine a single action without understanding the specific challenges within an organisation. I would start with questions such as: Who are the stakeholders? What does the internal business culture promote? However, some initial advice would be to implement a Continuous Improvement Process linked to a HSE style, near miss reporting strategy. This will encourage everyone at your site to look for, identify, and report anything that could reduce efficiency, increase risk, or promote the ‘papering over’ of issues. 

                                        Do you have any advice on implementing these strategies into a work force that has 80% different nationalities? The language barriers in my workplace makes training so much harder.

                                        The more diverse a workforce, the more opportunity there is for you to reach a better solution. After all, different cultures may have experience of different routes to success. The obvious challenge is to ensure the language of the manufacturing plant is common, the signage is visual not verbal, the training and direction is understood, and the daily behaviours set the unspoken example. 

                                        What can a business do to incentivize the independence of its staff?

                                        Giving authority to those who know and understand how processes can be run optimally (e.g. process operators or inbound materials teams) can be a very successful route to take if carefully planned and well supported. This can have a dramatic impact on the extent to which individuals and teams become invested in their work. I have a few examples that I have used in the past. One is to put technical drawings of the plant up on its walls before asking your operators and craft team members to write any issues and ideas onto the drawings. Encourage them to think about how the plant could run more efficiently, with less waste, better compliance to spec, and a more effective approach to the cleaning of kit.

                                        Is there any real difference between what we measure and what we target when it comes to performance indicators for Hygiene/Food safety? 

                                        Emphatically, yes! There are many areas we want to understand and monitor (PI’s and KPI’s), so we have a breadth of data to interrogate and turn into information that will support our decisions. This data will lead us to make changes and improvements across all manner of areas. However, when we set targets for colleagues within our organisation, it becomes about what they are most likely to focus on, so we have to be mindful that these targets need to deliver not just the objective, but the broader business benefit and motivation. I will cover this in further detail during the second FSI webinar. 

                                        What software is suited to a maintenance team in manufacturing that needs to log and prioritise issues that need to be fixed? We currently have a reactive maintenance team, as opposed to a proactive one that carries out preventative maintenance. 

                                        There is a plethora of software platforms that enable the creation of PPM (Planned Preventative Maintenance), so it is a case of assessing the various merits, costs and integration capabilities. At one point, my preferred system was SAP PM, but I recognise it was very expensive and it took a huge resource to populate the data flush before it became operational. If there is already some kind of system or engineering LAN (Local Area Network) available, you may be able to get a PM module on top.

                                        In smaller businesses, where main decisions are undertaken by owners and not trained professionals, how can you drive improvement when the mindset of the senior manager / strategy of the business is to take large risks and to save money?

                                        Anyone would struggle to get traction in a business with leaders who are deliberately reckless, knowingly negligent, and deliberately putting consumers at risk. Individuals like this are criminals. However, there is a means by which you could encourage the right direction in a business focussed on margins and that is to use margins to your advantage. If you can demonstrate your ability to generate value (in terms of financial gains), you may well find that you have a platform to build off. You need to start thinking commercially and get into the detail of budgets to see where your solutions could positively impact costs. Don’t just focus on the theoretical ‘cost of quality’ or the avoidance of penalty costs, these factors won’t motivate a factory manager. 

                                        What does GOYA stand for?

                                        GOYA has an element of Gemba walks to it, but without the part where you wait for an event to investigate or a particular team to deliver it. A good example of this is when I created some simple pocket cards to brief team members and visitors to sites (e.g. internal leaders). This enabled them to create a valued intervention whenever they walked the plant. GOYA is about driving an internal culture through the ‘supervision’ barrier and into the “independent” category. Imagine walking into a manufacturing facility, meeting the Factory Manager and asking them questions such as: Is your factory operating safely today? Is it in a clean & hygienic condition? Are all of the products you are making totally in spec? If so, let’s go and check together. This exchange reflects an example principle of GOYA. 

                                        What would be the benefit of having Hygiene/Food Safety as part of the leadership team business strategy? 

                                        Business leadership teams decide on the strategy and direction of a site. They also make major decisions relating to resources, budgets and capital allocations. They do this based on the risks they are aware of, or understand. If elements of their responsibility as leaders are not well represented or understood, they will make less appropriate decisions and may not invest effectively. It therefore benefits any organisation to ensure all risks (such as food safety) are represented at a leadership level, so the most appropriate decisions are made to minimise risk. 

                                        Surely a business that focuses energy, effort, and investment into driving a food safety culture would have stronger performance than one that doesn’t? 

                                        Not necessarily. If a business lacks the strategic intent to resource the factors that drive a reduction in food safety risks, if it does not qualify or measure the right performance indicators, if it doesn’t nurture the right energy around how it communicates, food safety culture will not be a sustainable change and the business will find itself falling foul of recurring issues. In this instance, food safety culture will only ever exist as a campaign that begins with a flourish, but decays over time. 

                                        Do you have any advice on turning your ideas into action? I have a few managers that don’t seem to be listening to me regarding my continuous improvement ideas. 

                                        Identify how your ideas will reduce costs, put a financial argument together that delivers a cost or resource reduction (you may need to think laterally about how that gets delivered and it may not be in a budget you control). Then, find stakeholders (like the finance or ops team) to review it and support your argument. I guarantee this will start the internal debate. 

                                        In the webinar, you mentioned that remaining curious is essential when dealing with setbacks and problems, yet earlier, you stated that targeting failure will lead to failure in itself. Please can you elaborate and clarify this difference. 

                                        Using negative measures of failure, such as consumer complaints, to target quality improvements could motivate teams to focus on redefining the measure, reclassifying consumer feedback, or trying to pass responsibility for consumer defects elsewhere. Targeting improvements in areas such as process capability allows for a more collaborative effort in driving reduced defects and better outcomes. I will cover this in further detail during the second FSI webinar. 

                                        A major pain point for our business is getting larger chains to improve their customer experience in a way that covers all ingredients and not just the 14 main allergens. Supply Chain leaders find it difficult to collect data sheets from suppliers which means their allergen communications to customers are often very risky.

                                        This is all about understanding the key issues at play: the size of the operation, the transient nature of the workforce, and the unknowns in the supply chain. The primary solution is to work with the information you have to create a Risk Reduction Strategy. You can then use your Risk Assessment framework to identify areas where you could improve, tighten, or even relax controls. Finally, list these objectives in order of priority, starting with the data or intervention that will give you the biggest risk reduction.

                                        Can we apply the concepts of: unconsciously incompetent, consciously incompetent, consciously competent, unconsciously competent to your route map towards Zero Defect Food Safety?

                                        This is indeed a platform I have used in that respect and one which will help to facilitate the growth of competence and capability within a function. Being able to understand what your team members don’t know and why they don’t know it, is the first step to growing their awareness. For example, someone who has never suffered from a food intolerance nor had any dealings with anyone who has a food intolerance, may be completely unaware of the problem. They are unlikely to become competent just because they have ‘had the training’ so will remain a threat to food safety. In other words, one is unlikely to be able to drive a car just because they’ve read an instruction manual. 

                                        The Food Safety Innovation Conference 2024

                                        Held at the University of Lincoln on Tuesday 5th September 2023, the Food Safety Innovation Conference brought together over 150 industry professionals to discuss the advancement of food safety and hygiene, the importance of true innovation, and the value of challenging the status quo.

                                        A collaborative effort from Klipspringer and FoodClean, the conference will be returning to the same location on Thursday 13th June 2024.

                                        If you would like to reserve your place at next year’s event and access an early-bird discount, simply click the button below.

                                        So that brings us to the end of the very first Food Safety Innovation Conference Webinar.

                                        If you have any further questions, you can reach out to Alex at alex.carlyon@klipspringer.com or contact the Klipspringer team on 01473 461800 and sales@klipspringer.com.

                                        You can also connect with Denis at denis@culturecompassltd.com and learn more about Culture Compass at culturecompassltd.co.uk. 


                                        Top non-conformities

                                        The BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard, Issue 9: What are the Top Non-Conformities?

                                        BRCGS has released its data on the most common non-conformities issued against Issue 9 of the Global Food Safety Standard. In this article, we take a look at some of the key takeaways so far.

                                        In a recent BRCGS webinar, Foram Mehta, the organisation’s Technical Manager, provided an in depth review of the most common non-conformities to be issued so far against Issue 9 of the BRCGS Global Food Safety Standard. Foram revealed that, since the issue’s release in February 2023, there have already been more than 100,000 non-conformities raised. This shows there is still plenty of room for improvement, with a lot of sites falling down at the same five hurdles.

                                        In this article we will be providing a rundown of the data and guidance shared by Foram – covering one of the most popular major non-conformities, along with all five of the top minor non-conformities presenting so far. We will also be exploring the importance of root cause analysis and explaining what you should do if you are issued with a non-conformity. As you can imagine, there is valuable information in each of these sections, but if you would like to skip ahead to a specific subject, you can do that using the links below:

                                        What are the top major non-conformities for Issue 9 so far?

                                        What are the top minor non-conformities for Issue 9 so far?

                                        The role of root cause analysis

                                        What should you do if you receive a non-conformity?

                                        What are t